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Thread: Sad Day or Happy Day? Thoughts on Contemplating Retirement

  1. #41
    Cub Builder's Avatar
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    I pulled the plug on work and retired just over 4 years ago. I liked what I was doing and had a customer base that really liked my work, but I could just as easily live without it. I figure my true desire to be playing with airplanes has an expiration date, so decided it was time to do what I wanted while I could. But in retirement, I find that without the stresses and time sync of my career, I have more time for me, more time for the wife, more time for the (adult) kids, and more time to volunteer to do the things I want. I had set up my retirement plans and had already moved to another part of the country, so the day I turned in my credentials, the wife and I got in the truck and drove half way across the country to our new home. Health became my first focus, so I got a failing knee replaced and lost 120#. Now I feel like doing the things I didn't have the drive to do 4 years ago when I retired.

    Life was good while I was working. Life is great in my retirement. I highly recommend it if you have a plan for your time. Those that treat retirement as an opportunity to sit in front of the TV until they die don't find it very fulfilling.

    -Cub Builder

  2. #42

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    A few years ago, while driving to work, I was listening to a radio station trivia question. “What is something that we needA A few years ago, while driving to work, I was listening to a radio station trivia question. “What is something that we need some of to live?” “Too little will kill you and too much will kill you.” The correct answer was “stress.”

    That work week my copilot was a retired Continental Airline pilot. I asked him why he was still working. He said, “Retirement is not all it is cracked up to be.” He related that you can fish and golf only so much, and his bored retired friends drive him crazy.


    He then related that when he retired from Continental, he tried to get some life insurance and the quote came back astronomically high. His broker did some digging, and found out that it was due to the fact that on average retired Continental pilots receive 18 months of retirement checks and then they die. A fact that he confirmed with his HR department. He wasn’t quite ready for that.



    As others have mentioned, better have a plan. If you have a high stress level job, or stress over your job, don’t flip the switch to off. You will need a reason or purpose to get up every day. I know others that their Dr’s have advised of the same.

    few years ago, while driving to work, I was listening to a radio station trivia question. “What is something that we need some of to live?” “Too little will kill you and too much will kill you.” The correct
    over your job, don’t flip the switch to off. You will need a reason or purpose to get up every day.
    Last edited by MoJo; 03-11-2022 at 10:53 AM.
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  3. #43
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
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    We need to hear from the female side to complete this retirement equation. My experience is limited to my wife who simply transitioned from driving to and from work to not. The rest of her day is spent as usual with even more activity that she finds rewarding. I may be quite wrong but unlike most men that require physical ability to stay busy, they tend to do similar activities within their abilities from youth into older age. (?)

    Their retirement transition appears......well, more smooth for lack of a better term. I've been told her secret to retirement has been maintaining and increasing a broad social network. Like the same or more interaction with friends and family. Not having a social network and interests outside of employment might leave one feeling alone and in deteriorating mental and physical health?

    A thought: "Think about the going out before the coming in" Plan early and often for retirement.

    Gary
    Last edited by BC12D-4-85; 03-11-2022 at 01:07 PM.
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  4. #44

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    Randy, It looks like you have lots of options in retirement to keep your life meaningful. I retired two years ago at 72 after living my dream. I was lucky enough to fly for pay. I would still be doing it, but I think somebody got a peak at my drivers license and found out how old I am. I still fly my 7ac and J-3,but now om my dime. I am still trying to finish my PA-12 project, so if you get really bored stop in at the Mahnomen airport. To keep my wife happy I have had to give up sky flying and move to Mesa, Az for the winters where she can walk every day without worrying about slipping on the ice. I have found being a volunteer at the Commemorative Air Force working on the B-17 keeps me out of trouble and satisfies the aviation need. All the best to you in whatever you decide to do.
    Mike Syverson

  5. #45
    WindOnHisNose's Avatar
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    One of the great benefits of sticking my neck out and starting a thread like this is the excellent input I receive. Thanks, again, for the responses.

