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Thread: Almost Killed Myself With Corned Beef PSA

  1. #1
    flagold's Avatar
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    Almost Killed Myself With Corned Beef PSA

    Here's how I did it, step by step (obviously you guys in AK and elsewhere doing your own are OK):

    1. Bought a frozen corned beef (packaged) - you can't see what's in the bag but hey, it's cheaper.
    2. Upon thawing out said frozen corned beef find there's a lot of blood in the plate it's on. So the bag is compromised, who knows for how long?
    3. Made a terrible decision: I'm not throwing out $20 worth of meat! What would Connie say?
    4. Cook it - she said it smelled different - but I had used more spices on it and a quick taste seemed like it was the spices - not the meat . . . bzzzzt!
    5. Ate a full plate of the stuff. Hadn't had it in awhile and was hungry for it.
    6. 30 minutes later got the first kick in the stomach and that didn't let up for 9 hours. Spent a lot of time holding on to the washing machine that is next to the bathroom because it's taller than the commode. Night sweats - chills - sweats. Anytime I tried to lay down I'd get those kicks in the stomach again and barfed - so stayed up all night guarding the washer. I now know what real food poisoning is instead of the quick trots and whatnot. I see how people die from it. Past 60 - getting kicked in the stomach all night is not good. Don't do it. Really sore where my liver is so I know it took a beating too.
    7. Stumbled out this morning and thew the corned beef away. Should have been #1.

    Just a general comment: I've seen some meats that look questionable and just wonder if in the current environment we're in (labor shortages) if some things aren't getting by the wouldn't otherwise. In any event, be careful. I could have thrown my life away on a silly corned beef.
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    SteveE's Avatar
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    All that started with you buying corned beef. Spam would make a better meal.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  3. #3
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    There was a time in my life that things were tight. I was harvest diving for sea cucumbers- a commercial fishery up here. After a couple weeks of hard work and selling multiple loads, the checks from the buyer all bounced...

    Sort of interesting that one of the most important shopping items in many Southeast Alaska villages is a spotlight. Then again, it is amazing how much food lives on the bottom of the ocean, and barter is a wonderful thing.

    Long answer to the above question is I would collect my own food if possible.
    I don't know where you've been me lad, but I see you won first Prize!
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    behindpropellers's Avatar
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    Sounds like quite the weight loss regimen.

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    RVBottomly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aktango58 View Post

    Long answer to the above question is I would collect my own food if possible.
    I hadn't really thought of it in those terms, but, come to think of it, I have probably a year's supply of protein all canned up or frozen. Trout, bass, beef, chicken. And I know exactly where it all came from.
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    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
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    Devil Spawn - that's what some of the well fed call corned beef and other party foods. I keep A,B, and C in #3 just in case the weather sours or transportation is limited. Used to get Argentine canned beef in SE Alaska but it's not around much today in Fairbanks.

    Hint: A gagging finger down the throat creates a reflux reaction (emetic) that gets rid of foul items in the stomach. Just have to be careful about respirating the contents into the lungs. Some of us have had food poisoning miles from civilization so reversal is critical. Animals like dogs can react to swallowed hydrogen peroxide

    Gary
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  7. #7

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    Hmmm. Wife smart enough not to eat it? Or she just has stainless steel inards?

  8. #8
    flybynite's Avatar
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    The Vienna sausage picture brought back memories of those church basement pot-luck buffets where someone would inevitably bring an aspic or Jello treat made with gelatin, Vienna sausage, hard boiled eggs and coleslaw.

