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Norcal Javron build

rc dude

FRIEND
Index to posts by subject:
Explanation of the options I chose and my thinking behind them: Post #2
Getting a hangar and kit delivery: Post #9
Engine build part 1: Post #24
Engine build part 2: Post #25



About me:
I am currently a 28 year old mechanical engineer working in the aviation field. As a kid growing up under the traffic pattern to my local airport, I would hear the planes fly overhead all day, and I think that sparked my interest in aviation. Then years later (10 years ago today) I signed up for this website to do more research knowing that I was nowhere near able to afford getting my license or a plane. After I graduated with my bachelor's and covid hit I managed to get an engineering job at local company in the aviation field, and being surrounded by aviation and working with former and current pilots I decided there was no better time than the present to build a plane and get my license. So I started doing even more research, and weighed the pros and cons of building a Super Cub and building a Vans RV14. I decided that it is easier to fly cub across the country than it is to land a Vans on a sandbar, so Super Cub it is! Once I decided on a Javron kit thanks to Bill Rusk's great build thread, I called up Bill rusk and talked on the phone for a few hours about Javron kits, and went over the options that I wanted. I also visited Sam D during this time to check out his build, since he was the closest Javron builder that I could find. Then after ordering the kit, I realized I should probably get a license to fly it, so I joined EAA and looked up my local chapter, and I am slowly working my way to being a Pilot. So in summary, my aviation timeline looked a little like this:

10/22/13: Signed up for Supercub.org
10/16/21: Visited Sam D
12/24/21: Sent in my order form and deposit
5/28/22: First flight in a GA aircraft
12/29/22: Received kit
10/7/23: First solo flight

My goals:
My goals building this plane are to have a fun aircraft to fly around locally, as well as be able to take it on longer trips. I'd love to join Bill Rusk to Alaska one Summer, as well as fly it to Oshkosh, Idaho, etc. eventually I will be instrument rated, so I want an aircraft that is IFR capable to punch through a cloud layer, or shoot an approach to stay current. I don't intend on doing STOL competitions or anything like that, but want an aircraft that is capable of landing in tight spots, even though I'm sure it will be more capable than I am for a long time.

What I've ordered so far:
Javron super cub kit with the following options:
  • Epoxy prime instead of powdercoat
  • 4" wider fuselage
  • L21 windows
  • 3" extended gear
  • Full size flip up left window
  • Lowered inline thrust engine mount
  • Square wings with ailerons moved out and flaps enlarged
  • 24 gallon fuel tanks
  • PSTOL flap prep kit installed
  • Large lower baggage door
  • Upper baggage door
  • Float fittings welded on
  • Welded in cross brace tube from firewall
  • Tabs for cargo pod welded on
  • Overhead flap handle
  • Electronic elevator trim
  • 3" oversized tail feathers
  • Angled front door tube
  • Metal belly at tail and from firewall to landing gear
Aerosport Power IO-375 with the following options:


  • Ported and polished cylinders
  • Conical case with front mount governor
  • Hollow crank
  • Dual E-mags
  • Airflow performance fuel injection
  • B&C lightweight starter
  • Superior cold air induction

In the next post I will go through all the options as well as why I chose them.
 
Last edited:
Explanation of the options I chose and my thinking behind them:

Fuselage:

  • Epoxy prime instead of powdercoat - From my research on here, it seems like an epoxy primer and a urethane topcoat is better in the long term, and gets into the nooks and crevices better. I also plan on welding some tabs here and there, so this will allow me to grind to bare metal, weld, and repaint easier than powdercoat.
  • 4" wider fuselage - more elbow room and cargo space
  • Rear baggage lowered to sit on longerons - I saw this from Bill Rusk's build and liked the idea and weight loss.
  • L21 windows - I like the look and the visibility provided by the greenhouse windows, and I'm sure my passengers will as well.
  • 3" extended gear - More prop clearance and a higher static AOA.
  • Full size flip up left window - I wanted the ability to fly with both the left and right windows up.
  • Lowered inline thrust engine mount - improves takeoff performance from what I've read here.
  • Square wings with ailerons moved out and flaps enlarged - I like the look of the squared wingtips, plus they provide more wing area.
  • 24 gallon fuel tanks - carries more fuel when I need to, and mixed with a half cargo/half fuel pod will allow me to overfly Canada on the way to Alaska without stopping.
  • PSTOL flap prep kit installed - For future install of PSTOL flaps, I figured it would be easiest for Javron to install when the wings were originally assembled.
  • Large lower baggage door - Easier to load and unload cargo
  • Upper baggage door - more room for lightweight cargo
  • Float fittings welded on - I want amphib floats in the future
  • Welded in cross brace tube from firewall - Prevents the lower part of the firewall from collapsing in and up in case of a crash.
  • Tabs for cargo pod welded on - I will be making or buying a pod for this
  • Overhead flap handle - I like the look and easier accessibility of the overhead handle
  • Electronic elevator trim - Allows the trim to be controlled by the autopilot
  • 3" oversized tail feathers - More authority at slower speeds
  • Angled front door tube - easier entry and exit
  • Metal belly at tail and from firewall to landing gear - Easier cleanout and inspections

