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Thread: Fabric pros and cons.

  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by skukum12 View Post
    ^^^Part of the otx maintenence procedure is to apply the supplied wax not less than once per year. It provides additional UV protection, luster and allows squished bugs to be wiped off.

    KevinJ, do you know if that test piece was ever waxed?
    That I am unsure of but would lean toward no. The sample, from my understanding, was leaned up against an outbuilding catching the sun like the side of a fuselage would.

  2. #42
    skukum12's Avatar
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    I would suspect no wax either. Regardless, if the OTX was installed on an aircraft, I would be sure to contact Lars at Better Aircraft Fabric and let him know sooner than later. If there is the possibility of a failure, it is always better to be ahead of the game with the manufacturer/retail outfit.
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  3. #43
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    An 'upstanding' member here had a red plane fade like that also. Oratex sent two guys to his house with new fabric and recovered the plane for free. There was a batch of red that did fade, maybe the same lot- time sounds similar.

    I did not intend this to be an Oratex forum, but easy to see that there is lots of information out there, good and bad, and experiences-good and bad, with all fabrics.

    As far as glue, most working planes I am familiar with have enough dust and mud spread all over them a glue spot here and there would probably not be noticed!!

    And Stewart- I should have been more clear, spray while TURNING downwind!
    I don't know where you've been me lad, but I see you won first Prize!
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  4. #44
    skywagon8a's Avatar
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    I have seen red totally disappear from a plane down to the silver in just one season's time. This was butyrate dope. The plane had been kept inside prior to this. The sun sucked the pigment right out. Red is the worst with other dark colors also having a similar tendency.
    N1PA
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  5. #45

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    Back to Stewart system. I like the fact I can paint it with out health affects. I was wanting the option of using auto fuel so what can be done to mitigate that ? I like the sales pitch for oritec but I’m not convinced of its longevity
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  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zook View Post
    Back to Stewart system. I like the fact I can paint it with out health affects. I was wanting the option of using auto fuel so what can be done to mitigate that ? I like the sales pitch for oritec but I’m not convinced of its longevity
    I see this stated quite often. Have any of you looked at the MSDS? Just because you thin it with water does NOT mean there are no health affects.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zook View Post
    Back to Stewart system. I like the fact I can paint it with out health affects. I was wanting the option of using auto fuel so what can be done to mitigate that ? I like the sales pitch for oritec but I’m not convinced of its longevity
    https://www.supercub.org/forum/showt...em-Paint/page4
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
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  8. #48
    Hardtailjohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ak49flyer View Post
    Not to pick a fight, but what steps are taken to prevent reaction with the full coat? And how about the glue? I’ve seen Alaska (non-ethanol) car gas loosen/soft/lift the Ekobond glue on multiple airplanes.
    We seal the fuel tank areas with a brushed through topcoat...from the outside in. If you can do it, shooting the inside of tank bays with topcoat will prevent any problems too, but that's not always an option. It's all in the latest manual revision.
    I've seen some car gas that will attack about anything, including the "other" systems' adhesives, and yet other car gas wont. I've seen samples immersed in it for months and no problem. Who knows what they put in there on some blends...I know I saw some additives that are put in unlead when I was hauling fuel, that would eat through a stainless container in a matter of weeks. I'm not sure I want to know what's in that!!
    John

  9. #49
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    I recently did a repair using the Ceconite process in an unheated hanger. The instructions said there was no minimum temperature. The repair turned out fine.
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  10. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardtailjohn View Post
    We seal the fuel tank areas with a brushed through topcoat...from the outside in. If you can do it, shooting the inside of tank bays with topcoat will prevent any problems too, but that's not always an option. It's all in the latest manual revision.
    And as soon as it runs under the rear spar to the non-top coated area you can’t access, or over the top of the tank to the glue line along the aft edge of the tank bay, you have issues. Agree that not all auto fuel is created equal- just sharing my experience with AK fuel...
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  11. #51

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    This auto fuel issue, we talking about fuel with ethanol or Non ethanol? Or is this to do with other traits of the fuel?
    Regards, Charlie
    Super Coupe E-AB build in process