    For those of you too young to remember or want to see what your parents may have eaten, https://lileks.com/institute/gallery/index.html


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  9. #9

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    Upper right quadrant pain isn’t funny. Livers don’t start hurting for minor assaults. If it were me I would see a doctor right away, especially if the pain persists or if you notice slight yellowing of skin, eyes, or underneath your tongue.
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  10. #10
    Dave Calkins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flagold View Post
    Here's how I did it, step by step (obviously you guys in AK and elsewhere doing your own are OK):

    1. Bought a frozen corned beef (packaged) - you can't see what's in the bag but hey, it's cheaper.
    2. Upon thawing out said frozen corned beef find there's a lot of blood in the plate it's on. So the bag is compromised, who knows for how long?
    3. Made a terrible decision: I'm not throwing out $20 worth of meat! What would Connie say?
    4. Cook it - she said it smelled different - but I had used more spices on it and a quick taste seemed like it was the spices - not the meat . . . bzzzzt!
    5. Ate a full plate of the stuff. Hadn't had it in awhile and was hungry for it.
    6. 30 minutes later got the first kick in the stomach and that didn't let up for 9 hours. Spent a lot of time holding on to the washing machine that is next to the bathroom because it's taller than the commode. Night sweats - chills - sweats. Anytime I tried to lay down I'd get those kicks in the stomach again and barfed - so stayed up all night guarding the washer. I now know what real food poisoning is instead of the quick trots and whatnot. I see how people die from it. Past 60 - getting kicked in the stomach all night is not good. Don't do it. Really sore where my liver is so I know it took a beating too.
    7. Stumbled out this morning and thew the corned beef away. Should have been #1.

    Just a general comment: I've seen some meats that look questionable and just wonder if in the current environment we're in (labor shortages) if some things aren't getting by the wouldn't otherwise. In any event, be careful. I could have thrown my life away on a silly corned beef.
    Flagold, I am not sure if you meant the initial post to be funny. My wife and I are laughing so hard at each statement you made, and glad my coffee is still in the cup. thanks!

  11. #11
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
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    We eat it a few (very few) times a year. Try to buy it precooked. There's enough of the Devil Spawn nitrites and salt embedded in the product to reduce bacterial growth, but some cuts have a low % of preservation to make it a caution. I like to rinse it in ice cold running water to leech out some of the Spawn's seeds before cooking.

    The trouble with frozen foods is there's no way of knowing if they've been thawed previously - like when a truck or storage unit had a power outage. And any salt can lower the safe freezing point. Not the best thing to deal with especially in a slow cooker that may not get hot enough to quickly kill the bugs.

    Try this for an all day cook and feast: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hzsnUN8aI3k I got the small Jr. version of that cooker.

    Gary

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    This doesn’t have much bearing on any of this I suppose other than being informative. Item “C”, the Vienna sausage, well, a little history in my past there. Running guided caribou hunts out of Dillingham back in the mid 2000s. Seems we had some cases of the sausages. They were cheap and filling, found their way into hunters lunches. Some ate em, some didn’t.
    One day a guy opened a can, sniffed them, read the side of the can, declares “No freakin way I’m eating these” Dumps them out on the tundra mound where we were glassing from. Typical Southwest AK fall weather is more moist that dry as some of you know. In the ensuing days when hiking past that spot or glassing from there, I’d see those sausages. Generally you all know about what they look like coming out of their little can. Let’s just say that in the rain they made this amazing transformation from that to getting about 1 1/4” in diameter and about 5-6” long. Haven’t eaten any since. Mystery meat.

    Oz

  13. #13
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
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    There's nothing like a cold day out then opening a can of mystery meat over a fire. Stick a twig in the sausages and crisp 'em over the flames. Everything including the oink.

    Gary
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  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by BC12D-4-85 View Post
    There's nothing like a cold day out then opening a can of mystery meat over a fire. Stick a twig in the sausages and crisp 'em over the flames. Everything including the oink.

    Gary
    Gary, you put a grin on my face a mile wide. Thanks! Cold day today indeed here in ol’ Fairbanks, wind whipping through the trees and all. Wind chill dropping as the suns doing the same. -55 tonite, stoke up the fire and spear a weenie!

