Results 1 to 39 of 39

Thread: Advice for a New A&P

  1. #1
    Henny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Ely, MN
    Posts
    360
    Post Thanks / Like

    Advice for a New A&P

    After a six-month delay due to COVID, I finally finished up school, passed the final two written exams and successfully completed the oral and practical exam to get my A&P license.

    Knowing full well that it is just another license to learn, I’m looking for advice from all you salty A&P’s out there on whatever you think is worth passing along (tips, tools, techniques, etc.)

    For reference, I will be helping work on the Beavers at work (radials, not turbines; straight Edo’s, no amphibs; de Havilland wheel skis), learning the annual process on my 185 while my IA performs the inspection, potentially doing some work on a Top Cub at work, and hopefully building an experimental or rebuilding a certified Super Cub at some point. No plans to do any work for hire except maybe for a brother or two (which could be a train wreck in itself I guess...).


    Thanks in advance for your words of wisdom.


    Henny
    Last edited by Henny; 12-01-2020 at 01:24 AM.

  2. #2
    Gordon Misch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Toledo, Wa (KTDO)
    Posts
    3,762
    Post Thanks / Like
    No advice from here, but hearty congratulations!
    Gordon

    N4328M KTDO
    My SPOT: tinyurl.com/N4328M (case sensitive)
    Likes Henny liked this post

  3. #3
    wireweinie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    3,623
    Post Thanks / Like
    Know FAR part 43 inside and out. Also get a copy of CAR3 and CAR4 and understand that aircraft certified under these regs are, by law, maintained in accordance with these and NOT part 23. As for the wrench turning, ask questions of the most experienced guys available on any system you might need help with.

    Web
    Life's tough . . . wear a cup.

  4. #4
    Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    At Work.....
    Posts
    1,836
    Post Thanks / Like
    Henny, Congrats!


    • Like Web said - Just ask a lot of questions.
    • Dont believe everything another mechanic says. Learn to look it up for yourself. (Yes, CAR3, CAR03, CAR4, FARs, & AC43 will be invaluable)
    • Regardless of what some say the FAA is not out to get you. There are asshats everywhere but for every one of those there are a half dozen good ones.
    • Figure out who they are and avoid the asshats and lean on the good ones for advice and assistance.
    • A really good one will lead you to, or point you in, the direction of the information you need but not give it to you. That goes for other mechanics and the FAA.
    • If you start to look it up and learn it for yourself then you become familiar with the regs and the reason for them and will become much more confident in your decisions.
    • Mistakes are part of this. Dont be afraid to make them and learn from them. But, learn to quit while you're ahead. Don't work youself into a mistake.
    • Sometimes there is not an easier way. Sometimes you have to just bust your knuckles to get the job done.
    • No one knows it all.... If you find that guy, avoid him.
    • Keep a book and take good notes for any procedure you will do more than once (Gasket/seal/oring/bolt lengths/torques/vendors/experts/etc.)


    Reach out to anyone here for advice or questions.

    Congrats Again! - GOOD ON YA!
    Likes mam90, Bill Rusk, Henny, StuBob, Hardtailjohn and 2 others liked this post

  5. #5
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Sandpoint, Idaho
    Posts
    5,381
    Post Thanks / Like
    Congrats Henny!!

    Bill
    Very Blessed.
    Likes Henny liked this post

  6. #6
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Graham, TX
    Posts
    20,366
    Post Thanks / Like
    Congrats. Ask a lot of questions and read and research on your own as well. I just bought a 182 and even though I maintained a later model back in the day I have found a treasure trove of information on everything from inspections, modifications and operations. We are in an information era for sure. Have an open mind, don't let anyone bully you into doing something you are uncomfortable with and be careful on those tool trucks. Lots of nice expensive stuff on there. Back in the day pawn shops were a great source for my tools but eBay is a good one now and shopping around for those specialty aviation tools. Number one thing, have fun and never stop learning. It has been a helluva ride for me.
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers

  7. #7
    jrussl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    589
    Post Thanks / Like
    Congrats, Henny!

    Feel free to wander over to my hangar. Could use some help getting a pile of engine parts making noise again.


    Sent from my iPad using SuperCub.Org
    Likes Henny liked this post

  8. #8

    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    799
    Post Thanks / Like
    Good on you Henry. Now the learning begins.keep in mind, there are good wrench benders that can’t do paperwork, there are guys that do paperwork well but have trouble with the hands on. Your goal should be to excel at both the hands on and the paperwork side!


