• If You Are Having Trouble Logging In with Your Old Username and Password, Please use this Forgot Your Password link to get re-established.
  • Hey! Be sure to login or register!

CubCrafters Releases G3X Integrated Infrared Camera for Backcountry Situational Awareness

SJ

Staff member
Northwest Arkansas
c326e1f2e81ce272a2dd589623e317c6.jpg


CubCrafters is today publicly releasing a new infrared camera option for aircraft equipped with Garmin’s G3X avionics packages. This new wing-mounted forward looking IR camera is weatherproof and operates in a wide range of environmental conditions. No additional avionics hardware is required, the camera displays directly on the G3X main screen, and has been designed to display real time forward looking long wave infrared (LWIR) video with the same field of view, at the same image scale, and with the same horizon as Garmin’s built-in synthetic vision, but with much more detail.



The two images are displayed side-by-side for game changing situational awareness in low light or low visibility backcountry flying scenarios:
 
For those days when synthetic vision isn't quite good enough to sneak through a fogged-in pass. Enough is enough.
 
No offense, but I simply cannot imagine any situation where I would “need” this?

I mean, judging by the right side of the display, it looks like it would be handy when attacking the Death Star.

In all seriousness, while one should absolutely avoid intentionally flying into low/no visibility while in the mountains, I'm sure there are a few people who had died in such situations who might have liked this option in that moment. I doubt I'll ever own such kit, and decision making will always be the best line of safety, but I can see why some would be interested.
 
but I can see why some would be interested.
I can also see where some will use it and rely upon it to go places where they should not. Every time new electronics are added to a cockpit's collection, there are more pilots who concentrate on the instrumentation and neglect to look out the window. This has been happening ever since radio navigation and T&B instruments were first installed. There will be fatal accidents which will be caused by a false dependency of this new "toy".
 
It will sure help the accuracy and ability for low level bombing runs...

The one place I can actually think it would be of help might be flying around in smog down south where you got windmills and the 2,500' tall antennas with wires strung at angles from top to the ground... if it will show the wires.

It does get exhausting looking at the private pilot flying his two seat STOL plane that has something like this on the panel, then has a GPS hanging from each side of the V brace, one on each side of the windshield and another one on top of the panel, the only visibility the pilot has is the skylight!

At some point the non electric planes become safer than trying to manage all that stuff.
 
Lots of good reasons to have it if the mission calls for it. Game tracking/Search and rescue/Low level night operations/Smoke/ect I knew a doc in TX had a similar unit in his Bearhawk because came into his home strip in the dark a lot and had a lot of issue with wildlife on the strip. His unit was a lot smaller. Go to the site and look at the size of the unit hanging below the plane. it is huge!!
DENNY
 
Denny where are you seeing the unit? Tac Aero had flown a military contract with a very expensive camera hanging below the fuselage but my understanding from the press release was this is a wing mounted unit? Hadn’t seen pics.

I see the value in it, but I cant imagine the cost.


Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org
 
I vowed (last March) to not get into any more situations where such a device would be useful...

Although I don't fly at night much, that is where it could be handy especially in an ER situation.

sj
 
It will sure help the accuracy and ability for low level bombing runs...

The one place I can actually think it would be of help might be flying around in smog down south where you got windmills and the 2,500' tall antennas with wires strung at angles from top to the ground... if it will show the wires.

It does get exhausting looking at the private pilot flying his two seat STOL plane that has something like this on the panel, then has a GPS hanging from each side of the V brace, one on each side of the windshield and another one on top of the panel, the only visibility the pilot has is the skylight!

At some point the non electric planes become safer than trying to manage all that stuff.

Or returning to the WAD. :oops:

Glenn
 
You know, I recall a day that we were flying into a strip here in AR. We were in the pattern below the peaks and I got blasted by the sun. I couldn't see anything out the front window. Something like this could have been helpful.

Just sayin'.

cafi
 
Denny where are you seeing the unit? Tac Aero had flown a military contract with a very expensive camera hanging below the fuselage but my understanding from the press release was this is a wing mounted unit? Hadn’t seen pics.

I see the value in it, but I cant imagine the cost.

This is what I was looking at. https://www.hoodtechaero.com/ it would be nice if they had a small unit.
DENNY
 
I agree with the naysayers! Giving pilots the ability to see through smoke, dust, and haze in the backcountry? What a silly idea. And being able to actually see terrain while flying at night, who would want that? Grandpa did it with just a six pack and a sectional, heck yeah! That's all I want! And squinting into the sun low on the horizon trying to see if those are elk on the runway or just bugs on my windshield, man, that's living large! SAR, wildlife management, fire patrol, law enforcement, etc. God gave us that ole Mark 1 eyeball, shouldn't ever need anything else!

