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Thread: How many Husky Drivers?

  1. #81

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    Quote Originally Posted by mvivion View Post
    Two to three hours to install amphibs sounds pretty light, even on a second or third install.....but,

    I ran Huskys that went from wheels to floats and back seasonally. Change never took over 3 hours or so. These were straight floats.

    Yes, bungees are a bit of a pain, but as John says, the new bungee material won't hold up for 20 years like the old gear bungees used to do. So, it's not a bad idea to have new bungees every year in any case, and they're not obscenely expensive.

    The new Huskys have a different gear, with shock struts internally in place of the bungees. Never saw one apart, so not sure how that works, but I'm betting it'll make gear changes a piece of cake.

    MTV
    Mike,
    Think the bungees are still there with the shocks, believe they just dampen the bounce?
    John

  2. #82

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    Quote Originally Posted by mvivion View Post
    Two to three hours to install amphibs sounds pretty light, even on a second or third install.....but,

    I ran Huskys that went from wheels to floats and back seasonally. Change never took over 3 hours or so. These were straight floats.

    Yes, bungees are a bit of a pain, but as John says, the new bungee material won't hold up for 20 years like the old gear bungees used to do. So, it's not a bad idea to have new bungees every year in any case, and they're not obscenely expensive.

    The new Huskys have a different gear, with shock struts internally in place of the bungees. Never saw one apart, so not sure how that works, but I'm betting it'll make gear changes a piece of cake.

    MTV
    Since you are familiar with straight floats, labor time and parts, what would be the difference Husky vs Cub
    going from wheels to floats and back again?

  3. #83
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    6 1380 bungee cords on a Husky, they are a bitch in my opinion. Had to beef up my tool to stretch them. $32.75 x 6 for 1380 and if you want 1380HDs they are $81.75 each.

    Installing Cub gear on a Husky is a lot of work with lots of welding, sleeving the tubes all the way up to the panel.
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    Steve Pierce

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  4. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by MoJo View Post
    Since you are familiar with straight floats, labor time and parts, what would be the difference Husky vs Cub
    going from wheels to floats and back again?
    Maybe an hour or a bit more.

    MTV

  5. #85
    WhiskeyMike's Avatar
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    I had a couple of Huskys. They were useful...lot of bang for the buck. Very fast, 50 gallons fuel, relatively new airframes (vs. 1946 PA-12) No wing strut issues, tail didn't shake. Good muffler system. Downside... flew a bit strange compared to a PA-18, slightly hard to get in and out of compared to a PA18, maintenance issues with MT props (got a Hartzell CF, end of troubles). expensive parts, trim system springs and cogs wear out. tail wire upgrades become more and more necessary, after wire broke in flight. Cheaper than outfitting a PA-18 with the same goodies, but never ever going to be a Super Cub, and they look chubby. Oh yeah, they have cooling issues even in no work environment. tight cowls. Still pretty good machine, and lower cost ot buy an older one. Last of all - they'll scalp you.

  6. #86
    mvivion's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by john schwamm View Post
    Mike,
    Think the bungees are still there with the shocks, believe they just dampen the bounce?
    John
    John,

    That May be. Never seen them open, just pics.

    MTV

  7. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvivion View Post
    John,

    That May be. Never seen them open, just pics.

    MTV
    Yep, bungees still there with the new “shock” gear.

  8. #88
    Bill.Brine's Avatar
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    Unlike a Cub every Husky has a five point harness attached directly to the airframe. Not just weld on tabs, bolted to the seat base or who knows what was cobbled together in 1977 with a well intentioned owner manufactured part, but a harness that is attached directly to the tubular airframe structure.
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  9. #89

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill.Brine View Post
    Unlike a Cub every Husky has a five point harness attached directly to the airframe. Not just weld on tabs, bolted to the seat base or who knows what was cobbled together in 1977 with a well intentioned owner manufactured part, but a harness that is attached directly to the tubular airframe structure.
    I have seen a simple fix for that. Seatbelts attached to vinyl coated cable rapped around the frame.

  10. #90

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    Quote Originally Posted by WhiskeyMike View Post
    I had a couple of Huskys. They were useful...lot of bang for the buck. Very fast, 50 gallons fuel, relatively new airframes (vs. 1946 PA-12) No wing strut issues, tail didn't shake. Good muffler system. Downside... flew a bit strange compared to a PA-18, slightly hard to get in and out of compared to a PA18, maintenance issues with MT props (got a Hartzell CF, end of troubles). expensive parts, trim system springs and cogs wear out. tail wire upgrades become more and more necessary, after wire broke in flight. Cheaper than outfitting a PA-18 with the same goodies, but never ever going to be a Super Cub, and they look chubby. Oh yeah, they have cooling issues even in no work environment. tight cowls. Still pretty good machine, and lower cost ot buy an older one. Last of all - they'll scalp you.
    . But still.. there I was two days ago, 92 mph and cruising along at 60 mph ground speed.

  11. #91
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    Seat base is part of the airframe.
    New pilots seat folds forward.
    This airframe was on its back.



    Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org mobile app

  12. #92
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    Do you have any idea what that fuselage weighed?? I have asked that question for years as a comparison to a cub and have never gotten an answer.

  13. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyingde View Post
    Do you have any idea what that fuselage weighed?? I have asked that question for years as a comparison to a cub and have never gotten an answer.
    No idea.

    My guess is a ~20-30 lbs more. Lots more structure, tabs and just more to it.

    Listening to the folks in Afton I get the feeling they err toward durability and safty over weight savings.
    That plus gizmos, CS prop, Oregon aero cushions, 50 gallon tanks result in 1,300 lbs planes.


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  14. #94
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill.Brine View Post
    Unlike a Cub every Husky has a five point harness attached directly to the airframe. Not just weld on tabs, bolted to the seat base or who knows what was cobbled together in 1977 with a well intentioned owner manufactured part, but a harness that is attached directly to the tubular airframe structure.
    Most Super Cubs that have been rebuilt in the last 20 years have Atlee Dodge STC'd seat belts to the floor. Several threads here on SuperCub.org on that modification.
    Steve Pierce

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  15. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Pierce View Post
    Most Super Cubs that have been rebuilt in the last 20 years have Atlee Dodge STC'd seat belts to the floor. Several threads here on SuperCub.org on that modification.
    This mod was a must for my Cub rebuild thanks to the folks here at SC.org making me aware of it. It requires a bit of justification since my airplane was born a J3 (the STC covers the PA-11 and PA-1 but was converted to a PA-11 configuration. The PA-18 has much better structure for shoulder harnesses, though. But, just about anything is better than nothing in terms of shoulder harnesses in an old airplane.

    I recall there was some report on shoulder harnesses in the PA-18 that showed they actually made the airplane itself fare better in a crash because of the way the compressive forced worked. Iíve never seen it but maybe someone knows of it?

    There is no doubt that a Part 23 airframe is built solidly, and that carries a weight penalty. Itís not necessarily a bad thing, though in Aviatís case the lack of adjustable seat until 2018 certainly was a mistake that cost some sales. I was flying a 2017 Husky and I was given carpet samples to stack to get the right spot in addition to a cushion. I am glad to see the new seat for the shorties like me as it adds flexibility and comfort to the modern safety standards.

    óAmy
    Proud owner of a collection of airplane pieces (sometimes in one big piece) known as the Oklahoma Kid.

  16. #96

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    I own a 2004 A1-B and a 1946 J3C-65. I fly them both, and have flown the Husky across the US twice - once to AK, and once to WA. I just fly the J3 locally.

  17. #97
    Cubus Maximus's Avatar
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  18. #98
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    Interesting! What is that?

  19. #99

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    Quote Originally Posted by mvivion View Post
    First question you should be asking when someone tells you about the Husky is: "How much Husky time do YOU have?" Then, fly one for yourself and make up your own mind. Airfoil is same as a Cub. Like most aircraft, it's an acquired taste. For it's mission, it works fine.
    "Poor handling at Cub slow speeds" ?? That's funny. I did Dall sheep surveys in a Husky for nearly 15 seasons, and much preferred the Husky to a Cub in that environment. Nothing wrong with either airplane, but there is a LOT of knocking of Huskys out there, often by folks who've never flown one, but they HEARD that.....

    MTV
    Mike

    You may not remember me - we met in Montana in probably 2007 or so. My then girlfriend, now wife, Carol and I flew from NC in my then new to me red 2004 A1-B to a flyin at Winifred. We still have the same A1-B, and now have about 1100 hours flying it. Obviously I like it. Over the years I have flown a couple of friends' Super Cubs and enjoyed them, and now I also have a 1946 J3-C, which I am still getting used to after a couple of years of owning it. We have flown the Husky across the US a couple of times, all around the east and Midwest, and to AK and back on our honeymoon. I like it because it is a bit faster than a SC (not quite as slow of course, and it lands longer, as it is heavier). The constant speed prop and the 180 hp is useful. It is also IFR certified, which was a plus for my type of flying, and the heated pitot tube is fairly accurate at very slow speeds. The Husky has a very good service ceiling - probably higher than I will ever go... I can land the Husky in a little less than 400 feet in no wind conditions, which suits my needs just fine. It handles crosswinds very well. Uses less runway to take off than land, and the brakes actually work - unlike my experience with the Cubs that I have flown (including my J-3), although I don't use the brakes that much. The Husky took a bit of getting used to, but I am quite used to it now, and it is a really solidly built aircraft. I really like the feel of it (feels familiar, like a well-broken-in flight jacket). I have flown other Huskies of various ages, although not one of the "new wing" models. I have flown a lot of different aircraft in the 37 years that I have been flying, and they all have advantages and disadvantages. Piper Cubs - SC and other, have a classic mystique, which is kind of cool, and one of the reasons I bought the J3-C. Ladies and kids love those little yellow airplanes with the black lightning bolt!

    CM
    Last edited by Chris_McClure; 06-16-2020 at 09:15 PM.

  20. #100

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    Quote Originally Posted by CamTom12 View Post
    Interesting! What is that?
    The sign says it is a Fairchild Husky - looks interesting.

  21. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by CamTom12 View Post
    Interesting! What is that?
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris_McClure View Post
    The sign says it is a Fairchild Husky - looks interesting.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fairchild_F-11_Husky

    N1PA

  22. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by redfin View Post
    Iíve heard that a Husky uses 6 bungees, as opposed to a Cub using 4 bungees $? ? ?
    Would that really be a reason to choose a Cub over Husky?

    This clears something up for me: after installing cub style gear on my RANS S-7S some years ago, I at first used 1380 bungees (in addition to the Fox air shocks). Eventually, I grudgingly realized I needed to go to 1380 HD bungees. Grudgingly, as I couldn't believe my 780 pound plane needed the HD version.....but I also didn't realized that SC's use FOUR bungees, I only use two, I feel better now. I will also feel better the next time I curse while getting just two of them installed.

  23. #103

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    My dad is just finishing a CarbonCub EX. I fly for a living. I want to get an airplane that I can go into the back country with him. Having a hard time knowing which way to go. Sounds like CC's, SC's and Huskies all have their good points. I live within a couple hour drive of Afton, plus for the Husky. Enjoying the thread. In doing the research, seems like the new wing in 2005 and the upgrades in 2007 are kind of the sweet spot for the guy that doesn't want to spend a serious amount of money buying but also doesn't want to spend to little. Anyone have a recommendations on where the sweet spot is year wise?
    Thanks Bowie thanked for this post

  24. #104
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    There really is no “sweet spot” for the Huskys. The old wing airplanes are very good as well as the new wing airplanes. Actually there are a few that prefer the old wing, I am not one of them, I have owned both but I sure would wouldn’t not look at one if I was searching to buy. The old wing airplanes are priced less so there is a plus. I have owned Super Cub, Citabria, Arctic Tern and dad had a Scout. I have also owned 2 Husky’s and have one now. For me and the type of flying I do I prefer the Husky and would also prefer it if I moved back to Alaska.

    Like you said, all have their plusses and minus’s. I personally think the Husky would be my first choice for your type of flying but if a good Super Cub or Scout came along priced right I would give that strong consideration. Keep in mind, the short take off and landing is only part of the mission. A proficient pilot in any of the mentioned airplanes along with good judgement will be the most important to back country success.

    Since you live close to Aviat give Earl Polenz or Steve Anderson a call at Aviat and go fly a Husky, I think you will da joy it as well as learn a lot. Good luck!

    Kurt
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  25. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by redfin View Post
    Iíve heard that a Husky uses 6 bungees, as opposed to a Cub using 4 bungees $? ? ?
    Would that really be a reason to choose a Cub over Husky?

    No, there are other reasons to choose a Cub over a Husky but that is not one of them. There are also reasons to choose a Husky over a Cub too.

    Kurt

  26. #106

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    Kurt,
    Thanks a ton for your perspective, it was exactly what I was looking for!!

  27. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skyflier View Post
    Kurt,
    Thanks a ton for your perspective, it was exactly what I was looking for!!
    You bet! PM me if you want to talk further on the phone. Kurt

  28. #108
    C-GZUP Jorfarms's Avatar
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    Iíve also have a A1 Husky that I fly on 31 ABW and skis in the winter, along with an experimental cub on amphibs.Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by Jorfarms; 06-27-2020 at 02:01 PM.
    The bad news is time flies. The good news is that your the pilot.

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