    Oz
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    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
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    Well MOz after some thought I reckon what you saw on the ground that large was the digested remains of the earlier sausages. Sorta' left a thank you to mark the spot as territory like critters do. Looks the same...tastes different I suppose.

    Yea cold and windy but warmer next couple of weeks. February could be brutal but at least we get daylight. Meanwhile my Taylorcraft is hibernation at the float pond.

    Gary

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    Nope, those sausages came out of the can and hit the ground and were never touched again during the time we were there. Nothing ate them and redeposited their recycled remains as far as I could tell. They remained a sorta pale pink for days. All I can figure is the ingredient in them that qualifies as “filler” or “cereal” just absorbed the moisture available as rain, humidity, etc. and swelled up. In any case it was educational.

    Oz

  17. #17
    RVBottomly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OzAK View Post
    Nope, those sausages came out of the can and hit the ground and were never touched again during the time we were there. Nothing ate them and redeposited their recycled remains as far as I could tell. They remained a sorta pale pink for days. All I can figure is the ingredient in them that qualifies as “filler” or “cereal” just absorbed the moisture available as rain, humidity, etc. and swelled up. In any case it was educational.

    Oz
    Now I want to buy some for an experiment. Maybe use the principle for lifting houses off their foundations, etc.

    Fwiw, I like to make my own Spam. Can it in pint jars and keep some in the truck. Makes me think I’m ready for anything.


    Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org mobile app

  18. #18
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
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    Maybe I've boiled too many hot dogs...but some explode during and some don't much. Depends like Oz says on ingredients like fillers and salt content. Come to think of it a buddy gave me some moose hot dogs with pepper cheese filler so that's what the dog and I are having for dinner. Wife left us alone while on vacation so we can do what we want for a change.

    Gary

  19. #19
    flagold's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Heinrich View Post
    Upper right quadrant pain isn’t funny. Livers don’t start hurting for minor assaults. If it were me I would see a doctor right away, especially if the pain persists or if you notice slight yellowing of skin, eyes, or underneath your tongue.
    This is very good advice of course. Connie and I have both been in the medical field and checked for the signs of liver damage. Due to the stroke I'm checked often and have a blood test next week.

    As for the other quotes: didn't mean it to be funny but in re-reading that I can certainly see how it could be taken that way.
    "Devil Spawn" - corning is simply one of the oldest pickling techniques - any historical figure would know what was being served - really no need for it in todays world of refrigeration and from now on I don't need it either. Soldiers in the territories would get their meat ration out of the pickling barrel (beef/pork) and throw it against the fort wall, if it stuck they'd go get another and throw it against the wall - if it fell off they'd dust it off and cook it (wasn't spoiled).

    Spam - I really can't talk bad about Hormel Spam since it (sales of stock) paid for "902 CC" the first land certificated Top Cub made ("901" was 1st seaplane). Jim Richmond flew it out to me and was really shocked to learn Spam paid for it! (He had bought a number of airplanes from me, and what he didn't buy pzink on this forum did) Anyway, Asian Spam sales alone are enough to fund Hormel alone. It is a standard of their diets (all countries). You can do a pretty fair copy of what they go crazy for in your toaster oven on broil:

    Slice the can of spam into thin slices - lay this into your broiler pan - cover the slices with pineapple juice and sprinkle with brown sugar - add 2 cloves to each slice (skewer the slice with one on each end) - put it under the broiler and brown it - flip - make sure the other side has pineapple juice and sugar on it too and brown.

    Result: CANDIED SPAM

    They eat ton after ton after ton of Spam this way. Sales figures are astronomical.
    -----------------
    This stuff lasted a lot longer than I thought it would - as I said originally - be very cautious. For some of us, making our own meat is no longer possible (we do supply a few families with fish and trade for flounder & shrimp but that's about it).