    I have two books on order, each of which were highly recommended by several of you, dealing with retirement.

    From Strength to Strength: Finding Success, Happiness, and Deep Purpose in the Second Half of Life, by Arthur Brooks

    Designing Your Life: How to Build a Well-Lived, Joyful Life, by Burnett, Bill

    Thanks, again,

    Randy
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  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by WindOnHisNose View Post
    One of the great benefits of sticking my neck out and starting a thread like this is the excellent input I receive. Thanks, again, for the responses.

    I have two books on order, each of which were highly recommended by several of you, dealing with retirement.

    From Strength to Strength: Finding Success, Happiness, and Deep Purpose in the Second Half of Life, by Arthur Brooks

    Designing Your Life: How to Build a Well-Lived, Joyful Life, by Burnett, Bill

    Thanks, again,

    Randy
    Should have followed Eaton's lead, just keep renewing Playboy

    Glenn
    "Optimism is going after Moby Dick in a rowboat and taking the tartar sauce with you!"
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  7. #47

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    What's depressing is your poor wife having to deal with you 24/7 once you retire..............of course, I'm sure you ever did really work for a living anyway


    Quote Originally Posted by SteveE View Post
    This is the most depressing thread I’ve ever read.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  8. #48
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    Back when I was union carpentering, the union business office had a poster up on the wall: two old broken down cowboys leaning on a barb wire fence, and one says to the other "if I'd known I was going to live so long, I'd have taken better care of myself." In my early 20's, I thought it was hilarious, now I know it as true words of wisdom. When I quit the union to go into business for myself, I remember the union rep telling me that if I only worked another 2 or 3 years (something like that) I'd be vested in the pension program and could be receiving monthly payments when I hit 65. I laughed in his face, that was old man thinking to me, I guess I thought I'd stay 23 forever, or something.
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  9. #49
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    Randy,

    If you’re really fortunate….and I’m sure you are, there will be some sadness and some joy when you retire.

    The sadness will be that you really loved what you did for so many years, and you’ll always miss that just a bit. But, that’s a good thing, it simply means you spent your working years doing something you loved.

    But, looking forward, there are many options, and choosing which to pursue will be the challenge. But, just as you have done for years in your career, you’ll go all in on whatever path you choose to go down. So, plan on taking some time, go visit those grandkids and spoil them while you settle on specifics.

    Its a big world, and it’s just waiting for you, Randy!

    Edit: I just noted a set of EDO 2000s for sale in Iowa…..hint.

    MTV
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  10. #50

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    I've never met anyone who said on their deathbed "I should have worked more."

    My plan was to retire when I was 48, I didn't make it, I retired when I was 49 after a wonderful career with state parks. This didn't happen by accident, I worked hard, saved a lot and invested well. In the 16+ years since then I have only been bored 1 day, I took a nap and that fixed that.

    What nobody talks about is the fact I am physically unable to do today what I could do at 50, and I hate it. And it's due to physical attrition, not injury, sickness or anything else. I'm just bloody glad I retired when I did so I could do what I did when I could do it.

    I think most people work too long, get burned out, bitter and cynical. Go early, while you're still young at whatever age that may be.
    Staying alive in an airplane has a lot more to do with mastering ourselves than mastering the aircraft.
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  11. #51
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    I loved my job in the IT industry, and felt like I never worked a day in my life. My wife called me a workaholic, but I just enjoyed it so much that time flew by every day. The plan was to retire at age 65...

    Then two things happened within a couple of months that changed my outlook dramatically. First of all, following a corporate merger, there was a new VP appointed over my department. He was absolutely unqualified for the job (totally incompetent in our field) and his ignorance created a living hell for everyone in the department. Between trying to keep him from destroying our department and undoing years of efforts, and trying to educate someone who thought he was smarter than everyone around him and thus wouldn't really listen, my job wasn't a whole lot of fun any longer... For the first time in years, I almost dreaded going to work every day for fear of what crap he would deliver to us that day...