  12. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by ak49flyer View Post
    And as soon as it runs under the rear spar to the non-top coated area you can’t access, or over the top of the tank to the glue line along the aft edge of the tank bay, you have issues. Agree that not all auto fuel is created equal- just sharing my experience with AK fuel...
    Why couldn't you access that? Like I said, from the outside in. It's had reactions from other states too...your fuel up there isn't really special, but there's some things that are blended into auto fuel that are really something! The standard for blending is very open ended. It's also like Jason said, a lot has to do with how long it sets on it. Also like I said, I've seen the same from other systems' adhesives. Every system out there has a drawback, and I've seen more than a few in the last 37 years. I've personally never had a problem with auto fuel and what is now Stewart's, but I've seen a few, but I don't let any system sit there and soak in it, if I can help it. I've never seen a problem from a spill, but have seen reactions from a leak that wasn't detected for a few days. There's literally thousands of aircraft out there covered with it, and very very few problems, but as we all know, bad news travels faster than any good news, and gets repeated forever, so they keep popping up from time to time.
    I wish it was impervious to everything! But, I've yet to find anything that is!

    Here's an excerpt from the current manual:

    Stewart SystemsSection 10Procedure ManualRev. #4 07/01/19__________________________________________________ ____________________Safe for You, Safe for your Airplane, Safe for the World42safe. Where there currently may be an issue is when exposure to auto gas on theinside of the fabric system occurs, especially if exposed for an extended period of time. Auto fuel may soften EkoBond, and possibly loosen a tape or a glue seam. However, once the fuel leak is stopped and the fuel evaporates from the EkoBond, it generally returns to its normal state and is not affected any further from that point on. After exposure, clean thoroughly with EkoClean and inspect for any loose seams or tapesand repair as necessary. Exposure on the inside of the fabric in some cases may also cause delamintation of the EkoBond, EkoFill and therefore EkoPoly from the fabric. There are several techniques that can be used to mitigate this risk. 1)On the inside of fuel tank bays, fuselage low points and areas where fuel lines run, seal the inside of the fabric by painting it with EkoPoly Premium. This can be sprayed if convenient but can also be brushed or rolled. If it is not possible to access the inside of the tank bay, it is acceptable to seal the weave of the bare fabric in that area with EkoPoly Premium from the outside. Clear EkoPoly Premium is the best for that application. Mix it normally as you would for a spray application,but a slightly heavier viscosity may be desired. It will need lightly scuffed before applying EkoFill for good adhesion.2)Make sure that drain grommets are installed in low points that would allow leaked fuel to escape rather than puddle on the fabric. 3)When assembling the aircraft, test the fuel systems for leaks carefully. Run 100LL in the first tank full to check for leaks. 4)In areas near a fuel fill or vent, it is a common practice to mask the filler neck and apply EkoFill and EkoPoly premium and then remove the masking. Doing so will create a cross section that allows spilled fuel to wick into the EkoFill and may cause minor blistering around that edge. Sealing that edge with EkoPoly Premium will eliminate that possibility. Look for any other edges like that which could be exposed inadvertently to auto fuel and seal them.

    John

  13. #53
    Hardtailjohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CharlieN View Post
    This auto fuel issue, we talking about fuel with ethanol or Non ethanol? Or is this to do with other traits of the fuel?
    It's on non-ethanol fuel as well. Like I said above, there's stuff in some auto fuel that'll eat anything. For the vast majority of auto fuel, it's a complete non-issue.
    John

  14. #54

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    Nothing is simple anymore.
    Regards, Charlie
    Super Coupe E-AB build in process
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  15. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by akavidflyer View Post
    I see this stated quite often. Have any of you looked at the MSDS? Just because you thin it with water does NOT mean there are no health affects.
    Yep, any polyurethane is catalyzed with an isocyanide. But, the difference is the amount needed to achieve the affect with a waterborne polyurethane is a fraction of what is needed for a solvent borne polyurethane. The aggressiveness that the isocyanide "searches" for a "moisture host" is greatly reduced also, because there's water in the mixture. You still don't want to drink the catalyst or get it on bare skin, but it's not anywhere nearly as aggressive as a solvent borne. It's attracted to moisture, and guess what....we're mostly moisture!
    I was young and bullet proof (and stupid) for a long time, shooting polyurethanes without the proper gear, and landed in the hospital for it. I wouldn't wish that on my worst enemy!! It (for the most part) never leaves your body, so from that point on, if you survive, you're very sensitive to it!! I can taste it for a long time before I can smell it, and am very cautious about being around any paint booth or even a fresh paint job that is still gassing out. The most dangerous point of ANY catalyzed paint is when you pour the catalyst in, as then it's a "free radical" and searching. I can't tell you how many times I've mixed and then went to get suited up or whatever....
    John
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  16. #56