Engine:

  • IO-375 - Same weight as a parallel valve O-360, but with an additional 15hp (may even be lighter than some with lightweight mods I am doing)
  • Ported and polished cylinders - Free option offered by Aersport power to improve flow
  • Conical case with front mount governor - Conical mount to match the engine mount from Javron, and the front governor eliminates the interference it can have with the firewall and fuselage bracing.
  • Hollow crank - For future install of constant speed prop
  • Dual E-mags - Better fuel efficiency and power with electronic ignition, plus they will stay running in case of electrical loss due to an internal generator.
  • Airflow performance fuel injection - Better fuel efficiency and power, plus no worry for carb icing
  • B&C lightweight starter - Less weight on nose
  • Superior cold air induction - Better flow
 
  • Hollow crank - For future install of constant speed prop.
Do the constant speed prop from the beginning. There are some good lightweight options available. There is more to it than just changing props. The performance improvement is worth it, more power out of the hole on your sandbars coupled with a decent cruise speed which you will appreciate on your trips.
 
Excellent intro post. Thanks for posting. It may, (and probably will), help others.

Best of luck

Bill
 
Great intro. Please keep us up to date as your build goes.

If you havent got your alternator yet… you can save a few pounds by going with the skydynamics fly wheel and the rear mounted B&C.

I have no regrets whatsoever about the constant speed prop, highly recommend… but I do fly heavy often so a forward cg isn’t detrimental to me…. Usually. I do wish I had installed another door and carbon baggage area as far aft as I could. That would have allowed me to throw a few things that always go with the plane, like tools, air pump, tire patch kit, duck bills etc. wouldve helped with the CG in a useful way. Really hard to do that now that the plane is covered.
(Have the trailblazer prop with aerosport io-375)





Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org
 
Do the constant speed prop from the beginning. There are some good lightweight options available. There is more to it than just changing props. The performance improvement is worth it, more power out of the hole on your sandbars coupled with a decent cruise speed which you will appreciate on your trips.

I wish I could, but it isn't in the initial budget unless I win the lottery between now and when I'm ready to order a prop. The Sensenich ground adjustable is $4300, while the quote I got for a trailblazer and governor was around $21k. I'd rather put the money into things that are harder to upgrade in the future, then add upgrades once it's flying (mainly a CS prop and PSTOL flaps)

Excellent intro post. Thanks for posting. It may, (and probably will), help others.

Best of luck

Bill
Thank you Bill! If this thread can help someone one tenth as much as your thread helped me, I'll consider it a success.

Are the seatbelt attach points on the frame of a Javron?
Yes they are. When I'm at my hangar next I can grab a photo if you want.

Great intro. Please keep us up to date as your build goes.

If you havent got your alternator yet… you can save a few pounds by going with the skydynamics fly wheel and the rear mounted B&C.

I have no regrets whatsoever about the constant speed prop, highly recommend… but I do fly heavy often so a forward cg isn’t detrimental to me…. Usually. I do wish I had installed another door and carbon baggage area as far aft as I could. That would have allowed me to throw a few things that always go with the plane, like tools, air pump, tire patch kit, duck bills etc. wouldve helped with the CG in a useful way. Really hard to do that now that the plane is covered.
(Have the trailblazer prop with aerosport io-375)
I'm planning on going with the Monkworkz rear mounted generator. It only weighs 2.4lbs, and provides a full 30 amps sooner than a B&C, which was my second choice. It also doesn't need field power like an alternator, so it will start up with a dead battery. And since I am doing that, I am having Aerosport machine the pulley off the stock flywheel, since the cost to go from that to the Sky Dynamics flywheel was too high of a cost per lb for me. My current cost/lb I'm willing to spend is 150-200, depending on how easy it is to swap out in the future.
 
