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Float flying waders

ag-pilot

GONE WEST
Mt.
Sorry for all the questions this deal has come up fast so I'm ill prepared.

What kind of waders do you float guys like to fly in? I want something that I can buy about anywhere when I get to RI. I'm thinking hip waders out of cordura or something like.

Thanks
Dave
 
I used standard rubber waders for years and often was too warm, even with them rolled down. I started using NEOS River Trekker lightweight waders that slip over my regular shoes. Sometimes I wouldn't wear them, depending on the beaches/docks, but I always took them. Very light and comfortable. Not good for lots of wading, but I only wanted them for flying.

http://www.overshoe.com/recreational/products/detail.php?s=RTK8

Stewart
 
waders

Stewart, Thanks for the idea, How deep can you stay dry with them? I think 18" -24" should do me fine or at least I hope so. Not knowing exactly where I will be landing makes it a bit of a challenge and I hate wet feet this time of year.

dave
 
I wear light chest waders because the lakes in this part of the country have few beaches and mostly fairly fast drop-offs and muddy bottoms. I don't want to diddle-daddle getting tied up, worrying about whether the water's going to be over my knees or crotch. I roll them down while flying and take them off when squared away ashore.
 
agpilot,

They pull up to your crotch and they're perfectly waterproof all the way up. Or you can roll them down with much less bulk than regular waders. They just aren't as durable as regular waders for fishing or hunting. I liked them in the airplane. Plus, you can slip out of them and be race ready in a snap. Just get the sizing right to wear the shoes you plan to wear under them.

I considered using some Simms gore-tex waist-high wading pants that I already had with some cheap canvas Keds on my feet. Too hot.

Stewart
 
I use Cabelas cordura hip boots with felt bottoms....because I had them for steelhead fishing and I thought they would be great for flying....they are super light and can be easily rolled down to fly.
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I would second Stewart's recommendation of the NEOS River Trekkers. For amphibious ops, they are the bee's knees, so to speak. As Stewart noted, they aren't as durable as regular hip boots, but they go on over your regular shoes and pack tight.

Otherwise, just get a good set of hip boots. Depending on how much you plan to use them, get either really good ones, or the cheapest you can find.

I really prefer ankle fit hip boots if I'm using something other than the NEOS. The ankle fits stay on your feet even in super sucking muck. And, trust me when I say I've experienced more than my share of that stuff.

MTV
 
I see the reason you need waders,,,, looking through those glasses it is quite obvious that the shallow water you floated up in is going to be about waist deep....

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Do it the Okie way and save some money and put your tennis shoes over a couple of garbage bags... Duct tape them around your leg.....You probably wont keep the plane till you get home anyway.. :D
 
Simm,s , Montana headquarters, Lifetime guaranty, They have replaced my Simms raincoat after a year. The best people to deal with.
 
Dave, go ahead and get the waders. You can always where them to protect your shoes when you happen to be around Eaton. :eek:
 
Waders

I second the Cabela's fabric and rubber boot waders with felt soles. Light and fairly compact to carry in the plane. They stand up to a lot of folding, fit at the ankle (important for mud bottoms) and the tops fold down easily. But wear socks or they will stick when you try to pull them on. Don't envy people who find chest waders necessary. Ever try swimming with waders on?
 
I could have flown floats 90% of the time in Brawnys or Xtra Tuffs and not needed more. Wing and tail ropes left on the plane make wading out mostly unnecessary. You can nose into the beach and still spin it around to tail in without getting wet, even in river current. They also make it easy for someone on the dock to catch you when taxiing in. Leave them on the plane all the time when on floats. You'll never be sorry you did.

Another thing I did was to have a line with a spliced loop attached to the rear cleat, run the line slightly snug around the front cleat, and then the other end with a spliced loop onto the same rear cleat. I could take one end loose, with a snap of a wrist have the line off the front cleat, and I had good tail tie-up ropes. If I needed to control the plane in a river I'd leave the rope over the front cleat and I could steer the nose around from behind. Very handy. Use hollow braid nylon so the rope floats.

I've never worn felts in an airplane when I wasn't expecting to fish when I landed. Felt soles hold more water and dirt than you can imagine, even in clean gravel-bottom streams. And the threat of spreading parasites between bodies of water is making felts a thing of the past.

Stewart
 
Waders

Good point about the felts. Guess it depends on where you operate. Slippery rock is a problem for me and felts are helpful. I don't mind a little clean water in the cabin (might feel differently if I had carpets) but I scrape off any mud or sand with a paddle, before I get back in the plane. Parasites!! Guess I'd better get a bottle of Lysol to go with the bug spray.
 
WIGGY'S
Not just for sleep bags anymore.

Easy on/off, even in the cockpit (so you don't haft'a wear 'em all day!!) and roll up in a very light & compact package. Too lightweight for any hiking, but perfect for jumping off the floats. I bought some for the neighbor & he loves 'em too.

I'd guess about 1# & will fit in your seatback pocket (If it's not already full of "stuff". :)
 
My only wader experience is from fishing. I have a pair of Simms G3 gore-tex waders that are incredibly well built, and the price tag reflected that. :eek: They are the kind of product though that I feel could really last me my entire fishing career, and really are a pleasure to wear (on the river at least.) Light, breathable, and a neoprene stocking foot so you can wear a normal boot or shoe with it. The only complaints I've heard about Simms is that their customer service isn't so hot compared to Patagonia, for example.

Right now you can get a pair of Albright Trinity stocking foot waders from Albright Fishing for $70 I think.

Perhaps the boot foot is preferred for flying over the stocking foot, so you can slip out of them easily and into your flying shoes?

I'd say that a lightweight chest wader is the way to go. Anybody who tries a hip wader will prob be thinking the same thing the instant they get water down their leg. :) Plus, you can always roll the chest waders down to your waist.
 
In 15 years of float flying I never once had water over my waders. I can't say the same for my 5' tall wife. I've rescued my wife from sunk waders more than once while she was helping control a drifting plane in river currents and wind. It wasn't so much from her lack of vertical stature as lack of body weight to fight the forces of nature moving an airplane. That has a lot to do with why we now remain on tires. :lol:

Stewart
 
Stewart,

That was my experience as well, after 8 years float flying in Kodiak, where everything is rock.

Then I moved to FAI, and did a lot of float flying on the Yukon Flats....

Go visit the Yukon Flats if you want to meet up with some serious boot sucking muck.... :x I've had to "swim" or crawl through muck to shore with a line, cause the plane wouldn't get any closer, and you could not stand up in the stuff.

And, there are leeches there as well.....lots of leeches.

There are times, as you say, when operating on tires makes a lot of sense. 8)

MTV
 
For the best 'stay on your foot' wader, and traction, try Cabela's with the strap/clip that goes over the arch and tightens up the ankle area.

For comfort, I took to wearing surf shoes and shorts. Sometimes sandles. Carry a polar fleece pant set in the plane for cool times.

My foot area is so warm most of the year that I had to go almost barefoot to keep my feet from burning up, and I was always over depth for waders in the different areas I was parking...
 
For the best 'stay on your foot' wader, and traction, try Cabela's with the strap/clip that goes over the arch and tightens up the ankle area.

For comfort, I took to wearing surf shoes and shorts. Sometimes sandles. Carry a polar fleece pant set in the plane for cool times.

My foot area is so warm most of the year that I had to go almost barefoot to keep my feet from burning up, and I was always over depth for waders in the different areas I was parking...
 
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