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Flap handle STC?

bob turner

Registered User
One of my students is getting ready to modify his Super Cub. He plans on the Keller slotted flaps (I approve) and wants the flap handle in the overhead (not sure I approve).

I am a long-legged dude, so never had much trouble with the stock handle, but he apparently does - so help him out. Will he also need a good helmet?

A good guy - he starts with Southwest next month. 24, with a degree from USC. Impressive.
 
Does that mod come with the STC? Just rig the stick to the right if needed or bend the flap handle.
DENNY
 
An overhead handle allows drive rods and bell cranks. Eliminates cables and pulleys. It’s a great improvement. I wish I did it in my plane. Someday I still might.
 
How do legs make pulling flaps easier? It takes reach. Clocking a standard handle isn’t difficult, but I’m a fan of the overhead thing IF he can get it approved. Especially as the Keller flaps get longer.
 
Shorten the handle if it is original length.

If he is a working pilot, and has a certified plane, he needs to stay within the bounds of legal modifications or his job could easily be at risk.
 
I wanted overhead with 'direct drive' but ended up getting what was available so it is standard on the floor (but wide-body so moved outboard).

I was used to reaching the handle in my '63 Cub (never ever, should have sold) but it is nice to not have to move the head down or reach too far to get at them. Also I will have the PSTOL (Keller) that are slightly extended, don't want a shorter handle due to the effort of that last notch, if anything longer would help - of course just be slow when you deploy as to not bend anything anyway.. squirrell - the whole point of my post is coming..

Pondering something like this (image below) a D shaped handle welded to the straight handle that part way down and is easier to reach for that first notch or so, then slide hand up the handle for the harder pulls. Drawback no button or trigger on the D part for release. Or (looks dorky) just a second handle welded on at an angle with a second button - some monkeying around but could probably do a dual button release set up.

Has anyone messed with something like this to confirm it is a silly idea or? Being able to do this goofy stuff makes me miss my '63 certified less :)

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I've got my shoulder harness adjusted so I can just reach this loop with my finger to get the first notch. It is a shortened handle with PSTOL flapsPXL_20230321_154113651.jpeg
 

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Nice!
I'll have to sit in the seat (when I put it back in) and play with best positioning. I'm thinking a loop farther down the handle but extending toward me more. Of course the loop would be awkward and too low eventually with anything but that first pull or so. Be nice to have dual handle with a release button (or trigger) if wanting to pop them on then release and raise flaps slowly after TO without having to bend too much also. Much to ponder.
I've got my shoulder harness adjusted so I can just reach this loop with my finger to get the first notch. It is a shortened handle with PSTOL flapsView attachment 65171
 
Hmm.. I found the guy who made the handle posting on backcountry pilot but was some years ago. His website links are all dead (ezflaphandle.com). He did indeed make a PA-18 style but I can't find an image yet either, even though it is for sale at Aircraft Spruce EU.

EDIT.. and LOL, the thread on BackcountryPilot turned into a pissing match mess.
 
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I added Airframes Alaska PSTOL flaps to my Cub recently. As noted above it took quite a bit of effort to release that last notch. I had a look at the catch mechanism and it had very sharp stamped metal edges. I smoothed those edges a bit some some fine sandpaper and sort of polished the surfaces like one would a rifle trigger. Made a noticeable difference,, much smoother and easier to release now.
 
Hmm.. I found the guy who made the handle posting on backcountry pilot but was some years ago. His website links are all dead (ezflaphandle.com). He did indeed make a PA-18 style but I can't find an image yet either, even though it is for sale at Aircraft Spruce EU.

For the experimental folks, I would bet it would not be that hard to 3D print something.
 
Cub flap levers don’t need the button pushed to pull flaps on. I pull the first notch (easy effort) near the base of the lever, then the rest is easy to reach. Retracting has never been any problem. Much easier to manage than Skywagon flaps.
 
Thanks for tip stid2677, I don't have my wings yet - but I do have a box with some beautiful PSTOL flaps in the garage.
 