Hangar and kit delivery

While I was pondering which kit to get, I put my name on the waitlist for a hangar at my local airport, which was good timing because I managed to get a hangar only a couple weeks before my kit got delivered. The first order of business was to upgrade the lighting. The hangar had two fluorescent lights installed, but I unhooked them and install four LED highbay lights, and the difference was unbelievable. This upgrade has definitely come on handy when I work in there after work into the night. The previous hangar tenant also installed the outlets you see on the walls. Airport management was going to remove them since they weren't an approved modification, but I said I would take the hangar as-is, since the outlets spread around come in much handier than the one outlet normally provided.
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I also had a little help moving in my new toolbox.
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From there is was a waiting game as Jay packed up my kit, and handed it off to the shipper just before Christmas. From there Joel the shipper went back home to Wisconsin for Christmas, before starting the long drive to California. Surprisingly he made the trip in only 3 days, and was waiting at the airport for me at 7am December 29th. My family came out to help unload the trailer, as well as see what I had been talking nonstop about for the past year. I mounted a GoPro on a ladder to take a timelapse of the unloading process.


After that it was just a matter of stacking up all the boxes and covering everything with tarps to protect from any condensation that drips off the ceiling, but not before I got a photo of me sitting in my plane for the first time.
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All covered up for the rain that came later that day.
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The only thing i would rethink is the alternator. The space behind the engine gets really tight anyway and adding the alternator will make it worse. I have built 5 Javron Cubs and one certified and just started on another Javron. The last one I built I used the Sutton exhaust and really like it. I could never get adequate heat with the Vetterman and this one will blow you out of the cockpit. It also frees up space behind the engine. One other mod is to split the nosebowl, makes everything easier. You will love the PSTOL flaps but I hear with floats they are not so good. Bill? I've done two with constant speed props and I don't think I would do one for myself with one. The 84/43 Catto seems to work the best. The last Cub I built had a ground adjustable whirlwind and I'm not impressed with it for several reasons. I'm trying a Sensenich GS on this new one. I really like the Airtech fabric system and I've used them all. Have fun with it.
 

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If you are going to have autopilot I suspect you will also have 4 cylinder EGT/CHT monitor. This is very important in all planes but especially in high compression modded engines. High CHT'S from advance timing with electronic mags is a very common problem especially with high compression pistons. I would stick with stock timing for the first 25 hours then. See how they do with advanced. Sounds like a really well thought out plane.
DENNY
 
Wow, I am so glad I stumbled on this thread. I’m prolly heading up to see Jay and putting a deposit down next month and so the journey begins. I’m in aerospace manufacturing CAD/CAM programming, 35yrs old, I’m thinking you and I might approach this in similar ways lol. Looking forward to this build.

Sidenote: Fly Fly Fly. Get your ratings and instrument for sure. Even if you don’t plan on flying IFR a lot, it truly makes you a more knowledgeable and safer pilot. Make sure you get adequate time in a Tailwheel. It was very eye opening to me with a fresh PPL, thought I could fly anything…had the instructor not been in the back of that Champ, I’d have wound up in the ditch. Don’t stop honing your pilot skills while you build, lots of joy up there but lots of dangers too. I’m barely “dangerous” with 630hrsTT Multi CPL, 200 in a Baron, Seaplane, Tailwheel. If someone asked me to Solo a Supercub tomorrow, I prolly wouldn’t do it as I don’t have a lot of Tailwheel yet. But I will say, that tailwheel endorsement is game changing, all the sudden you have the cheat code in any trike you fly, crosswind landings are a nonevent.

Prop selection…I’m with Pittsdriver. As cool as constant speeds are, I wouldn’t want one in my personal plane. It’s added complexity, maintenance, and cost for a little bit of cruise, I don’t think it’s worth it. If you’re in a Supercub, especially with an autopilot, turn Otto on, enjoy the view, spend the money on a camera and take some pictures. If you’re trying to get places faster, get an RV, they go places faster :). Most Supercubs you will fly with will be fixed anyways, the CS guys will have to fly slower to stay with the pack.

I’ll stop rambling, this is going to be an epic young buck build!
 
Rascal, One big thing I will disagree with you with is the instrument rating making you a better pilot. It will teach you to operate within the system but won't do a lot for your piloting skills. One thing sorely lacking in flight instruction in the last ten of fifteen years is good stick and rudder skills. Most of the instructors are lacking in that department and have nothing to pass on so we get pilots that can fly to the PTS standards and that's it. Even the tailwheel instruction is lacking with places issuing tailwheel endorsements in just 3 or 4 hrs and of course they won't let you fly their airplane solo. I tell newly minted pilots that the best thing they can do is take a basic aerobatic course. It will do more for making you a better stick and rudder pilot than anything else you will ever do. Try and find a J-3, 140, Luscombe or Champ that you can rent and fly the heck out of them. They will teach how to get the most performance out of minimal power. Try and get at least 100hrs or more of tailwheel time while you are building. Remember when you finish you will have an airplane worth over $200,000 and I'm sure you will want to insure it. If you don't have much TW time the premiums will take your breath away. Just having a Supercub will not make you a backcountry pilot but just give you a tool to work with. Forget the big tires when you finish it and put 8.50's on it. You can go to any of the Idaho backcountry strips with 8.50's plus you will have an easier time learning to fly the airplane. One last thing about building your own airplane. You have to work on it every day. I don't care if it is only for 1/2hr do something on it to keep the momentum going. I have built 11 airplanes and done parts of several other airplanes in the last 15 years most of that while working full time at my main job. I'll quit ranting now and hope I helped you guys just getting started.
 
My 2 cents about split nose bowls. I thought they were a great idea until I had one installed. The unit I bought has stiffening flanges so deep behind the prop that with minimal eventual engine mount sag the bowl rubbed the ring gear. Also because of the flange, there was not enough room to install a backing plate for a spinner. Additionally, the clearance was so minimal that even after cutting a piece from the bowl with my leatherman during a hunting trip(rubbing backside of prop) I could only just slip a credit card in there. If one needs to get so deep into engine maintenance that the bowl must come off, just take the prop off too, you are not saving any time with the split.
 
That's why you get a Sabre prop spacer. I put a 1/2" spacer if the spinner backplate is flat and a 1" if it has a flange on the Cubs I build. Catto provides a 1".
 
Pitts, I said Knowledgeable and Safer, didn’t say better pilot for a reason. I completely agree with you that today’s flight training doesn’t make you a stick and rudder pilot, I think there should be an hour/landing requirement in the PPL. I don’t know what the Tailwheel endorsements you’ve seen that are lacking but mine was from an American Champion test pilot in a decathlon, aerobatics, upset recovery, it was extremely valuable. But the instrument rating really makes you understand the airspace system, procedures, regulations, and more importantly a greater understanding of weather and personal minimums. I don’t claim to know everything or be a backcountry pilot. But, my instrument rating taught me an awful lot about weather, and flight planning that would be extremely valuable to any VFR pilot.
I understand the insurance struggles all too well. High performance Multi premiums take my breath away lol. But I’m trying to get a jet job so It’s beneficial.
I couldn’t agree more on logging as much time in a champ or J3 but I honestly don’t know anyone who will rent one solo. I’m still trying to figure that part out, a local guy instructs out of a J3 and Family up in Osceola WI has the American Champion stuff. Hopefully us low time TW guys can get those hours before we go to insure our new super cubs.
I say again, not better pilot lol, the better pilot is a much deeper topic. Good quote to live by “A Superior Pilot uses his superior judgment to avoid situations which require the use of his superior skill” RIP Frank Borman, NASA Astronaut.
 
Agreed. However in my case the 12 is very nose heavy and I being so stubborn refused a spacer.
 
[/LIST]
Do the constant speed prop from the beginning. There are some good lightweight options available. There is more to it than just changing props. The performance improvement is worth it, more power out of the hole on your sandbars coupled with a decent cruise speed which you will appreciate on your trips.


I agree with Pete, go CS prop!
 
