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trust no body

hankshouse

Registered User
goose bay,labrador
just had annual on my pa18 at airport. lived about 25 miles away
on gravel strip in labrador.
started engine, gotclearence from tower and took off.
crossed the harbour and noticed a few drops of oil on
windshield. kept flying as I did not want to return to airport.
and home was only 20 miles away.
oil got thicker aand was flying out my side window.
only trees below. soon in middle of my flight so I had
little choice but throttle back to about 45 mph and carry
on. landed with an covered windshield. checked oil--none.
slightly burnt smell.
oil fiting had not been tightened during inspection. put in new oil
and let it run half hour. changed oil again.

just glad I stayed out of the trees
 
Sure can't trust anyone. Makes a good case for maybe staying in the pattern for a few touch and goes after maintenance away from home.
 
Heck, I don't even trust myself after I do my own maintenance, so why would you trust anyone else?? When I have re&re'd the HighPressure screen or something similar I always do a single circuit and then pop the cowling to make sure that... say the "phone call" didn't make me forget something. Have seen/heard too many horror stories from guys having maint done and being able to start a tool collection from what they find on the cylinders etc when they get home, than to trust anyone else to get it 100% right the first time.

Hope your engine's alright if it had zero oil left in it (did the gauge hit zero on the way home, or where you a little distracted to even notice that one?). Doesn't take long to lose 7 or 8 quarts now does it!
 
I have had three close calls due to "oops" and " I must have forgot" or "I sure thought I completed that" :oops:

Please everyone be vigilant EVERY step of the way in maintenance and preflights.........STOP and really check. You get the blame anyway.

Bad crimping on a cable, cable was important. :angel:
Fixed, ground out and rewelded, top half only of a bad weld. Only top half easily visible. :agrue:
fitting not tightened and leaked BAD. :angel:

Chris
 
I always ground run an engine even after just a filter change and then check for leaks. A problem like you had is always my biggest fear. Check and check again.
 
can't trust anyone

Let us know how your engine fairs....I just had an annual in which I assisted with alot of the time consuming stuff,panel removal,floorboards etc.I did however do the oil & filter.And like someone said in a previous post,I also double ckd.the quickdrain,wire,etc.I also stayed in the pattern for approx.15 mins.& then did some touch & go's and full stop landings.This is all without pass.,that is my rule to keep the risks to a min.If something does go wrong,I don't want anyone else to have the "thrill".Well we all can live & learn from your unfortunate exp.Glad to hear you tell the tale....Blue Skies & stay safe.
 
Be careful..........

I know of an Ercoupe that lost the oil cap in flight and flew 5 minutes with zero oil pressure. After adding more oil, everything appeared fine. The engine failed a month later, destroying the aircraft. Fortunately, no one was injured. The FAA said the failure was carburetor ice without even pulling the screens. I bought the whole airplane for the engine (C-90). When I found the oil screen absolutely packed with bearing material, I notified the FAA, who said to send them the bearings- which I did. Never heard a peep from them after that.
If I were you, I'd at least pull the screens and If I found them clear, fly a few hours and do it again, and again, and again......until I was certain no bearing material was burned out.

Mike in NC
 
Re: Be careful..........

CptKelly said:
I know of an Ercoupe that lost the oil cap in flight and flew 5 minutes with zero oil pressure. After adding more oil, everything appeared fine. The engine failed a month later, destroying the aircraft. Fortunately, no one was injured. The FAA said the failure was carburetor ice without even pulling the screens. I bought the whole airplane for the engine (C-90). When I found the oil screen absolutely packed with bearing material, I notified the FAA, who said to send them the bearings- which I did. Never heard a peep from them after that.
If I were you, I'd at least pull the screens and If I found them clear, fly a few hours and do it again, and again, and again......until I was certain no bearing material was burned out.

Mike in NC

Mike...

What's the Ercoupe N# or the date of the accident?... I'd like to see the NTSOB report...
 
Quote:
NTSOB


Ain't that the truth.

Depends.

sometimes there oughta be 2 A's in ahoe.

As in FAA-hoe.

Like I said, Depends. There's losers and keepers on both sides of that federal fence.

Sorry you guys have ugly stories about screwed-up maintenance. But a very interesting topic and I hope that more is shared.
 
"When Pigs Fly"......

The Ercoupe accident happened around 1973. A CFI flying in the Ercoupe was a very nice guy named Joe Gudger, unfortunately no longer with us.I believe this accident happened around Stockbridge, Ga. I bought the damaged hulk from the insurance company, and put the engine on a Clip Wing Cub after majoring it. Mr. CC Lening and Mr. JW Austin helped me with this project. Both of these great gentlemen are gone now, and its a loss for all of us.

Mike in NC
 
Re: "When Pigs Fly"......

CptKelly said:
The Ercoupe accident happened around 1973. A CFI flying in the Ercoupe was a very nice guy named Joe Gudger, unfortunately no longer with us.I believe this accident happened around Stockbridge, Ga. I bought the damaged hulk from the insurance company, and put the engine on a Clip Wing Cub after majoring it. Mr. CC Lening and Mr. JW Austin helped me with this project. Both of these great gentlemen are gone now, and its a loss for all of us.

Mike in NC

This it?...

NTSB Identification: MIA74FKG88
14 CFR Part 91 General Aviation
Event occurred Tuesday, June 25, 1974 in STOCKBRIDGE, GA
Aircraft: ERCO 415-E, registration: N94770

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- FILE DATE LOCATION AIRCRAFT DATA INJURIES FLIGHT PILOT DATA F S M/N PURPOSE----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------3-2291 74/6/25 STOCKBRIDGE,GA ERCO 415-E CR- 0 0 1 NONCOMMERCIAL COMMERCIAL, FL.INSTR., TIME - 1705 N94770 PX- 0 0 1 PLEASURE/PERSONAL TRANSP AGE 38, 844 TOTAL HOURS, DAMAGE-SUBSTANTIAL OT- 0 0 0 21 IN TYPE, NOT INSTRUMENT RATED. NAME OF AIRPORT - BERRY HILL DEPARTURE POINT INTENDED DESTINATION STOCKBRIDGE,GA LOCAL TYPE OF ACCIDENT PHASE OF OPERATION ENGINE FAILURE OR MALFUNCTION TAKEOFF: INITIAL CLIMB GEAR COLLAPSED LANDING: LEVEL OFF/TOUCHDOWN PROBABLE CAUSE(S) POWERPLANT - ENGINE STRUCTURE: MASTER AND CONNECTING RODS MISCELLANEOUS ACTS,CONDITIONS - MATERIAL FAILURE TERRAIN - HIGH VEGETATION FACTOR(S) MISCELLANEOUS ACTS,CONDITIONS - OVERLOAD FAILURE PARTIAL POWER LOSS - PARTIAL LOSS OF POWER - 1 ENGINE EMERGENCY CIRCUMSTANCES - FORCED LANDING OFF AIRPORT ON LAND REMARKS- NR 4 CNCTNG ROD BRG FAILED.


http://www.ntsb.gov/NTSB/brief.asp?ev_id=31077&key=0
 
You are good.....

Hey, yes, thats it. You are good. Now if I could convince you to vote for Bushy, so that we can still be free to fly, and have our guns, etc, etc, etc,.....
 
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