Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 41 to 57 of 57

Thread: Should I buy a 2nd plane- " fast family hauler"

  1. #41
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK.
    Posts
    4,002
    Post Thanks / Like
    Before I'd fly the young I'd seek a physician's advice. Their ears are developing and that can make them sensitive to changes in air pressure, unusual movement, and sounds. No need to develop an avoidance at an early age to flying or riding in a road vehicle for that matter. Some of us may recall that experience from our youth.

    Gary

  2. #42
    stewartb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Wolf Lake, AK
    Posts
    7,739
    Post Thanks / Like
    My daughter grew up in airplanes, jet boats, and on snowmachines. I wouldn’t change a thing, and I’m pretty sure she’d agree. So many good memories. If you don’t share your adventures with your kids, who will?
    Thanks JeffP thanked for this post
    Likes WWhunter liked this post

  3. #43

    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    57
    Post Thanks / Like
    The Twin Comanche was mentioned, I’m interested in one but am concerned about maintenance and parts availability, any advice is appreciated. I’m multi and IFR rated,
    Steve

  4. #44
    skywagon8a's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    SE Mass
    Posts
    12,526
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by s kregel View Post
    The Twin Comanche was mentioned, I’m interested in one but am concerned about maintenance and parts availability, any advice is appreciated. I’m multi and IFR rated,
    Steve
    Love that airplane. The later ones had a different airfoil on the stabilizer which made them less touchy on landings. If you want speed, the single engine PA-24B and C models were faster.
    N1PA

  5. #45

    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    1,442
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by s kregel View Post
    The Twin Comanche was mentioned, Iím interested in one but am concerned about maintenance and parts availability, any advice is appreciated. Iím multi and IFR rated,
    Steve
    Parts are available, you just need to look. Like all old airplanes, they require some attention, particularly the gear system. There is a 1000 hour AD that can be costly. Iím up to almost $5k just in parts for that inspection. Takes about 30 hours to do the inspection. If you are looking to buy, best to find one that it was just done. The singles have more ADs than the twins. Just have someone that knows Comanches review the logs to be sure the heavy hitters are done! Insurance on twins can be prohibitive. Kind of like seaplanes. Iím planning on just liability for mine.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  6. #46

    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    57
    Post Thanks / Like
    Thanks for the response, I’m aware of the gear and stabilator AD’s , I have a full coverage Ins quote of 4900. Just nervous about parts availability in the future.
    Thanks flynlow thanked for this post

  7. #47

    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    25
    Post Thanks / Like
    If your wife is interested in flying, then definitely get something you can use to fly the whole family. We got a 4 place Bearhawk when our kid was born and haven't regretted it. Theoretically it doesn't get in and out as short as the Cubs, but it gets into almost all the fun places in the north east. And it can hauling the family and our camping gear, bikes, or skis. We just took it to Alaska and back for an epic adventure. It wouldn't have been the same for just one person to fly and leave the family behind.

    As for headsets and little kids, our baby was less than a month old on his first flight. We bought ear muffs targeted at rock concerts. We never had an issue with him pulling them off or them falling off. Usually he just fell asleep as soon as the motor started. Now he complains if he has to sit in back. He wants to be up front flying.

    Emilie

    P.S. Give your wife the Cub as a hand me down and everyone will be happy.
    Emilie

    Airplanes: Blue RV-4, Bearhawk 4-place
    Read about my flying adventures

  8. #48

    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Knoxville, Tn.
    Posts
    296
    Post Thanks / Like
    Get a Cirrus SR20. Do their free transition training. An older used SR20 (2003 - 2005) is highly safe, fast, capable and economical. The SR22 is more than you need right now. Flying a Cirrus is also a great way to make sure that the few truly judgmental jerks in the aviation world will avoid you.

    The Cub and the Cirrus have different uses. I have both (and a Maule). I fly the SR20 for moderate distances (3-6 hour trips) and the Cub just like you do because it's the funnest plane in the world. The Maule is going to be more and more for backcountry camping as I retire, but that's a whole different story.

    There are no better stores of financial value than carefully chosen planes and carefully chosen real estate right now, given the devaluation of other paper investments through inflation.

    The wise old men on the forum are correct. At your experience level (no IFR), you are probably not a strong pilot yet. But if you don't actually go flying like THEY did at the beginning, you will never improve. You will find that putting your wife and kids in the plane with you is the best incentive ever to become the best pilot that you can be.
    Likes Cardiff Kook liked this post

  9. #49

    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    206
    Post Thanks / Like
    Twin Comanches, I had 2 of them and put about 2500 hrs on them. One A model and one B counter rotator. The last one was 170kt which was fast for them. They are faster than the singles by quite a bit. They are maintanence hogs if they were not continually cared for. Get tip tanks. Good ones a great and will fly off on one engine if not real heavy. Won’t carry much ice.

    Jim
    Likes dgapilot liked this post

  10. #50
    Waldo M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Finger Lakes area, western NY.
    Posts
    143
    Post Thanks / Like
    I can't believe no one has mentioned this very old saying before, but here it is.

    If it flies, floats, or, ...er...ah.... giggles in bed, it is cheaper to rent.

    That's the first alternative. The second one is a partnership. In that case, like a marriage partner, choose wisely.