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    7,327
    Post Thanks / Like
    One piece of advice - when working on your own, be aware of liability problems. A pilot can buy liability insurance (and defense lawyers) for under $300/year. A mechanic would need over $5000 for the same coverage. That should tell you something about the relative risk.
    Likes RaisedByWolves, Henny liked this post

  10. #10
    WindOnHisNose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Lino Lakes MN (MY18)
    Posts
    4,420
    Post Thanks / Like
    Way to go, Henny! Happy to hear that you checked that box. Wow, that time went fast! Congratulations!

    Randy
    Likes mike mcs repair, Henny liked this post

  11. #11
    8GCBC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Oahu
    Posts
    1,836
    Post Thanks / Like
    Get a Borescope and log cylinder trends graphically:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	01BFDF0D-23EB-48CB-9719-31358F8C4395.jpeg 
Views:	262 
Size:	115.5 KB 
ID:	52720
    2018 R44
    IA/A&P, ATP, SES, CFII, MEI, Rotor PPL (2500 TT)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SXI48e1heuo
    Likes RVBottomly, silflexer, Henny liked this post

  12. #12
    www.SkupTech.com mike mcs repair's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    chugiak AK
    Posts
    11,733
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by 8GCBC View Post
    Get a Borescope:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	01BFDF0D-23EB-48CB-9719-31358F8C4395.jpeg 
Views:	262 
Size:	115.5 KB 
ID:	52720
    on my wish list still.... although I have a see snake, which is kinda like that...

  13. #13
    RaisedByWolves's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    4,275
    Post Thanks / Like
    Now you get to see how many friend you have. They will come out of the woodwork.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  14. #14
    www.SkupTech.com mike mcs repair's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    chugiak AK
    Posts
    11,733
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by bob turner View Post
    One piece of advice - when working on your own, be aware of liability problems. A pilot can buy liability insurance (and defense lawyers) for under $300/year. A mechanic would need over $5000 for the same coverage. That should tell you something about the relative risk.
    never have had insurance.. posted notice on the door... if you think you want that, then go someplace else...

  15. #15

    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    799
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by mike mcs repair View Post
    never have had insurance.. posted notice on the door... if you think you want that, then go someplace else...
    Agree, been doing this for 50 years, never had insurance (never had enough assets most of my life to worry about it). Insurance is just an invitation for someone to hope for a big payout! Without insurance, most lawyers will figure they could never collect a contingency fee, so it’s not worth their bother.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Thanks PA-22/20-160, JeffP thanked for this post

  16. #16

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    7,327
    Post Thanks / Like
    I went bare until I was in my mid-30s, then a very bright friend pointed out that I had a social duty if I injured someone or damaged someone else's property. Remember, we have not totally socialized health care, and we are responsible for our actions.

    But you are correct - if you have no assets and somebody sues you, you just ignore them. They get a default judgment, and if there is nothing for the sheriff to attach, you don't have to worry.
    Likes Henny liked this post

  17. #17
    hotrod180's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Port Townsend, WA
    Posts
    3,332
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by bob turner View Post
    One piece of advice - when working on your own, be aware of liability problems. A pilot can buy liability insurance (and defense lawyers) for under $300/year. A mechanic would need over $5000 for the same coverage. That should tell you something about the relative risk.
    A guy I know got his A&P, then his IA, several years ago.
    He worked at an airplane shop.
    He was always worried about his liability.
    Perhaps because of this, he always wanted everything "perfect" (which is usually very expensive),
    instead of just airworthy (which usually costs much less).
    Surprisingly, he did most of that shop's annual inspections,
    I don't know if he signed them off himself or got the boss to.
    One of the last jobs he did there was an engine overhaul--
    the night before the owner came up pick up the airplane,
    he told his boss that he didn't want to accept the responsibility of signing it off.
    So the boss had to do it- although he hadn't done any of the work.
    He quit very shortly after that--
    probably saved his boss the trouble of letting him go.

    I guess my point is that if you are gonna have extreme liability concerns,
    don't put yourself in the position of having to sign things off.
    Cessna Skywagon-- accept no substitute!
    Likes ak49flyer, Hardtailjohn, Henny liked this post

  18. #18
    wireweinie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    3,623
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by bob turner View Post
    . . . and if there is nothing for the sheriff to attach, you don't have to worry.
    We don't have sheriffs in Alaska.