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    One thing this thread and similar have done is make me aware that I need to keep my air supply on for the full job. For decades I have done my share of mixing without the mask on. When I can I mix outdoors and stand with my back to the breeze. I doubt that I have taken to much in with all the two part I have sprayed in pools and many gallons of Imron and associated coatings over 40 years. I will be spraying again at the other end of the cold season.
    Regards, Charlie
    Super Coupe E-AB build in process
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  17. #57

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    Hardtailjohn, I’m sorry, I didn’t see the part in your post about from the outside in. I don’t recall that or any mention of auto fuel in the revision of the manual that I used several years ago- as I remember, they recommended top coating the inside of the tank bay, which I did. I didn’t intend this as negative toward Stewart’s- I know they’ve fought their share of negativity- I just thought it worth mentioning when the OP was asking about various systems.
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  18. #58
    www.SkupTech.com mike mcs repair's Avatar
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    The closest I cam to dying was mixing stitts primer on a high countertop by my face. I was maybe 19 or 20. Took a big breath of that and coughed. Then my lungs didn’t want to inhale anymore. Lucky my boss and another guy were there and got me outside. I always wear a mask mixing now


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  19. #59
    aktango58's Avatar
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    Remember the portion absorbed through your eye tissue!

    I was on a crew painting the interior of a housing complex in college. We were using oil trim paint and spraying latex for the majority of the walls.

    Usually at the end of the day I looked like a speckled duck. We learned to shower in the morning, use conditioner and not rinse it out. It was so hot we tried to wear as little cover gear as possible.

    We changed paint brands about 2/3 of the way through. I was doing lots of oil trim work in small places, and since we were behind and I was a broke college student, we were working all the hours we could. I remember that I wore a canister respirator, knowing it was insufficient- but positive pressure systems were not common back then. After a couple days with the new oil paint I had to quit early, (10-12 hours was all), because I started to get a head ache. The third day that week at noon I went down heaving my guts out. I tried to go back inside and paint the next day, made it an hour.

    Young and dumb, I did realize I had accumulated lots of toxins in my body, and it was about to have a major issue. I packed my bags and went hunting for two weeks, and still avoid painting fumes and enclosed space.
    I don't know where you've been me lad, but I see you won first Prize!
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  20. #60
    Hardtailjohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ak49flyer View Post
    Hardtailjohn, I’m sorry, I didn’t see the part in your post about from the outside in. I don’t recall that or any mention of auto fuel in the revision of the manual that I used several years ago- as I remember, they recommended top coating the inside of the tank bay, which I did. I didn’t intend this as negative toward Stewart’s- I know they’ve fought their share of negativity- I just thought it worth mentioning when the OP was asking about various systems.
    Not a problem at all...I didn't see it as that, and all were very valid questions! The reason you didn't see it in that manual was that it wasn't there yet! Andy came up with the idea and I implemented it on some test panels and then wings, to try to figure out the easiest and most effective way to get it done. We've done a bunch of shop time, working on solutions and are still always striving to make it better!!
    One thing I'm very thankful for is that the fabric industry has come so far in the last 20 years or so!! I think it really started to improve when Jon Goldenbaum rewrote the Poly Fiber manual. It went from about 15 small type pages to the book that explained it all, and in layman's terms that we could all understand!! That set a benchmark for all the other systems, and it still stands today. When I went to A&P school, our entire fabric course was a day. Basically they told us to take this glue and glue the fabric here and here, then put your iron on the "cotton" setting and iron it. Looking back, I shudder to think of how much we did "wrong" on that job!! The best part was when the instructor set the iron on the top surface of the Pawnee wing and it melted right through not only the top fabric, but out the bottom!! Yeah, quality instruction, right there! Now we have plenty of weekend courses for every system, great manuals, and the internet resources....a far cry from 37 years ago!!
    John
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  21. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zook View Post
    I am building a new cub from a kit that came from nick smith. Great guys to work with. I’m also getting some parts from jay at Javron. We are hoping to cover it this winter and was wanting some input on what you all would use for fabric and why. We plan on putting it on floats so it will sit outside all summer and be in the hanger in the winter.
    If I were in your shoes, I’m assuming little or no experience with fabric covering, I’d go with Polyfiber system. Simple, time tested and hard to screw up.
    if you don’t have experience with urethane, finish it in polytone, durable, easy to spray, not as toxic as two parts, and easy to repair.
    Lots of discussion around Stewart’s, if I covered for a living I’d switch and learn Stewart’s system. But for every happy Stewart’s customer there’s someone with less than ideal results, and some horror stories. Very finicky and unforgiving process.