    Then my wife and I went on vacation – an Alaskan cruise - the first "real" vacation we had taken in years that didn't involve visiting family. We thoroughly enjoyed the time together, and I realized that her health issues (which she had downplayed for years) were more significant than I had thought. We had lots of things we wanted to do when we retired, and I realized that at 65, some of them might no longer be possible for her. I began to consider the tradeoffs between financial security and quality of life, and made the decision that I needed to move up the retirement date so we could actually enjoy our retirement.

    I spent a couple of months after we got back from the cruise planning for a revised financial picture, based on retiring significantly earlier than originally planned, and found that it was do-able without minor sacrifices. We might not be vacationing on the Riviera, but we would have a great life together.

    At my wife's urging, I waited a full year to finalize the decision. During that time, we paid off the mortgage on our home and became 100% debt free, which had been a long-time goal. Once the year was up, I still wanted to pull the plug, and so we did.

    I retired from a job I had loved, and where I worked 70-90 hours a week, and never once looked back or regretted it. I was offered a few "consulting" gigs (including for the company I had retired from), but turned them all down without regret. I miss some of the people (most of whom retired around the same time I did), but not the stress or the constant deadlines.

    Now my wife and I own a small motorhome (Class C) and take lots of short camping trips, with an occasional "big one" thrown in. When COVID isolation hit, we weathered it amazingly well, and our relationship is better than ever. After 44 years of marriage, we're still in love with each other, and still would rather spend time together than with anyone else – with the possible exception of our kids and grandkids. I'm thoroughly enjoying spending time with them, doing Young Eagle flights for EAA, and just having a great time.

    I wouldn't change a thing!
    Jim Parker
    2007 Rans S-6ES
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  12. #52
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    My "work" today involved a 50 mile flight to the Bear Lake Utah shore area, where I eyeballed a crane job site after I kept getting squirrely answers from the guy who called me. I thought he was onsite, turned out he was sitting in an office 100 miles away, that's why he couldn't give me a straight answer about the mud, or lack of it, conditions. So, I jumped in the plane and ascertained it myself, sending him an aerial pic and ironing out the details, all while flying overhead. Then a little ice skating AND water skiing on the semi frozen lake, and other fooling around on the way home, 2.5 hrs in all. It almost (not quite, but almost) seems like more fun flying when I can say it was work related. The funny thing is, the plane actually does come in handy for my work, today only one of many examples. Plus I know how to get there know via the roads. Then I went snowboarding, then for a e bike ride. If that's work, I'll keep doing it a while longer, sure seemed like fun.

  13. #53
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    Fantastic thread! I sure learn a lot reading these types of threads. I’m 59 and have 6 years to go before my retirement and it is great to read and learn from the responses on these threads. Thanks to Randy for starting this thread. I really dont have any good advice for Randy but I do want to wish him all the best and thank him for what he has done for all of us in this aviation community and others in the medical field. Also, thank you to all of you who have posted.

    Kurt
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  14. #54

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    Retired for decades now - from a great airline job. The secret - always have at least one operable Cub. Plan on an average five landings a day, seven days a week. Fly upside down once a week, but stop when your stomach hollers "uncle." Read challenging stuff. Keep up with the latest conspiracy theories, and occasionally read a book written by someone you wildly disagree with. Have a good hobby - mine is building model steam locomotives, but today it is fixing a couple leaking valves on a C-85.

    Above all, think of how lucky you are to live this long with nobody firing missiles at your apartment building. And when your spouse starts hollering at you, smile inwardly, do not answer, and maintain a seriously concerned face.

    The only real downside is that stupid light at the end of the tunnel - it indeed is a freight train, and it is moving really fast.

  15. #55
    WindOnHisNose's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob turner View Post
    ... And when your spouse starts hollering at you, smile inwardly, do not answer, and maintain a seriously concerned face.
    Bob, thanks for the post, particularly the smile inward sage advice.

    ...maintaining a seriously concerned face, currently.



    Randy
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