    Web
    Life's tough . . . wear a cup.

  19. #19

    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Utah/Alaska
    Posts
    208
    Post Thanks / Like
    Stay out of the Snap-on truck unless you absolutely have to...

  20. #20
    Hardtailjohn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Marion, MT
    Posts
    832
    Post Thanks / Like
    Congrats Henny!!! I used to know a guy that worked on Beavers up there...Jim Harry. Last I talked to him, he was headed to LA to work for PHI. That's some pretty country up there!
    Lots of good advice on here!
    John
    Likes 3phase, Henny liked this post

  21. #21
    cubdriver2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    upstate NY
    Posts
    10,392
    Post Thanks / Like
    Recognize whats unairworthy and what can be fixed as time and money allow

    Glenn
    "Optimism is going after Moby Dick in a rowboat and taking the tartar sauce with you!"

  22. #22
    behindpropellers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    6,867
    Post Thanks / Like
    Draw your line in the sand now.

    Only work for people who want quality.
    Only work for people who will pay you what you are worth.


    Say no.

    Say no. Say no.

    My example on this:

    Did your previous mechanic complete this service bulletin? Oh yes.

    Look at plane (wrapped in vinyl) - screws were covered in vinyl on the area required to be removed for the SB.

    And the list continued.

    My take on it.....there is an epidemic brewing of poorly maintained airplanes. Owners don't know what is right or they do not want to pay to have work done correctly. Mechanics are sloppy or they just do not know.

    Tim

  23. #23
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Graham, TX
    Posts
    20,366
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by behindpropellers View Post
    Draw your line in the sand now.

    Only work for people who want quality.
    Only work for people who will pay you what you are worth.


    Say no.

    Say no. Say no.

    My example on this:

    Did your previous mechanic complete this service bulletin? Oh yes.

    Look at plane (wrapped in vinyl) - screws were covered in vinyl on the area required to be removed for the SB.

    And the list continued.

    My take on it.....there is an epidemic brewing of poorly maintained airplanes. Owners don't know what is right or they do not want to pay to have work done correctly. Mechanics are sloppy or they just do not know.

    Tim
    You are gonna work yourself into a new career.
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers
    Likes mike mcs repair, DENNY, Henny liked this post

  24. #24
    wireweinie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    3,623
    Post Thanks / Like
    Ha!

    Web
    Life's tough . . . wear a cup.

  25. #25
    Henny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Ely, MN
    Posts
    360
    Post Thanks / Like
    Truly appreciate all of the kind words and sage advice.

    Quote Originally Posted by wireweinie View Post
    Know FAR part 43 inside and out. Also get a copy of CAR3 and CAR4 and understand that aircraft certified under these regs are, by law, maintained in accordance with these and NOT part 23. As for the wrench turning, ask questions of the most experienced guys available on any system you might need help with.

    Web
    Thanks Web. The CAR3 and CAR4 area is something they glossed over at school and that I need to get smart on.

    Quote Originally Posted by Grant View Post
    Henny, Congrats!


    • Like Web said - Just ask a lot of questions.
    • Dont believe everything another mechanic says. Learn to look it up for yourself. (Yes, CAR3, CAR03, CAR4, FARs, & AC43 will be invaluable)
    • Regardless of what some say the FAA is not out to get you. There are asshats everywhere but for every one of those there are a half dozen good ones.
    • Figure out who they are and avoid the asshats and lean on the good ones for advice and assistance.
    • A really good one will lead you to, or point you in, the direction of the information you need but not give it to you. That goes for other mechanics and the FAA.
    • If you start to look it up and learn it for yourself then you become familiar with the regs and the reason for them and will become much more confident in your decisions.
    • Mistakes are part of this. Dont be afraid to make them and learn from them. But, learn to quit while you're ahead. Don't work youself into a mistake.
    • Sometimes there is not an easier way. Sometimes you have to just bust your knuckles to get the job done.
    • No one knows it all.... If you find that guy, avoid him.
    • Keep a book and take good notes for any procedure you will do more than once (Gasket/seal/oring/bolt lengths/torques/vendors/experts/etc.)


    Reach out to anyone here for advice or questions.

    Congrats Again! - GOOD ON YA!
    Grant, lots of good advice in here, especially concerning the asshats. I've already got the book started and it keeps growing daily!

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Pierce View Post
    and be careful on those tool trucks. Lots of nice expensive stuff on there. Back in the day pawn shops were a great source for my tools but eBay is a good one now and shopping around for those specialty aviation tools.
    Quote Originally Posted by astjp2 View Post
    Stay out of the Snap-on truck unless you absolutely have to...
    Learned that lesson early as the truck stops by the seaplane base every Thursday. I did take advantage of the Student Excellence Program from Snap-On and purchased a few "necessities".

    Quote Originally Posted by jrussl View Post
    Congrats, Henny!

    Feel free to wander over to my hangar. Could use some help getting a pile of engine parts making noise again.
    Jeff, I would love to fly over to your place and do some wrenching and some flying!

    Quote Originally Posted by dgapilot View Post
    Good on you Henry. Now the learning begins.keep in mind, there are good wrench benders that can’t do paperwork, there are guys that do paperwork well but have trouble with the hands on. Your goal should be to excel at both the hands on and the paperwork side!
    Yep, I've seen that situation up close and personal...

    Quote Originally Posted by 8GCBC View Post
    Get a Borescope and log cylinder trends graphically:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	01BFDF0D-23EB-48CB-9719-31358F8C4395.jpeg 
Views:	262 
Size:	115.5 KB 
ID:	52720
    I bought this model and am pretty happy with it so far: https://www.oasisscientific.com/vivi...on-camera.html Like the way you added the info on the photo. Good stuff.

    Quote Originally Posted by cubdriver2 View Post
    Recognize whats unairworthy and what can be fixed as time and money allow

    Glenn
    Glenn, that is some short and sweet advice. I appreciate it.

    Quote Originally Posted by behindpropellers View Post
    Draw your line in the sand now.

    Only work for people who want quality.
    Only work for people who will pay you what you are worth.


    Say no.

    Say no. Say no.

    My example on this:

    Did your previous mechanic complete this service bulletin? Oh yes.

    Look at plane (wrapped in vinyl) - screws were covered in vinyl on the area required to be removed for the SB.

    And the list continued.

    My take on it.....there is an epidemic brewing of poorly maintained airplanes. Owners don't know what is right or they do not want to pay to have work done correctly. Mechanics are sloppy or they just do not know.

    Tim
    Thanks Tim. Hoping to do my best and produce nothing but quality work.

  26. #26

    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Utah/Alaska
    Posts
    208
    Post Thanks / Like
    Also realize that you can fire customers just like they can fire you. Some customers are just not worth the money due to risk or their personality...I have watched owners bitch and moan when the drive their new Dually chevy and NEW 5th wheel and then tell me they are too broke to fix their airplane and can I just sign it off. UHM no I wont risk my certificate so you can go on vacation for weeks at a time.

  27. #27
    Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    At Work.....
    Posts
    1,836
    Post Thanks / Like
    realize that you can fire customers
    This is SO true. I once had a customer come in several times a day to "Check" on his engine installation. After two days of this I started putting a mark on my toolbox stainless top with a sharpie each time he came in. Within the week that it took I had about 65 marks on my box. I was training Miguel at the time and I explained to him that those marks represented the number of time we are potentially making mistakes. The customer never realized I was putting a mark on my toolbox literally right in front of him. One time, I even interupted him, took out my sharpie and put another mark on the box ant then said to him, " okay, go ahead...." After delivering his airplane he wa so happy with the work that he asked us to do more but I refused.... that I was too busy... or that I could not do it in his timeframe or budget. He asked a few people and finally somone told him he was a PITA and he came in to appologize. I accepted his appology but did not ever do any more work for him. Nice person, just not a good customer. Learn to recognize the difference.
    Thanks Bowie thanked for this post
    Likes astjp2 liked this post

  28. #28

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Southern NH
    Posts
    775
    Post Thanks / Like
    I don’t know Grant, hope there’s more to the story that made him a PITA. Maybe if you told him right off the bat that his frequent visits were a distraction the relationship could have been saved? Maybe do what Mike Scup does and lock the door!
    Likes mike mcs repair liked this post

  29. #29
    algonquin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Seldovia,Ak
    Posts
    1,044
    Post Thanks / Like
    I have a rule if a customer starts to argue about a price I give them I say well I really can’t get to this for a few months , I’ll give it a better look then and we can figure it out. This way no hard feelings And done.
    For the follow you around guy , get your mirror out and start looking where he can’t see and every minute go “OOH, OOPS, HUMMMM” under your breath followed with some minor head shakes. All under your breath. Throw in a few wow this is an expensive repair to do. No looks ok after all. Had to stop once to tell a guy “your fogging the mirror please back up”.