  20. #20
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
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    There was a time in Alaska when fresh non-game meat and produce was either rare or simply unavailable. Residents ate fish-game-fowl-wild eggs-even furbearing carcasses. Canned food was the only alternative if shopping for some variety. And it kept well providing the container wasn't eventually compromised. In Sitka (and in pre-airport Alaska in general) mid-'60's all food arrived by container ship or barge well frozen for preservation. Including lettuce or vegetables. Freezing is not kind to most vegetables. So, we learned to subsist on what was available and that familiar taste tends to linger.

    Gary

  21. #21
    flagold's Avatar
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    "Flybynight: The Vienna sausage picture brought back memories of those church basement pot-luck buffets where someone would inevitably bring an aspic or Jello treat made with gelatin, Vienna sausage, hard boiled eggs and coleslaw.

    For those of you too young to remember or want to see what your parents may have eaten, https://lileks.com/institute/gallery/index.html"

    I really enjoyed that. There was a time in the 1960's when my father got hung up on Cheez Whiz . . . Everything got slathered with the stuff, he couldn't make a burger without it and your burger got it too. Before WWII he had invested in an ice plant and intended to deliver ice after WWII - of course that conflict brought mass refrigeration and his plans were dashed, but anything that came in a jar or can he thought was the greatest thing in the world.

    One thing he did that was good was with some kind of bright red pickled sausage out of a jar (he'd bring a couple home so must have got them from a gas station, etc.). That would go into a pressure cooker with potatoes and a quartered cabbage and stick of butter on top. Pressured it for 30 minutes. When the came out everything was bright red and very hot, but very flavored. The sausages were transformed into gigantic size.
    Last edited by flagold; 01-11-2022 at 06:55 PM.
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  22. #22
    flagold's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BC12D-4-85 View Post
    There was a time in Alaska when fresh non-game meat and produce was either rare or simply unavailable. Residents ate fish-game-fowl-wild eggs-even furbearing carcasses. Canned food was the only alternative if shopping for some variety. And it kept well providing the container wasn't eventually compromised. In Sitka (and in pre-airport Alaska in general) mid-'60's all food arrived by container ship or barge well frozen for preservation. Including lettuce or vegetables. Freezing is not kind to most vegetables. So, we learned to subsist on what was available and that familiar taste tends to linger.

    Gary
    I get it. We didn't have it quite that bad, but living on the edge of the Green Swamp, I got my share of questionable stuff. Talking with my mother some 30 years later I casually said how fun it was to go out with Dad at night shooting rabbits and was informed it "wasn't for fun." I had no idea.
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  23. #23
    TurboBeaver's Avatar
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    When it comes to corn beef in a can it's Libby's...... Only.

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    Been there done that, still can't look at or smell BBQ Beef Ribs let alone eat them but then again it's only been 33 years.
    Remember, These are the Good old Days!

  25. #25
    flagold's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TurboBeaver View Post
    When it comes to corn beef in a can it's Libby's...... Only.
    +1 You really can't go wrong with Libby's in the can or corned beef hash I agree. The only other one to consider is

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I still haven't eaten a cooked from scratch corned beef to this day and will not. Just can't bring myself to it. As for the devil spawn and all that though - it really is just the oldest meat preservation method, some 5000 years old. If Jesus or any of that period people were eating with us they'd know exactly what was being served. The Jewish (oldest) method (I'm going from memory) was make a brine out of salt & spices to cover the meat submerged, and put a stone weight (12 pound standard measure of the day) on top - flip every day for 9 days until it was cured. There really isn't any need for this method in todays world but enough like the taste it has remained. I've been cured (no pun intended) of it though.
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    flybynite's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flagold View Post
    One thing he did that was good was with some kind of bright red pickled sausage out of a jar (he'd bring a couple home so must have got them from a gas station, etc.). That would go into a pressure cooker with potatoes and a quartered cabbage and stick of butter on top. Pressured it for 30 minutes. When the came out everything was bright red and very hot, but very flavored. The sausages were transformed into gigantic size.