    My 2c
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  22. #62
    skywagon8a's Avatar
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    Zook, Where is your shop located, is it attached to your house? IF so, fumes from any system will find their way inside. Whoever you live with will not be happy. In this case the Stewarts system is the best.

    Also, since it appears you are a greenhorn at doing fabric work on airplanes, you will be starting from scratch with the learning curve. The techniques aren't much different between the many systems. The fabric itself is the same. The different processes is in the chemicals which go on the cloth.

    I'm an old dope and Irish linen fabric person, done lot's of it. For my last project, primarily due to the proximity to my house but also because of the use of water rather than harsh chemicals, I used the Stewarts system. It was a bit different but not difficult. The only issue I had was in spraying the final color coats when the ambient temperature was not warm enough. I got some runs on the rudder which had to be sanded out and resprayed.

    aktango's story of the toxins being a health issue is something everyone should pay close attention to. I knew a fellow who worked with all these various chemicals as an A&P mechanic for many years. He died at a young age from the after effects of those chemicals.
    N1PA
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  23. #63
    Crash, Jr.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oliver View Post
    If I were in your shoes, I’m assuming little or no experience with fabric covering, I’d go with Polyfiber system. Simple, time tested and hard to screw up.
    if you don’t have experience with urethane, finish it in polytone, durable, easy to spray, not as toxic as two parts, and easy to repair.
    Lots of discussion around Stewart’s, if I covered for a living I’d switch and learn Stewart’s system. But for every happy Stewart’s customer there’s someone with less than ideal results, and some horror stories. Very finicky and unforgiving process.

    My 2c
    I would echo this. I've seen a lot of issues with Stewarts system that were always "the installers lack of experience" or inability to follow directions according to the Stewarts system people. If it's that complicated to get a coat of paint on that doesn't bubble up and peel off the fabric then I'd stay away as someone with less experience.

    Polyfiber/Stits/Airtech are all pretty well ironed out systems and with a minimal investment in a fresh air system, painters suit, and a spray booth you should be able to get great results that will last a long time. Weight is all in how much primer and paint you decide to lay on.

    *edit* Just some interesting numbers after talking to the guy from Airtech: Oratex is ~17 grams/square foot, Airtech 31-35g/sq.ft with 3x primer coats, and Airtech 23g/sq.ft with 2 cross coats of primer sanded between and 2x light coats of top coat. 650-700 square feet of fabric on a cub. Oratex does very much save 10-12lbs per my math
    Last edited by Crash, Jr.; 11-25-2020 at 01:12 PM.
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  24. #64
    Hardtailjohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oliver View Post
    But for every happy Stewart’s customer there’s someone with less than ideal results, and some horror stories. Very finicky and unforgiving process.

    My 2c
    BS!!! I'd love to see where you come up with those numbers! It's amazing, the negative that comes from people with no experience with a product. There's literally thousands of users, most with no experience, that have done just fine with it. I always have to grin when I hear about the brother's uncle's sister's brother in law that did it just exactly to the instructions and it just wont work. If it's such a bad product, how come it works for anyone? I'm not here to argue about hearsay. I try not to comment on things I don't have experience with. Poly Fiber and all the other systems are great too...but there's nothing wrong with Stewarts, and it's not hard...I've only been teaching people how to use it since 1997. I still haven't had anyone come out of a class saying how impossible it is. I've seen issues/failures of every major system out there. It happens. It just gets really tiring when it gets exaggerated just to make it sound worse.
    John
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  25. #65

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    so a new turn, is there a covering system thats forgiving of mistakes? or doing things wrong?
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  26. #66

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    Did the Cub with polyfiber, then did the Stinson with Stewart’s. Worked fine, per instructions and was really nice not dealing with the fumes.