  30. #30

    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Utah/Alaska
    Posts
    208
    Post Thanks / Like
    I had one owner put their head on my shoulder to watch everything I was doing...and would then want to argue about what I found. If you don't like my inspection, go get your own A&P, wait the 3 years, work on airplanes full time and then get your IA and sign off your own crap...

  31. #31
    hotrod180's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Port Townsend, WA
    Posts
    3,332
    Post Thanks / Like
    Kinda interesting to read the comments from the A&P's on the board.
    Yes, customers can be unreasonable...but so can mechanics.
    The good thing is that either side can decide they're not a good match & just walk away.
    Cessna Skywagon-- accept no substitute!
    Likes mam90 liked this post

  32. #32
    WindOnHisNose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Lino Lakes MN (MY18)
    Posts
    4,420
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by mike mcs repair View Post
    never have had insurance.. posted notice on the door... if you think you want that, then go someplace else...
    Wish it worked that way in medicine...
    Likes wireweinie, mike mcs repair liked this post

  33. #33
    WindOnHisNose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Lino Lakes MN (MY18)
    Posts
    4,420
    Post Thanks / Like
    There are so many parallels with what you folks describe and what I do professionally.

    I remember how badly I felt when I had just completed my fellowship and had a patient request records to be sent to another physician. I work hard to go the extra mile in explaining things to patients, trying to be kind and gentle in delivering bad news...and I remember doing significant introspection. And now...many moons later...I recognize that I can't solve everyone's problems, that I can only do my best and that I treat my patients as I would want my family members treated. I still think it to be important to be introspective, especially now that my "give a **** (GAS)" level is exceedingly low. Throw into that mix the internet, which makes everyone an expert, and my GAS level goes even lower.

    It is equally difficult for patients/clients to know how to assess a doc/mechanic. Not all docs are the same, not all mechanics are the same. How are our clients making that decision? Many use online reviews to help with the decision, a few rely on recommendations from their physician, many others use recommendations from their friends or coworkers. I like the latter, as usually birds of a feather flock together and if their friend had a good experience with my care it is likely that we enjoyed caring for them...and will enjoy these patients, too.

    When I see someone for a second opinion, or I see that they have gone to more than one doc for their care for this problem I wait to see how my first interaction goes with them. Many times these people have gotten suboptimal care from others and I know we can do better. They are very frustrated, and I often can understand why. Occasionally the patient starts off bad mouthing the previous doc and I have to make a decision as to if there is good reason for this, or is this just an unhappy person. If I suspect the latter my GAS level helps me end things sooner than later. It is important, though, to know that prospective patients, and your prospective clients, are in a tough spot.

    With mechanics, there isn't Yelp or other online resources available to prospective customers, and to make matters worse it is not often that the choices people have are limited at any specific airport. It may require us to fly out of our airport (where there is a suboptimal mechanic) to one many miles away to "get the job done right". The average aircraft owner isn't likely able to know what "done right" means.

    I do think that for you guys and me life is too short to work with intolerable people. It is likely that if you have problems with a person it is likely that others have problems with that person and it is much easier for all involved to disengage. When it reaches that point for me and a patient I arrange for a free "Come to Jesus" talk, so I can "splain things" to the patient that I am unable to meet their expectations, and that they either adjust their expectations or they go to someone who can meet their needs. It may not be me, and I am OK with that now that I am an old doc.

    ...for what its worth.

    Randy
    Likes DENNY, Henny liked this post

  34. #34

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Southern NH
    Posts
    775
    Post Thanks / Like
    Aircraft owners need mechanics, and mechanics need aircraft owners. Like hotrod said, either can walk away if it becomes intolerable. My mechfriend IA, when he was still working on others light aircraft, would always request the logbooks first. He would review them before he ever agreed to work on a new aircraft, then meet with the owner and discuss if and how the inspection would proceed. Like most things in life, communications and a clear understanding can help quite a bit..
    Can’t we all just get along??
    Likes Steve Pierce liked this post

  35. #35
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Graham, TX
    Posts
    20,366
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by WindOnHisNose View Post
    There are so many parallels with what you folks describe and what I do professionally.