    Still a thing, at least in some places. My father in law would eat them out of the jar. Mystery meat for sure.

    https://www.pickledstore.com/categor...ckled-Sausage/



    The description of the Matt & Dana's: Ah... Remember the good ole days when they had the pickled sausage on the counter top at the local gas station or tavern? Chances are this is the one! This pickled hot sausage is made from both chicken and beef and seasoned perfectly.

  27. #27

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    A good friend and I flew his C-185 to Laurel MT to look at bulls in December. Great flight to MT, looked at bulls, ate supper went to hotel and spent the night. Had the continental breakfast, went to the airport and did the preflight. I mentioned that my breakfast sausage wasn’t sitting very good, fired up the 185, warmed her up and took off. About 7 minutes into the flight I again said the sausage wasn’t sitting very good do you have a baggy? He looked around and found a baggy, I gave him the controls and promptly filled the bag. We stopped in Buffalo WY and I left the rest of the sausages there. After about 45 minutes of looking at the airplanes in the hangar my friend suggested going to town and getting a room. I assured him I was fine and we went on home to NE, however I relinquished the left seat and was happy to be along for the ride for rest of the journey. I will steer clear of the sliced looking sausages from now on! Took a lot of fun out of my trip an amazing airplane!

  28. #28
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
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    Their Reindeer sausage is excellent: https://indianvalleymeats.com/gourmet-meat/

    Gary
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  29. #29
    flagold's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flybynite View Post
    Still a thing, at least in some places. My father in law would eat them out of the jar. Mystery meat for sure.

    https://www.pickledstore.com/categor...ckled-Sausage/



    The description of the Matt & Dana's: Ah... Remember the good ole days when they had the pickled sausage on the counter top at the local gas station or tavern? Chances are this is the one! This pickled hot sausage is made from both chicken and beef and seasoned perfectly.
    Just so you know, I'm going to see if I can duplicate his dish with that stuff. I'll report back at the proper time.
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  30. #30
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
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    Nothing like a hot grilled Reuben sandwich with a side of pickled hard boiled eggs. Add some canned beets and hot peppers to the pickling liquid for color and flavor. Best eaten after flight not before.

    Gary

  31. #31
    flagold's Avatar
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    OK - I did the sausage & cabbage deal we've talked about. I couldn't find Penrose and did some checking - the factory burned down for the big sausages like I remembered, though you can still find the little ones. This is what I could find readily that duplicated it (and definitely was in the gas stations here at that time):

    Click image for larger version. 

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    OK - that's done, the recipe and putting it together in a pressure cooker (we use an Instant Pot which cooks with 10 pounds) minimum water to operate in ours is 2 Cups:

    1 cabbage cut into quarters
    Put as many peeled potatoes on top of that to cover
    6 sausages on top of the potatoes - you could put 4 - but don't put any less
    4 crushed chicken bouillon cubes sprinkled on top of the sausages (the little ones - not those huge Knorr cubes)
    He put 2 sticks of butter on top - but he also had a massive stroke and died at 64 - so I cut that to 1/4 stick cut into pieces and covered the sausage
    1/4 t pepper 1/2 t salt.
    35 minutes and let the pressure release naturally

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The above doesn't show where I put the butter - slathered that on top of the sausages, they transferred the red color to everything else.

    Definitely turned the potatoes and cabbage the red color (and some was bright red) I remember as a kid. Connie said it had great flavor and I agree with that. We also agreed the sausage was disappointing, but that may simply be because it transferred all it's flavor to the cabbage/potatoes. Might be why I was told to eat the cabbage & potatoes as a kid and wasn't allowed the sausage (and they could have been Penrose Red Hots).

    If we had used 2 full sticks of butter, that would have really made a rich sauce - but my health just isn't up for it.
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  32. #32
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
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    If there's enough liquid floating oil in the dish the excess oil can be removed via absorbent pads. The kind used to clean up oil spills. Just cut off a piece and briefly dip and swirl it into the cooker. Works.

    Gary

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