    I am a long time PA-11 owner that will also be in need of a transportation airplane eventually. A Cessna 185 or 195 would be my ideal, but I can't justify the expense when a Cessna 182 in equivalent condition and age is cheaper. I prefer tailwheel airplanes as well, but I don't prefer them tens of thousands of dollars worth. I'm not sure the value is there in any of those airframes when I would only be operating the airplane 100 hours a year or less. A partnership with one or two partners makes ownership in a second airplane much more viable. A tricycle gear airplane opens up more partner prospects and helps reduce the cost of hull insurance. A fixed gear airplane helps in this regard as well as lowering maintenance costs.
    Likes cubdriver2 liked this post

  11. #51

    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Rangely, Co
    Posts
    100
    Post Thanks / Like
    My wife was pregnant with our first when I learned to fly. Doc didn’t quite know how to respond when we asked all the ‘noise’ questions, but did a little homework. I don’t remember when our ears develop, but babies do hear inside mom! Our Doc suggested some type of covering while flying, which worked out to be a thick coat as it was cold. Once our kids were born, we used the silicone plugs that some infants wear while swimming to keep water out of their ears. That worked like ‘muffs’ and never came out inadvertently. It really didn’t matter much, though, because as has been mentioned the kids all went to sleep quickly. We took our kids with us and never had any major issues. We also did some competitive shooting and the same applied for hearing protection whilst shooting. Good luck with your decision.
    Thanks Cardiff Kook thanked for this post

  12. #52
    flynlow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Fowler, Ks
    Posts
    696
    Post Thanks / Like
    Build some hours, save some money. Get the instrument ticket, not so much for launching into the clouds but the training and the Ďwhat ifsí




    Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org
    Likes skywagon8a liked this post

  13. #53
    Eferr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    ID
    Posts
    94
    Post Thanks / Like
    Great dilemma. Iím in a similar boat. PA-18 and a maule m5, which has been my family hauler around idaho, and I like it a lot. The barn door is great and it flies fast than the cub. Problem is a friend let my wife sit in a bonanza, and now she likes it way more (some friend). I suppose itís more suitable in the sticks than a Mooney. Iím not a good enough pilot to take the whole fam to challenging soft strips anyway. For me, cub is the local play machine, maule (like Steve) for >100 miles, and the thought of a 160+kt for that 500 mi radius would be sweet. Maybe a club is the way to goÖ


    Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org

  14. #54
    SJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Northwest Arkansas
    Posts
    15,944
    Post Thanks / Like
    Right after I got my private certificate, I joined a flying club with a 172 and Cherokee 180. It was an equity club, meaning you had to "buy in" to the two airplanes. Cheapest flying I have ever done in my life (did almost all my other ratings except multi / MEI in the club planes - which later included an Arrow). It also exposed me early on to the world of maintaining airplanes and had a great group of mentors.

    As others have said, a good partnership or club is a great way to share costs. I have been in both. People always say airplane partnerships are bad, but if you carefully define the understandings of the partnership in advance (plenty of examples out there), it can be really great.

    sj
    "Often Mistaken, but Never in Doubt"
    ------------------------------------------
    Thanks Poor Joe thanked for this post
    Likes jrussl liked this post

  15. #55
    S2D's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    4,289
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by flagold View Post

    To the point, I've had a re-think - I'm not sure I'd be flying any infant and toddler just yet. They're still developing and the noise would be excruciating. I don't see how to keep them protected.

    I have engines running in my brain 24/7 - I'd sure hate for that to happen to them.

    I'm probably in the minority here. Good luck.

    /\ /\ /\ /\ /\ /\ /\ /\ /\ /\ /\ /\ /\ /\ /\ /\ /\ /\ /\ /\



    This in a nutshell.
    First time you take them down from altitude or have to get home on a hot day, you'll lose a young pilot.
    Start out with short early morning flights when they are old enough to enjoy it. then see how they develop
    You might have one that really can't handle much traveling in anything.
    Then maybe when they (and You) are ready for traveling pick the airplane you can be proficient in and go for it.

    Edit.
    That does not preclude you from getting one now, and really getting proficient in it for when the time comes that you can do family outings.
    But we all know what will happen if you have it.
    Last edited by S2D; 09-08-2022 at 10:33 AM.

  16. #56

    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    East Texas
    Posts
    108
    Post Thanks / Like
    OP - we all start at like you, dream big! Very few people actually fly enough recreationally to "justify" maintaining two airplanes. If you can do it and accept that both of them are toys and that you are throwing away $50k or whatever a year then go for it.

    Agree with the other comments, expecting the family to be ready to pick up and roll with limited time in your desired platform without being IFR probably isn't the best idea.
    Likes Cardiff Kook liked this post

  17. #57

    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    1,442
    Post Thanks / Like
    When I was going through a divorce, my youngest was only 2 or 3. She had been flying since she was a month old, so not new to flying. At the time I was working weekends towing gliders. The weekends I had the her, I would strap her in the back of the SuperCub and she would ride back there all day. Some days well over 30 tows. Never bothered her, most days she would nap back there a good part of the day.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Thanks Poor Joe thanked for this post
    Likes stewartb, Cardiff Kook liked this post

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 18
    Last Post: 01-24-2021, 11:19 AM
  2. Replies: 9
    Last Post: 12-18-2015, 12:48 PM
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-13-2014, 06:06 PM
  4. A real "Bush" plane?
    By rcsimpson in forum Cafe Supercub
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-01-2006, 08:12 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •