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Thread: Seasonal oil change?

  1. #1
    -AV8R-'s Avatar
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    Seasonal oil change?

    So, my new (to me) Legend cub was delivered to CT from TX last week. After a solid week waiting out blustery IFR conditions, I'm dying to get my first solo flight in it, and the weather has finally cleared and the wind died down. Its a perfect day save for one thing. We had a dramatic temperature drop yesterday, with snow, and its below freezing today. My lycoming O-233 was delivered with 100W oil, and the book calls for 15W-20W oil in colder temperatures. This started me wondering about several questions.

    - My Hangar usually doesn't go below 40 degrees, so its probably fine to start the engine, but I don't know. I don't have a pre-heater, and wouldn't even use it above freezing temps anyway. I would normally do the oil change, throw some 15W-50 in it and be done, but it got me wondering. What difference does it make if the engine operating temp and oil temps are within acceptable range anyway? Is it just at the engine start that it matters? Because in spring and fall 50-70 degree temp range on the ground you can easily find below freezing temps at altitude and operate there for hours. even with a summer weight oil the engine may be operated in below freezing temps at altitude, so when is it the recommended oil viscosity REALLY matters? at start. or in the air? I want to go fly, but do not want to damage my engine. Its got summer weight oil in it, and I can start it near 40 degrees, by starting it very soon after pulling it out of the hangar, but from the minute I leave the hangar its in freezing temps.
    Last edited by -AV8R-; 10-31-2020 at 09:42 AM.

  2. #2
    Charlie Longley's Avatar
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    I just run Philips 20W50 year round.

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    Bill.Brine's Avatar
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    You need to get the engine block to 60 degrees F before you start. (Search forums for an easy electric preheater system sourced parts from big box hardware store.)
    Then go fly the plane.
    When your done for the day dump the 100 oil and drop in 20/50.
    Welcome to New England.
    Be sure to visit us at Katama with the new Cub.
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  4. #4

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    Preheat and fly it.
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    ^^^^^! What Stewartb said.

  6. #6
    -AV8R-'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill.Brine View Post
    You need to get the engine block to 60 degrees F before you start. (Search forums for an easy electric preheater system sourced parts from big box hardware store.)
    Then go fly the plane.
    When your done for the day dump the 100 oil and drop in 20/50.
    Welcome to New England.
    Be sure to visit us at Katama with the new Cub.
    Will Do!

  7. #7
    hotrod180's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill.Brine View Post
    You need to get the engine block to 60 degrees F before you start. ......
    Where'd that number come from?
    From the Reiff website:

    Teledyne-Continental Service Information Letter No. SIL 03-1
    COLD WEATHER OPERATION – ENGINE PREHEATING
    Preheating is required whenever the engine has been exposed to temperatures at or below 20° Fahrenheit / -7 degrees Centigrade (wind chill factor) for a period of two hours or more.
    Failure to properly preheat a cold-soaked engine may result in oil congealing within the engine, oil hoses, and oil cooler with subsequent loss of oil flow, possible internal damage to the engine, and subsequent engine failure.
    Superficial application of preheat to a cold soaked engine can cause damage to the engine. An inadequate application of preheat may warm the engine enough to permit starting but will not de-congeal oil in the sump, lines, cooler, filter, etc. Congealed oil in these areas will require considerable preheat.
    The engine may start and appear to run satisfactorily, but can be damaged from lack of lubrication due to the congealed oil blocking proper oil flow through the engine. The amount of damage will vary and may not become evident for many hours. However, the engine may be severely damaged and may fail shortly following application of high power. Proper procedures require thorough application of preheat to all parts of the engine.
    Do not operate the engine at speeds above 1700 RPM unless oil temperature is 75°Fahrenheit or higher and oil pressure is within specified limits of 30-60 PSI.
    Operation of the engine above 1700 RPM before reaching minimum oil temperature may result inengine malfunction, engine failure, injury or death.

    and


    Lycoming Service Instruction No. 1505 Cold Weather Starting
    In extremely low temperatures, oil congeals, battery capacity is lowered, and the starter can be overworked. Improper cold weather starting can result in abnormal engine wear, reduced performance, shortened time between overhauls, or failure for the engine to operate properly.
    The use of pre-heat will facilitate starting during cold weather, and is required when the engine has been allowed to drop to temperatures below +10°F/-12°C (+20°F/-6°C for –76 series engine models).
    Cessna Skywagon-- accept no substitute!

  8. #8

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    I would say that the start up is the most important part when selecting oil viscosity. In flight the oil temps should be between 180-220 and all the oils will handle that temp. If you are pushing the limit during flight than of course a thicker viscosity is preferred. BUT, it is very important to get oil flowing when you start the engine. The Average Ambient Air Temp at startup for 100W is 60 degrees. Your hanger is 40 degrees so the answer is simple and cheap, change the oil to the recommended weight and go fly worry free. If you live in the North country you should always have a way to preheat, you never know when you may not make it home to that warm hanger. I run Philips 20W50 with Camguard year round and usually don't worry about preheat until below 30 degrees. Google Service instruction 1014N for the fine points.
    DENNY
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    -AV8R-'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DENNY View Post
    I would say that the start up is the most important part when selecting oil viscosity. In flight ... DENNY
    Thanks, I went through the operations manual this morning and downloaded the updated service instruction (No. 1014N dated July 29, 2020) it’s not specific to the YO-233, but it says it’s applicable to ALL Lycoming opposed cylinder engines.

    I also ordered some 15W-50 and filters.




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  10. #10

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    Don't put that 15-50 in until you're positive your break-in is complete. Factory says 50 hours for that.
    Thanks barrow pilot thanked for this post

  11. #11
    -AV8R-'s Avatar
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    So the hangar was at 60 degrees, so I was able to get my first solo today! It was really calm, so it was a nice first solo. Oil temp hung around 170 the whole flight. Will change the oil when it arrives. Thanks everyone who gave me feedback!!


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  12. #12
    -AV8R-'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stewartb View Post
    Don't put that 15-50 in until you're positive your break-in is complete. Factory says 50 hours for that.
    It’s not brand new. Had about 300hrs on it.


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  13. #13
    Bill.Brine's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=hotrod180;787244]Where'd that number come from?

    Lycoming service instruction publish this past summer.

    https://www.lycoming.com/sites/defau...mendations.pdf


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  14. #14
    windy's Avatar
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    Seasonal oil change?

    I used Phillips 20-50xc Type M mineral oil to break in my newly overhauled engine. The Type M oil is in a black container, whereas the regular Phillips 20-50xc is in blue containers. It’s handy to use the multi-grade oil when it is cold outside and it’s an oil approved by Lycoming for engine break-in.
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