The only thing i would rethink is the alternator. The space behind the engine gets really tight anyway and adding the alternator will make it worse. I have built 5 Javron Cubs and one certified and just started on another Javron. The last one I built I used the Sutton exhaust and really like it. I could never get adequate heat with the Vetterman and this one will blow you out of the cockpit. It also frees up space behind the engine. One other mod is to split the nosebowl, makes everything easier. You will love the PSTOL flaps but I hear with floats they are not so good.

The Monkworkz alternator is much smaller than the B&C rear mounted ones, so it shouldn't take up as much space. As for the exhaust I'm planning on making a custom tuned exhaust to fit within the cowl I'm designing, since the normal Sutton or Vetterman won't work with my engine with the forward facing induction.


If you are going to have autopilot I suspect you will also have 4 cylinder EGT/CHT monitor. This is very important in all planes but especially in high compression modded engines. High CHT'S from advance timing with electronic mags is a very common problem especially with high compression pistons. I would stick with stock timing for the first 25 hours then. See how they do with advanced. Sounds like a really well thought out plane.
DENNY

Yep, my current plan is a full G3X glass panel, so I will be able to monitor all four cylinders at once. My engine also has the low compression pistons, so hopefully with stock timing on the PMAGs the CHTs don't get too high.


Wow, I am so glad I stumbled on this thread. I’m prolly heading up to see Jay and putting a deposit down next month and so the journey begins. I’m in aerospace manufacturing CAD/CAM programming, 35yrs old, I’m thinking you and I might approach this in similar ways lol. Looking forward to this build.

Sidenote: Fly Fly Fly. Get your ratings and instrument for sure. Even if you don’t plan on flying IFR a lot, it truly makes you a more knowledgeable and safer pilot. Make sure you get adequate time in a Tailwheel. It was very eye opening to me with a fresh PPL, thought I could fly anything…had the instructor not been in the back of that Champ, I’d have wound up in the ditch. Don’t stop honing your pilot skills while you build, lots of joy up there but lots of dangers too. I’m barely “dangerous” with 630hrsTT Multi CPL, 200 in a Baron, Seaplane, Tailwheel. If someone asked me to Solo a Supercub tomorrow, I prolly wouldn’t do it as I don’t have a lot of Tailwheel yet. But I will say, that tailwheel endorsement is game changing, all the sudden you have the cheat code in any trike you fly, crosswind landings are a nonevent.

I hope you start a thread once you get your kit, being in CAD/CAM I'm sure you'll have a nice selection of custom machined parts. I run a small machine shop out of my garage doing prototype/small batch projects for my day job, so I am already designing custom parts for my build. As for the instrument and further ratings, I am planning on getting my tailwheel immediately after my PPL, if I don't get the rating beforehand. And then I want to immediately jump into instrument training to keep the learning momentum going, and eventually work my way up to CFI so I can eventually teach the young eagles at my EAA chapter.


I've done two with constant speed props and I don't think I would do one for myself with one. The 84/43 Catto seems to work the best. The last Cub I built had a ground adjustable whirlwind and I'm not impressed with it for several reasons. I'm trying a Sensenich GS on this new one. I really like the Airtech fabric system and I've used them all. Have fun with it.
Prop selection…I’m with Pittsdriver. As cool as constant speeds are, I wouldn’t want one in my personal plane. It’s added complexity, maintenance, and cost for a little bit of cruise, I don’t think it’s worth it. If you’re in a Supercub, especially with an autopilot, turn Otto on, enjoy the view, spend the money on a camera and take some pictures. If you’re trying to get places faster, get an RV, they go places faster :). Most Supercubs you will fly with will be fixed anyways, the CS guys will have to fly slower to stay with the pack.
I agree with Pete, go CS prop!

My engine is currently built for fixed pitch/GA props, but eventually I want to go with a Hartzell Trailblazer or MT constant speed prop. My engine is easily converted to c/s with removing one freeze plug, installing a npt plug, and bolting the governor on. But who knows, maybe I'll like the ground adjustable one so much it stays on. Since Catto is coming out with a ground adjustable prop now as well, I might give it a try if it is comparable to the Sensenich one in terms of performance. Since Catto is local(ish) to me, I might go tour their facility and see their new prop one of these days.
 
Dude, I’m a young eagles pilot and it makes me so happy that’s on your mind, it’s one of the most rewarding things you can do in Aviation. Good for you, love your plan. I’ll def be starting a thread for mine ;)
 
Dude, I’m a young eagles pilot and it makes me so happy that’s on your mind, it’s one of the most rewarding things you can do in Aviation. Good for you, love your plan. I’ll def be starting a thread for mine ;)

By young eagles pilot do you mean you got your license through the young eagles program, or you volunteer as a pilot for young eagle days? The chapter I'm part of does two scholarships per year for young eagles to get their licenses, with my flight instructor teaching them. But since he is getting up in age, I want to be able to fill in when he retires, as well as fly at all the young eagle days I can.
 
I’m a volunteer pilot. I started flying kids in the Cherokee as soon as I could after I got my PPL. My first GA flight was through the young eagles program.
 
Engine Build

Engine ordering:
I started contacting engine build shops while I was waiting for my kit to arrive from Javron, just to get an idea of price and lead times. Once I decided on a 370/375 engine, I directed my inquiries to the two companies that I had heard good thing about, Aerosport Power and Titan engines. The quotes I received from them were both comparable within a couple thousand dollars, and both companies offered build schools for me to travel to them and assemble my own engine, but Titan was unable to do a conical mount case with a front governor, while Aerosport Power was. So finally after my kit was paid in full with Javron, I directed my funds towards an engine deposit, since the lead times I had received were 12+ months. I placed my deposit with Aerosport Power in January of this year, with the expectation that the part would be ready for me to do the build school around February 2024. But towards the end of July I got an email saying that they had received all the parts sooner than expected, and asked if I wanted to move my build school date up sooner, which I decided to do in order to beat the snow in Canada. So my build school date was set for November 14-16. In the meantime Aerosport Power was busy prepping all of the parts, getting it painted the color I chose, and making sure everything would be ready for when I arrived.

The drive to Canada:
When I was planning my drive to Canada, I contacted Bill Rusk to ask if I could swing by Idaho on my way to meet him in person, after having many phone calls and messages back and forth as I was ordering my kit. He was gracious enough to welcome my dad and I, and even let us stay in his hangar for the night. So on the Friday before my build school my dad ad I set off driving North from Sacramento, and made it a little over halfway through Oregon before stopping for the night. Saturday we drove the rest of the way to Sandpoint Idaho where we met Bill at the airport, and he showed up around his hangar ad I finally got to see his cub in person. He even let me sit in it, which was my first time ever in a Super Cub (unless you count sitting in my fuselage making airplane noises). Unfortunately the weather didn't allow for a flight in his cub, but it was still great talking to him and soaking up as much information as I could.

Me and Bill Rusk:
20231111_192457.jpg
After taking him out to dinner it was time to hit the bed, since we were planning on leaving early in the morning to make it all the way up to Kamloops BC. On Sunday we made it through customs into Canada, hitting a little snow first going through the upper part of Washington. Once we made it up to the Okanagan valley the sun had come out, which made the rest of the drive nice all the way to Kamloops.

Build School:
The build school started at 8am on Tuesday, and when we arrived all of the parts were laid out on a rolling cart. We were also introduced to the technician who we would be working with, and then the build started. I'll let the pictures throughout the build tell most of the story.

The engine parts at the start:
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The build progressed quickly, starting with the crankshaft, and adding the nose seal, counterweights, and the connecting rods:
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Then it was time to prep the crankcase halves and the camshaft, followed by laying the crankshaft in and joining the halves:
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After the case halves were torqued together, it was time to move onto the rear accessory case:
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After the sump and fuel servo were installed next, it was time to start prepping the pistons and cylinders:
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Followed by installing them one at a time onto the engine:
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This is what it looked like at the end of the first build school day:
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Part 2 of the engine build continued in the next post...
 