Big flaps aren’t hard to use in the first couple of notches. It’s at full flaps when effort is high and the flap lever is near vertical when it gets challenging. That’s a very awkward position to pull against the pressure of the flaps, and the longer the handle the better.
 
Yes, that is why was thinking the loop or whatever just for easy reach to get started then you move hand up to the regular portion. The extension would get too far behind on side to have any leverage as you say.
Big flaps aren’t hard to use in the first couple of notches. It’s at full flaps when effort is high and the flap lever is near vertical when it gets challenging. That’s a very awkward position to pull against the pressure of the flaps, and the longer the handle the better.
 
I think the problem is that if your legs are short, the handle interferes with your knee and the stick on strong left crosswind landings. I personally have never noticed it, and I seek crosswind landings. Modern pilots don’t seem to need ailerons in crosswinds - students over 45 transitioning to tailwheel have never even heard of using ailerons into the wind, and require literally hundreds of landings before it becomes automatic.

Picture it - left crosswind. Touchdown normal, appropriate cross-control, with left main and tailwheel touching down first.
Then, the nose starts off to the left, and the pilot shoves the stick to the right to compensate. Next step - groundloop.

But I digress - thanks for the many answers. So, no STC for my soon-to-be-helmeted student.
 
I think the problem is that if your legs are short, the handle interferes with your knee and the stick on strong left crosswind landings.

I don't think my legs are short and they certainly aren't fat. Still cursed the PA-18-180 flap handle a few times when I found left stick blocked in a crosswind landing. I now prefer the high left position of the FX-3 flap handle although it did take a while to get used to it.
 
I think the problem is that if your legs are short, the handle interferes with your knee and the stick on strong left crosswind landings. I personally have never noticed it, and I seek crosswind landings. Modern pilots don’t seem to need ailerons in crosswinds - students over 45 transitioning to tailwheel have never even heard of using ailerons into the wind, and require literally hundreds of landings before it becomes automatic.

Picture it - left crosswind. Touchdown normal, appropriate cross-control, with left main and tailwheel touching down first.
Then, the nose starts off to the left, and the pilot shoves the stick to the right to compensate. Next step - groundloop.

But I digress - thanks for the many answers. So, no STC for my soon-to-be-helmeted student.

A high time C-46 guy told me always thinks “Drive it into the ditch” for aileron use in crosswinds.

The “EZ-Flap” thing went sideways when the guy who designed it claimed that Cessnas and Pipers were dangerous till his creation appeared. It was a “spirited” discussion.

MTV
 
I'm looking forward to finding out how it feels with the wide-body, and being mounted out at the sidewall, those two should give me considerable more left aileron than I had in original cub. Can always try increasing the throw like Bill did with an extension on the bottom of aileron torque tube arm - of course tradeoff is heavier feel. I think I will not mess with that for now.
I don't think my legs are short and they certainly aren't fat. Still cursed the PA-18-180 flap handle a few times when I found left stick blocked in a crosswind landing. I now prefer the high left position of the FX-3 flap handle although it did take a while to get used to it.
 
I used to fly standard flaps with a short flap handle, after putting Airframes flaps on I had to put a stock handle to be able to dump full flaps. I have my seat as far forward as I can due to my height. Wish I would have had these flap 40 years ago!


Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org
 
I used to fly standard flaps with a short flap handle, after putting Airframes flaps on I had to put a stock handle to be able to dump full flaps. I have my seat as far forward as I can due to my height. Wish I would have had these flap 40 years ago!


Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org

Why do you need the longer handle to dump flaps? At landing speed I can operate my flaps easily enough. It takes muscle at approach speeds. I’m trying to understand your comment.

Thanks.
 
Hi Stewart, I have my seat all the way forward and had a very short flap handle, I fly hunters etc. mainly and had difficulty when having to do a go around on someplace I had not landed before.


Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org
 
I've flown two different Cubs with stock flaps and the shortened handle, and hated both. No way I'd do that to a perfectly good airplane.

MTV
 
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