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Thread: Another brake question

  1. #41
    Steve's Aircraft (Brian)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Airguide View Post
    I recently installed the Dakota red top master cylinders and linkage, we bled the system as directed and have a pretty solid pedal when brakes are applied. The problem I am having is the amount of travel the brake pedal travels before the brakes reach a firm pedal, we adjusted the Dakota linkage as directed. I flew the North River system for 40 years and got used to having little or no travel in the brake pedals when brakes were applied. Do vented systems like Steve's and Dakotas require extra pedal travel or can they be adjusted. I noticed a set screw on the master cylinder that could be used to move the master cylinder arm forward, or can the linkage be shortened to move the master cylinder arm forward without effecting the braking action? I have the linkage adjusted to allow the master cylinder arm approximately 1/16" inch of play, I even put new pads on to try to shorten the travel!
    The workmanship and customer service are great from the Dakota office in South Dakota, no complaints there.
    I am not familiar with how Dakota vents their master cylinders. However, if they are anything like mine they would use a small amount of pedal travel to close off the vent before making pressure. My brakes need about 1/8 inch movement at the shaft. Which is about 3/16 inch or so at the pedal end. That travel is the movement needed to close off the static seal to the back of the piston at which point the piston will start to move and create pressure to the calipers.

    Brian.
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  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve's Aircraft (Brian) View Post
    I am not familiar with how Dakota vents their master cylinders. However, if they are anything like mine they would use a small amount of pedal travel to close off the vent before making pressure. My brakes need about 1/8 inch movement at the shaft. Which is about 3/16 inch or so at the pedal end. That travel is the movement needed to close off the static seal to the back of the piston at which point the piston will start to move and create pressure to the calipers.

    Brian.
    Thanks again Brian!


    Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org mobile app

  3. #43

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    What is the best method to remedy soft brakes with the original Scott brakes on a 1973 Supercub?

  4. #44
    Gordon Misch's Avatar
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    Make sure theyre well bled, and pump em up from below. I used an oil can with a piece of tygon tube to the bleeder fitting to get a bit of preload.
    Gordon

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  5. #45
    skywagon8a's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Supercubrancher View Post
    What is the best method to remedy soft brakes with the original Scott brakes on a 1973 Supercub?
    After you have tried Gordon's method, if you still want a harder pedal do as I stated in post #33. The parking brake trick.
    N1PA
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  6. #46
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Supercubrancher View Post
    What is the best method to remedy soft brakes with the original Scott brakes on a 1973 Supercub?
    If they just got soft over time try adding fluid, put the top back on and pump a few times and repeat. It is a normal thing with the original Scott master cylinders. Make sure the gasket under the plug is a black fiber like substance, I have seen cooper gaskets and all kinds of other things over the years that did not work correctly. Univair has them. You might also determine when the master cylinder diaphragms were changed. They get old and bust. Then look at the parking brake valves for leaks in the end of the stem and the calipers for leaks around the pistons and you should be good.
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers
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