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This should be fun..............

cubdrvr

SPONSOR
YKN(mother city of the dakotas)
What airspace does the FAA legally control? All above the 200' tower limit? Lower? All airspace from the ground up? 500'? Sparsely populated to the ground?
Different for drones? Anywhere an aircraft can fly? How about my backyard? Any airspace not within 500' of structures, etc? Is there a reference of authority on
this? :pop:
 
Dave, it depends on context. “Controlled airspace” is generally A,B,C, D, and E airspace. Unless one of thos categories goes to the surface, anything below is “G” airspace, which is defined as “uncontrolled airspace”. Class G airspace often extends from the surface up to, but not including, either 700 feet or 1200 feet. But there are areas of G airspace that extend much higher. Class G airspace also exists above 60,000 feet. These are all depicted on aeronautical charts.

Now, can you do anything you like in an airplane, just because it’s in class G airspace? Nope, all the regs still apply. “Uncontrolled airspace” in the FAAs definition implies ATC doesn’t control the airspace. But all regulations, like remaining 500 feet from people, places and stuff in “sparsely populated” areas, still apply.

MTV
 
:oops: Back to school.
I was really trying to get a feel for their authority on airspace for structures, drone ops,etc. Or is that local government decisions? Do builders need FAA approval above 200'? And lighted?
 
:oops: Back to school.
I was really trying to get a feel for their authority on airspace for structures, drone ops,etc. Or is that local government decisions? Do builders need FAA approval above 200'? And lighted?
Approval not necessarily, but a completed airspace study is required. The FAA pushes their airspace protection rules onto the local communities around airports.
 
Over the years I have heard many stories of old timers that owned cubs / super cubs and only operated them over their large (one was sixty square miles) ranches. No pilots license, etc, and were baffled when the FAA got upset with them... After all, they never left their property.... :p

And then going the other direction, there are mineral and water rights...

sj
 
I met a farmer 25 miles northwest of Miles City, Montana, who had a Pawnee in a hangar. Sprayed his own crops, never had a license!
 
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