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Engine build part #2

The second day of the build school started with installing the pushrods and rockers, which took a little time to find the correct pushrod length to have the correct clearance. Once that was solved it was time to move on to the intake tubes:
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Followed by the Emag installation and timing:
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And lastly bending the fuel lines from the fuel divider to the injectors:
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After that the engine was fully assembled:
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The next step was to roll it to the adjacent room where the test tuck was parked, and start prepping it to be mounted to the test stand:
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After an hour or two it was mounted up to the test stand, we filled it with oil, hooked up al the sensors, mounted a prop, and it was ready for the first start:
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After driving the test truck out to an open area at the airport, the test technician hit the starter twice to get oil primed throughout the engine, then it fired right up:

The engine run in started at 1000rpm, then would increase every 5 minutes until it got up to 2700rpm, with the test technician writing down all the engine parameters at every step. We watched the engine run while standing out in the field next to it until the sun went down and it got too cold, at which point my dad and I got in our truck and parked facing the motor so I could continue to watch it. At 5pm the testing stopped for the day after 3 hours of running. The next morning at 8am the truck rolled out tot he test field again for one more hour of break-in. Aerosport usually does two hours of break in plus the acceptance run, but I asked if they could do an additional two hours just to help get the break-in further along, which they did for a reasonable price. Here is a clip of the motor that morning running at full throttle:

After the break in runs were complete, the oil was changed and another test technician took it back out for the acceptance run, recording his own data to make sure it matched the initial data. Once that was done it headed back inside where we took it off the test stand, cut open the oil filter, fogged the cylinders, and bolted it down to a pallet for transport.
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All that was left was for us to come back the following day, after it was gone over again by the technicians to double check all the torque values, cleaned, and packaged in the crate for the trip home. When we got there the crate was loaded into the truck, and we were on our way back to California.
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The trip back was uneventful, and the following day we got the engine unloaded in my hangar:
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Now that I have gone through the build school and have my engine, I can't say enough great things about Aerosport Power and the people that work there. All of my emails back and forth while I was configuring my engine and getting quotes were responded to quickly, and the build school was absolutely worth doing. The only thing I would change if I were to do it again would be to go in the summer, since it was a little chilly and the sun set so early there wasn't much to go see at the end of each day.

And just for fun I did a timelapse with my gopro during the build. (The fluorescent lights did cause some horizontal banding and flickering, so you may not want to watch it if you are sensitive to flickering lights)
Day 1:

Day 2:
 

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You will be happy with the Aerosport Power engine. You will really like the Emags with the fuel injection. It makes hot starts a breeze. I have had them do four for me and we have four more here on the field. The build school is something I never had the chance to do but would be fun. I had the same problem with engine lead times and Darren called me out of the blue a couple months ago and said they got several kits in so I jumped on it and had an engine in a month. I had a Cub kit sitting here for over a year and I wasn't going to start building it without an engine.
 
What type of suspension and tires are you planning?
I am planning on running TK1 main gear shocks and their tailwheel assembly. I chose their shocks just because they are local to me and let me come tour their shop while I was waiting for my kit to arrive. For the tailwheel I was initially going to go with the Scott 3200 tailwheel and Acme Aero stinger, but looking at the weights that combo would be around 15 pounds (8 for Scott 3200 and 7 for stinger). The TK1 tailwheel weighs 12.5-13.5 depending what tire you choose, and it's cheaper which is a nice bonus.

For tires I currently have 8.50s mounted to roll the fuselage around, but want to go with the Goodyear 26" tires. Since my home airport is paved without a grass runway, the Goodyears should last much longer than bushwheels would, and be plenty good for the off airport landings I plan on doing for the foreseeable future until I get more experience.
 
Acme Black Ops are the best but I like the T-3 over the Acme TW. I have the Goodyears on a couple of airplanes and they wear like iron on asphalt. Be careful to run them at least 15lbs or they will turn on the rim and rip out the valve stem. Better yet drill some holes in the rims and use #10 sheet metal screws in the bead like we used to do with the off road tires and big slicks. Did you order your Garmin stuff yet. If not we need to talk.Just started painting the latest build. Started in October so it's rolling right along.
 
Acme Black Ops are the best but I like the T-3 over the Acme TW. I have the Goodyears on a couple of airplanes and they wear like iron on asphalt. Be careful to run them at least 15lbs or they will turn on the rim and rip out the valve stem. Better yet drill some holes in the rims and use #10 sheet metal screws in the bead like we used to do with the off road tires and big slicks. Did you order your Garmin stuff yet. If not we need to talk.Just started painting the latest build. Started in October so it's rolling right along.
Thanks for the info on the Goodyears. I was thinking of using some screws to secure the bead, and it's good to hear its been done before.

I have not ordered the Garmin avionics yet, I was planning/budgeting to place that order sometime this summer. With how fast electronics advance, I want to wait until the last minute accounting for lead time in case something better gets released.
 
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