  27. #67

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardtailjohn View Post
    BS!!! I'd love to see where you come up with those numbers! It's amazing, the negative that comes from people with no experience with a product. There's literally thousands of users, most with no experience, that have done just fine with it. I always have to grin when I hear about the brother's uncle's sister's brother in law that did it just exactly to the instructions and it just wont work. If it's such a bad product, how come it works for anyone? I'm not here to argue about hearsay. I try not to comment on things I don't have experience with. Poly Fiber and all the other systems are great too...but there's nothing wrong with Stewarts, and it's not hard...I've only been teaching people how to use it since 1997. I still haven't had anyone come out of a class saying how impossible it is. I've seen issues/failures of every major system out there. It happens. It just gets really tiring when it gets exaggerated just to make it sound worse.
    John
    John,

    My personal experience with Stewarts:

    Two years ago my hangar partner purchased a cub, beautiful plane, rebuilt in 2014 by a very reputable builder, covered with Stewarts.
    Only issue was a previously leaking fuel valve, fuel had run down inside of fabric and followed lower longeron back a couple feet. painted fabric around fuel affected area was stained and blistered.
    A local Stewarts "expert" was contacted to assess repair. Said when he was done the repair would be unnoticeable. Well, it was noticable and ended up at a paint shop where they sanded out the patched area and shot it with color matched urethane and blended the edges.

    Recently the plane was flipped over, during recovery process I taped some padding to the fuselage. When I later removed the tape, with it came all of the coatings right down to the fabric. My original plan was to preserve fuselage fabric, that went out the window for how does one repair areas of peeling paint??! When's the rest going to fail?

    Lastly, while I was stripping fabric from wings, the resulting pile on the floor showed two distinct colors of orange, that which was removed from the top of the wing, and that from the bottom. Under normal circumstances one does not view the top and bottom of the wing simultaneously, so not a big ussue. but the color fade was alarming for a hangared cub.

    Im not bashing on Stewarts, In fact I said id learn to use it if I were in the business of covering planes for a living. However, I dont cover planes for a living so my exposure to harsh chemicals is limited, more so, because I take appropriate protective measures.
    The thought of eating a cover job because paint peeled - FOR WHATEVER REASON, is unacceptable to me.
    Therefor I will stick with a process that I am familiar with. Time tested, durable, easy to source, easy to patch, forgiving and east to apply.

    Again, my 2c

    Doug
    Last edited by Oliver; 11-25-2020 at 07:03 PM.
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  28. #68

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    Fuselage
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    faded paint
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  29. #69
    akavidflyer's Avatar
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    What kind of tape did you use?

  30. #70
    www.SkupTech.com mike mcs repair's Avatar
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    Fabric pros and cons.

    Quote Originally Posted by tempdoug View Post
    so a new turn, is there a covering system thats forgiving of mistakes? or doing things wrong?
    Dope. Piper put it on with a MOP. (War time?)

    dope is still my number one choice... stitts number 2

    Doing superflite now only by customers choice, probably won’t use it again, unless customer begs

    Things I will not use oratex, Stewart’s... oratex looks horrible and needs wax. Too many horror stories on Stewart’s, I went to the demo by Jason years ago...


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  31. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike mcs repair View Post
    Dope. Piper put it on with a MOP. (War time?)

    dope is still my number one choice... stitts number 2

    Doing superflite now only by customers choice, probably won’t use it again, unless customer begs

    Things I will not use oratex, Stewart’s... oratex looks horrible and needs wax. Too many horror stories on Stewart’s, I went to the demo by Jason years ago...


    Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org mobile app
    But, would you use Oratex if appearance was not a deciding factor? That is the question, from a guy satisfied with a mat Poly-Tone finish. I'm more concerned with the view out the windshield, and for it's APPARENT advantages, I could care less how it looks as long as it gets the job done.

  32. #72
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    100% agree with dope being forgiving of bad technique. If I can shoot dope and make it look good, anyone can.

    Web
    Life's tough . . . wear a cup.

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    So Stewart’s sounds like the nicest from a chemical point. What about the old dope system. So is there less fumes if it’s brushed on? Is this an option? Can all systems be sanded? Does the paint coat smell as bad as the rest of the layers ? I’m not looking for a show piece as it will spend most of its life in the bush. There is living space atta he’d to where we are working so we might have to wait tell we can work out side in the summer

  34. #74
    www.SkupTech.com mike mcs repair's Avatar
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    Fabric pros and cons.

    Quote Originally Posted by courierguy View Post
    But, would you use Oratex if appearance was not a deciding factor? That is the question, from a guy satisfied with a mat Poly-Tone finish. I'm more concerned with the view out the windshield, and for it's APPARENT advantages, I could care less how it looks as long as it gets the job done.
    Oratex is a half assed product/finish not interested in turning out that kind of work from my shop. Non starter.


    Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org mobile app

  35. #75
    www.SkupTech.com mike mcs repair's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zook View Post
    So Stewart’s sounds like the nicest from a chemical point. What about the old dope system. So is there less fumes if it’s brushed on? Is this an option? Can all systems be sanded? Does the paint coat smell as bad as the rest of the layers ? I’m not looking for a show piece as it will spend most of its life in the bush. There is living space atta he’d to where we are working so we might have to wait tell we can work out side in the summer
    First guy I worked with said they did there Cubs with dope in the living room with the WOOD STOVE. I would highly recommend against that being flammable


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  36. #76

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    Zook,
    With the amount of time and money you’ll have invested in this, it would be in your best interest to do a good job covering. Both for resale, durability and pride.
    Not black magic as some would have you believe. And quite gratifying when done under the right circumstances and with good results.
    Regardless of system you choose, you’ll definitely need an enclosed area. depending on where you live, may need climate control. You WILL need to spray, your ability with a spray gun may determine what system you use.
    I would recommend you locate someone who’s covering a plane and offer to apprentice. Might be some travel involved but it will be time and money well spent.
    Stewarts occasionally has seminars, maybe worth looking to.

    This discussion is turning into a Ford vs Chevy thing. I’ve obviously stepped on some toes expressing my opinion so I’ll leave it at that.



    Doug
    Likes skywagon8a, Hardtailjohn liked this post

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    interesting photo on why that even happened like that? like something was wrapped around it in those 2 spots, taking the fabric cleaner off or adding something to it???

  38. #78

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    This discussion is turning into a Ford vs Chevy thing. I’ve obviously stepped on some toes expressing my opinion so I’ll leave it at that.

    so many it’s time to talk about religion now. Lol

  39. #79
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    You asked for opinions and experiences so here goes. I have been a rookie with Polyfiber, Ceconite (Dope), and Stewart systems. They all have odors and require masks in my opinion. The Dope and Polyfiber layers seem to melt into each other. The Polyfiber poly tone paint cracked behind the leading edge of the horizontal stabilizer after a few years but i used rejuvenator and applied a new topcoat and it looks fine now. I don’t think the Stewart system can be rejuvenated. Since the Stewart system uses water the room temperature and humidity has an influence on the drying characteristics. I had an interior shop but had some difficulty keeping the minimum temperature. I am told that too hot can also be a problem. If you follow the instructions and temps and times the system can work. If you don’t you can make more work for yourself. I had to sand off a layer of primer. The problems I had with the Stewarts System was that the Yellow topcoat was not very opaque so coverage was not very good at hiding variations in the primer color. It took a lot more topcoat than I had intended so make sure the primer layer is all the same. The other problem was that a small fuel leak from a quick drain caused the glue to let go with non ethanol auto fuel. The damaged area was confined to an inspection ring area so it wasn’t a major problem. Take your time, follow instructions exactly, protect yourself, and have fun. Big visible changes occur quite quickly so it is fun to see the progress being made.

  40. #80
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    Just seems like Stewart’s system has paint adhesion issues. Every problem I’ve heard of is either water pockets under the paint or paint peeling off fabric.

    Oratex, I’ll have to disagree with Mike on. I know of quite a few planes with Oratex that look pretty good and the fabric holds up decently well. Maybe not as shiny long term as Imron or Airtech but 10-15lbs saved us a meaningful amount and it’s easy to patch/repair. Biggest downside IMO is it’s extreme cost.
    Likes pfm, barrow pilot liked this post

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