CC-IR-Camera-terrain-2048x1536.jpg


CC-IR-Camera-shadow-2048x1536.jpg


CC-IR-Camera-night-2048x1536.jpg


Just poking fun.. and here's [FONT=&quot]↑[/FONT] a few better pictures of the functionality.
 
Last edited:
C’mon Brad, leave poor old Mark out of this. You know he doesn’t always see clearly.
[emoji23]


Transmitted from my FlightPhone on fingers… [emoji849]
 
That’s actually a cool unit. Do you know if Garmin is ever going to make it for certified aircraft?

It’s not a Garmin unit. It’s someone’s IR camera connected to the G3X via the standard video inputs.


Transmitted from my FlightPhone on fingers… [emoji849]
 
Can it see through snow or fog? Many's the day when that would been nice.

Gary

I agree.
Would need to see in person - based solely on photos it’s hard to tell how much fog or areas of little temp difference work. Note the Clarity difference between night and fog or smoke (?) in these photos.
IMG_6096.JPG
IMG_6097.JPG


Transmitted from my FlightPhone on fingers… [emoji849]
 

Attachments

  • IMG_6096.JPG
    IMG_6096.JPG
    176 KB · Views: 45
  • IMG_6097.JPG
    IMG_6097.JPG
    125.5 KB · Views: 45
Wasn't there an accident in Idaho a few years ago where a Pacer flew into a canyon wall that was in the shadows?
 
We lost a 180 driver several years ago who apparently flew into a hill when he was blinded by a rising sun. Not sure what an infra-red camera sees when it is looking at the sun.

Hey Brad, maybe if you cleaned the windshield...
 
I agree with the naysayers! Giving pilots the ability to see through smoke, dust, and haze in the backcountry? What a silly idea. And being able to actually see terrain while flying at night, who would want that? Grandpa did it with just a six pack and a sectional, heck yeah! That's all I want! And squinting into the sun low on the horizon trying to see if those are elk on the runway or just bugs on my windshield, man, that's living large! SAR, wildlife management, fire patrol, law enforcement, etc. God gave us that ole Mark 1 eyeball, shouldn't ever need anything else!

Just poking fun...
I'll take credit for being one of your naysayers and recognize the sarcasm. Actually much of the new now becoming available technology, is great stuff. Some of what I've said was meant to be in jest. Much of the rest was meant to be a slap upon the side of the head for those who go to places and into conditions which they ought not to go. Heavens knows I've done my share of dumb stuff over the past 65+ years of aviating. My comments have been based upon where I've been, and what I've seen while being a CFI, a DPE, a member of multi pilot crews having sat in all three seats, and flying solo, all while looking in the mirror and watching the other pilots from my seat. The main purpose of my remarks has been to create awareness in others. If I can get the message to just one pilot who listens to me, and doesn't bend his machine and hurt his body.. then my comments will have been worthwhile. I'll not bore you will personal stories in which this new device could have helped, or could have encouraged me to dig a deeper hole than the one I was in. There were many.
 
The synthetic vision that’s standard on a G3X is more than enough to keep a VFR pilot out of places he shouldn’t go. It serves CC’s purpose to sell expensive add-ons. That doesn’t mean they make sense. I’ll leave the FLIR and Night Vision to the professionals who are trained to use them. That’s just my opinion. I couldn’t care less what other guys spend their money on.
 
You know, I recall a day that we were flying into a strip here in AR. We were in the pattern below the peaks and I got blasted by the sun. I couldn't see anything out the front window. Something like this could have been helpful.

Just sayin'.

cafi

Land the other way.
 
Land the other way.

My uphill strip (too steep to land downhill) faces a 9200' ridge to the east, right behind. I've learned to NEVER try and land early in the morning, at least when the sun just has cleared the ridge. There's about a half hour window...., once it's a bit higher it's just normal sun in your eyes, but for some reason it's totally blinding for a short period. My workaround is to not do it, wait a few minutes, or land before it clears the ridge. There is probably some optical science reason why this happens, all I know is it's a dramatic difference, a make it or break it difference, in just a few minutes.
Flying with this thing would be like how I operate my crane when using it's high def camera system, with a 12" monitor in the op cab, it took a bit of getting used to, but I now work just as efficiently when just staring at the screen instead of looking out the windshield, I imagine the same would apply flying with this gizmo.
 
I wonder how dense of fog it can see through? Lost a friend this year in a pass near anchorage, unknown reason but probably weather in the pass. I wonder if something like this wouldve made the difference.


Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org
 
Back
Top