    I remember how badly I felt when I had just completed my fellowship and had a patient request records to be sent to another physician. I work hard to go the extra mile in explaining things to patients, trying to be kind and gentle in delivering bad news...and I remember doing significant introspection. And now...many moons later...I recognize that I can't solve everyone's problems, that I can only do my best and that I treat my patients as I would want my family members treated. I still think it to be important to be introspective, especially now that my "give a **** (GAS)" level is exceedingly low. Throw into that mix the internet, which makes everyone an expert, and my GAS level goes even lower.

    It is equally difficult for patients/clients to know how to assess a doc/mechanic. Not all docs are the same, not all mechanics are the same. How are our clients making that decision? Many use online reviews to help with the decision, a few rely on recommendations from their physician, many others use recommendations from their friends or coworkers. I like the latter, as usually birds of a feather flock together and if their friend had a good experience with my care it is likely that we enjoyed caring for them...and will enjoy these patients, too.

    When I see someone for a second opinion, or I see that they have gone to more than one doc for their care for this problem I wait to see how my first interaction goes with them. Many times these people have gotten suboptimal care from others and I know we can do better. They are very frustrated, and I often can understand why. Occasionally the patient starts off bad mouthing the previous doc and I have to make a decision as to if there is good reason for this, or is this just an unhappy person. If I suspect the latter my GAS level helps me end things sooner than later. It is important, though, to know that prospective patients, and your prospective clients, are in a tough spot.

    With mechanics, there isn't Yelp or other online resources available to prospective customers, and to make matters worse it is not often that the choices people have are limited at any specific airport. It may require us to fly out of our airport (where there is a suboptimal mechanic) to one many miles away to "get the job done right". The average aircraft owner isn't likely able to know what "done right" means.

    I do think that for you guys and me life is too short to work with intolerable people. It is likely that if you have problems with a person it is likely that others have problems with that person and it is much easier for all involved to disengage. When it reaches that point for me and a patient I arrange for a free "Come to Jesus" talk, so I can "splain things" to the patient that I am unable to meet their expectations, and that they either adjust their expectations or they go to someone who can meet their needs. It may not be me, and I am OK with that now that I am an old doc.

    ...for what its worth.

    Randy
    Dang Randy, I couldn't have said it better myself. So may parallels.
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers
    Thanks WindOnHisNose thanked for this post

  36. #36

    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Utah/Alaska
    Posts
    208
    Post Thanks / Like
    I have watched owners mechanic shop just like people doc shop. I have also watched people who are never satisfied and complain about everything including the price. The ones that I like and I have not gotten used to is someone who says "I trust you!"...which is weird compared to others who complain that having spare fuses and a compass card in the airplane is excessive and I am just trying to rip them off. I dont even like buying the parts, I want the owner to provide me the part so if it fails, not my fault if the installation is good. Ok, enough for today. Good luck, Tim

  37. #37
    www.SkupTech.com mike mcs repair's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    chugiak AK
    Posts
    11,733
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by mam90 View Post
    ..Maybe do what Mike Scup does and lock the door!
    I keep the door locked mostly so nobody sneaks up behind me and gives me a heart attack !!! plus I have a witch of a time keeping focused on the paying work... and don't like BS'ers coming around getting me distracted..... I can do that to myself without suggestions from others....

    I usually just give my customers keys to my shop so they can stop by whenever and check progress without needing to match times.... I also have a few different keyed door knobs if that becomes a problem...

  38. #38
    windy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    725
    Post Thanks / Like
    I’d be happy with a mechanic who is competent at more than greasing wheel bearings and safety wiring. It doesn’t inspire trust or confidence in a mechanic if he always has to call a more experienced mechanic to find out what to do. Unfortunately, as an aircraft owner, I’ve paid too much for incompetent mechanics’ mistakes.


    Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org
    Likes DENNY, skywagon8a liked this post

  39. #39
    behindpropellers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    6,867
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by windy View Post
    I’d be happy with a mechanic who is competent at more than greasing wheel bearings and safety wiring. It doesn’t inspire trust or confidence in a mechanic if he always has to call a more experienced mechanic to find out what to do. Unfortunately, as an aircraft owner, I’ve paid too much for incompetent mechanics’ mistakes.


    Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org
    You need to seek out local knowledge.
    Likes windy liked this post

Similar Threads

  1. I need advice!
    By Indabush in forum Member to Member
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 11-22-2010, 02:35 AM
  2. Advice on ELT in J3
    By a3holerman in forum Modifications
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 04-03-2007, 07:40 AM

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •