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Oops, darn it...

Recent conversation with agent verified the attention CC has created. They justify charging for risk. Not saying it's fair.
 
Saw a blue and while Cub(?) on its back yesterday afternoon on a gravel bar along the Knik. There was a helicopter there picking up the pilot. Gusty winds (maybe ~25-30 peak gusts), but I don't know the story.

Hate to see that, but at least it appeared that the pilot was OK.
 
Wow! I'd respect a tow truck driver for his comments about it coming right at him, not hyperbole would be my guess. The video seems to back him up. I think crashing into a hangar at an airport would be about as embarassing as it could get for a pilot. Like a truck driver at a Flying J, taking out a fuel island.
 
No, a new guy PIO'd one and knocked the nose gear out on landing.

Just goes to show that you can try and make an airplane dummy proof, but you can never be completely successful.

[I'm not against the NX Cub, BTW; its actually a brilliant idea for selling more Cub Crafters airplanes.]
 
Latest info I got is:

small jet pilot
2 week old nosewheel
lacked knowledge of ground effect


My interpretation: watches too much YouTube
 
Saw a blue and while Cub(?) on its back yesterday afternoon on a gravel bar along the Knik. There was a helicopter there picking up the pilot. Gusty winds (maybe ~25-30 peak gusts), but I don't know the story.

Hate to see that, but at least it appeared that the pilot was OK.

I saw this as well. I landed next to it to be absolutely sure no one was in it. From what I could see in the gravel and damage to the Cub, it looked like heavy braking, loss of directional control (sharp main tire drag mark from left to right) which ended in a nose over with power on (damage to the prop tips). The wind I'm sure was a factor as it was definitely windy (20-30) as mentioned. Both wingtips damaged with the right wing struts being bent up. Trooper report states that the pilot utilized a pack raft he had to float down the Knik until adequate cell reception at which point he called Troopers. He was picked up by one of the Robinsons from the resort that is close by. Glad he was ok but what a bummer to see a beautiful Cub beat up.
 
Wow! I'd respect a tow truck driver for his comments about it coming right at him, not hyperbole would be my guess. The video seems to back him up. I think crashing into a hangar at an airport would be about as embarassing as it could get for a pilot. Like a truck driver at a Flying J, taking out a fuel island.

That hangar saved their lives......

MTV
 
Reminds of an accident we watched at JO Creek a number of years back. Looks a lot like not enough flying speed to control the plane - time to lower the nose. I suspect the DA is pretty high there...

sj
 
74 degrees
5 knots wind.
4550 foot elevation
500 feet from centerline to nearest hangar.


Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org
 
74 degrees
5 knots wind.
4550 foot elevation
500 feet from centerline to nearest hangar.
Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org

aoa.jpg

So, roughly 6.5K - 7K density altitude. I think the extreme nose up attitude says it all...
 

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Latest info I got is:

small jet pilot
2 week old nosewheel
lacked knowledge of ground effect


My interpretation: watches too much YouTube

View attachment 65840

So, roughly 6.5K - 7K density altitude. I think the extreme nose up attitude says it all...
A combination of both of your observations. We don't know anything about this particular "small jet pilot". Jet airplanes are generally rotated to a certain pitch attitude and flown on a heading while being allowed to drift. I can visualize this particular pilot flying this airplane by practiced habit, rather than proper piloting technique. Perhaps he learned to fly in a Cherokee which doesn't depend on the use of rudders? Most jets I've been involved with fly nicely without using rudders.
 
I should add, by my observation many jet pilots never look out the window. They fly totally by instruments, even when in CAVU conditions. One eye on the runway during the takeoff run with the other eye on the instruments. After rotation, the outside eye closes. I say many...not all. In this case, if this is that pilot's habit, he would have had no clue he was about to be in trouble.
 
I should add, by my observation many jet pilots never look out the window. They fly totally by instruments, even when in CAVU conditions. One eye on the runway during the takeoff run with the other eye on the instruments. After rotation, the outside eye closes. I say many...not all. In this case, if this is that pilot's habit, he would have had no clue he was about to be in trouble.

Except for that thing we refer to as “The ball”?

MTV
 
Except for that thing we refer to as “The ball”?

MTV
If they even look at it. In most jets it's built into the bottom of another instrument. And the airplane usually is well coordinated without pushing pedals. I suspect (pure speculation on my part) that this pilot likely didn't see it or understand it's meaning.
 
If they even look at it. In most jets it's built into the bottom of another instrument. And the airplane usually is well coordinated without pushing pedals. I suspect (pure speculation on my part) that this pilot likely didn't see it or understand it's meaning.

Unless he was military, he likely did not learn to fly in jets so he should have SOME understanding of coordination - I would hope. All the new glass panels in small planes de-emphasize the coordination indicator (fancy word for "the ball"). For example, it is stuck at the top of the G5 and is hard for some to see.

sj
 
Yes, amazingly, the Air Force's primary trainer now is a turboprop, with a full time yaw damper to simulate jet-like control inputs from the git go. Why the AF feels it's too hard to train pilots that they don't have to worry about P-Factor, torque, etc even initially is beyond me.

Sometime in the 90s, I flew with an Air France 747 Captain in my C-170 on floats for a SES add on. He was a delight to fly with, but before we got in the plane the first time, he warned me that he'd never flown an airplane with a propeller. I was blown away, and asked him how that was even possible. He noted that he'd learned to fly in the Armee de l'Aire, and their primary trainer was a pure jet.

Now, the 170 on those big PeeKay B2300s was pretty yaw unstable anyway, but he bounced me off the side wall of that plane initially, laughing all the while, and yelling: "Stupeed French Jet Pilot, cannot fly for sheet!". Fortunately, he was a pretty quick study, and figured out what rudders are for in a couple lessons. But flying with him was an eye opener, and ultimately, a pure delight.

MTV
 
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Local PA-18 floatplane that demos for the tourist industry and offers training damaged today. No other info.

Gary
 

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ST. ANTHONY (KXNET) — A private plane contracted by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) crashed in a field south of County Road 136 and west of St. Anthony early Tuesday morning.

According to the Morton County Sheriff’s Office, the plane, a Piper Super Cub, was sent to dispatch coyotes at the landowner’s request and while flying, the plane stalled when the pilot was attempting to maneuver a turn at a low altitude, which is believed to have caused the crash.

The pilot and a passenger both sustained minor injuries but did not have to be transported for medical care. The plane received major damage.

The crash remains under investigation by the Morton County Sheriff’s Office and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).
 
ST. ANTHONY (KXNET) — A private plane contracted by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) crashed in a field south of County Road 136 and west of St. Anthony early Tuesday morning.

According to the Morton County Sheriff’s Office, the plane, a Piper Super Cub, was sent to dispatch coyotes at the landowner’s request and while flying, the plane stalled when the pilot was attempting to maneuver a turn at a low altitude, which is believed to have caused the crash.

The pilot and a passenger both sustained minor injuries but did not have to be transported for medical care. The plane received major damage.

The crash remains under investigation by the Morton County Sheriff’s Office and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

Another win for the coyotes. Glad the crew wasn’t badly injured…..

MTV
 
.....According to the Morton County Sheriff’s Office, the plane, a Piper Super Cub, was sent to dispatch coyotes at the landowner’s request and while flying, the plane stalled when the pilot was attempting to maneuver a turn at a low altitude, which is believed to have caused the crash......

Evolution in action...the coyotes have learned to shoot back!
 
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