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Thread: How many Husky Drivers?

  1. #81

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    Quote Originally Posted by mvivion View Post
    Two to three hours to install amphibs sounds pretty light, even on a second or third install.....but,

    I ran Huskys that went from wheels to floats and back seasonally. Change never took over 3 hours or so. These were straight floats.

    Yes, bungees are a bit of a pain, but as John says, the new bungee material won't hold up for 20 years like the old gear bungees used to do. So, it's not a bad idea to have new bungees every year in any case, and they're not obscenely expensive.

    The new Huskys have a different gear, with shock struts internally in place of the bungees. Never saw one apart, so not sure how that works, but I'm betting it'll make gear changes a piece of cake.

    MTV
    Mike,
    Think the bungees are still there with the shocks, believe they just dampen the bounce?
    John

  2. #82

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    Quote Originally Posted by mvivion View Post
    Two to three hours to install amphibs sounds pretty light, even on a second or third install.....but,

    I ran Huskys that went from wheels to floats and back seasonally. Change never took over 3 hours or so. These were straight floats.

    Yes, bungees are a bit of a pain, but as John says, the new bungee material won't hold up for 20 years like the old gear bungees used to do. So, it's not a bad idea to have new bungees every year in any case, and they're not obscenely expensive.

    The new Huskys have a different gear, with shock struts internally in place of the bungees. Never saw one apart, so not sure how that works, but I'm betting it'll make gear changes a piece of cake.

    MTV
    Since you are familiar with straight floats, labor time and parts, what would be the difference Husky vs Cub
    going from wheels to floats and back again?

  3. #83
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    6 1380 bungee cords on a Husky, they are a bitch in my opinion. Had to beef up my tool to stretch them. $32.75 x 6 for 1380 and if you want 1380HDs they are $81.75 each.

    Installing Cub gear on a Husky is a lot of work with lots of welding, sleeving the tubes all the way up to the panel.
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    Steve Pierce

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  4. #84
    mvivion's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MoJo View Post
    Since you are familiar with straight floats, labor time and parts, what would be the difference Husky vs Cub
    going from wheels to floats and back again?
    Maybe an hour or a bit more.

    MTV

  5. #85
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    I had a couple of Huskys. They were useful...lot of bang for the buck. Very fast, 50 gallons fuel, relatively new airframes (vs. 1946 PA-12) No wing strut issues, tail didn't shake. Good muffler system. Downside... flew a bit strange compared to a PA-18, slightly hard to get in and out of compared to a PA18, maintenance issues with MT props (got a Hartzell CF, end of troubles). expensive parts, trim system springs and cogs wear out. tail wire upgrades become more and more necessary, after wire broke in flight. Cheaper than outfitting a PA-18 with the same goodies, but never ever going to be a Super Cub, and they look chubby. Oh yeah, they have cooling issues even in no work environment. tight cowls. Still pretty good machine, and lower cost ot buy an older one. Last of all - they'll scalp you.

  6. #86
    mvivion's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by john schwamm View Post
    Mike,
    Think the bungees are still there with the shocks, believe they just dampen the bounce?
    John
    John,

    That May be. Never seen them open, just pics.

    MTV

  7. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvivion View Post
    John,

    That May be. Never seen them open, just pics.

    MTV
    Yep, bungees still there with the new “shock” gear.

  8. #88
    Bill.Brine's Avatar
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    Unlike a Cub every Husky has a five point harness attached directly to the airframe. Not just weld on tabs, bolted to the seat base or who knows what was cobbled together in 1977 with a well intentioned owner manufactured part, but a harness that is attached directly to the tubular airframe structure.
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  9. #89

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill.Brine View Post
    Unlike a Cub every Husky has a five point harness attached directly to the airframe. Not just weld on tabs, bolted to the seat base or who knows what was cobbled together in 1977 with a well intentioned owner manufactured part, but a harness that is attached directly to the tubular airframe structure.
    I have seen a simple fix for that. Seatbelts attached to vinyl coated cable rapped around the frame.

  10. #90

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    Quote Originally Posted by WhiskeyMike View Post
    I had a couple of Huskys. They were useful...lot of bang for the buck. Very fast, 50 gallons fuel, relatively new airframes (vs. 1946 PA-12) No wing strut issues, tail didn't shake. Good muffler system. Downside... flew a bit strange compared to a PA-18, slightly hard to get in and out of compared to a PA18, maintenance issues with MT props (got a Hartzell CF, end of troubles). expensive parts, trim system springs and cogs wear out. tail wire upgrades become more and more necessary, after wire broke in flight. Cheaper than outfitting a PA-18 with the same goodies, but never ever going to be a Super Cub, and they look chubby. Oh yeah, they have cooling issues even in no work environment. tight cowls. Still pretty good machine, and lower cost ot buy an older one. Last of all - they'll scalp you.
    . But still.. there I was two days ago, 92 mph and cruising along at 60 mph ground speed.

  11. #91
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    Seat base is part of the airframe.
    New pilots seat folds forward.
    This airframe was on its back.



    Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org mobile app

  12. #92
    Flyingde's Avatar
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    Do you have any idea what that fuselage weighed?? I have asked that question for years as a comparison to a cub and have never gotten an answer.

  13. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyingde View Post
    Do you have any idea what that fuselage weighed?? I have asked that question for years as a comparison to a cub and have never gotten an answer.
    No idea.

    My guess is a ~20-30 lbs more. Lots more structure, tabs and just more to it.

    Listening to the folks in Afton I get the feeling they err toward durability and safty over weight savings.
    That plus gizmos, CS prop, Oregon aero cushions, 50 gallon tanks result in 1,300 lbs planes.


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  14. #94
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill.Brine View Post
    Unlike a Cub every Husky has a five point harness attached directly to the airframe. Not just weld on tabs, bolted to the seat base or who knows what was cobbled together in 1977 with a well intentioned owner manufactured part, but a harness that is attached directly to the tubular airframe structure.
    Most Super Cubs that have been rebuilt in the last 20 years have Atlee Dodge STC'd seat belts to the floor. Several threads here on SuperCub.org on that modification.
    Steve Pierce

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  15. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Pierce View Post
    Most Super Cubs that have been rebuilt in the last 20 years have Atlee Dodge STC'd seat belts to the floor. Several threads here on SuperCub.org on that modification.
    This mod was a must for my Cub rebuild thanks to the folks here at SC.org making me aware of it. It requires a bit of justification since my airplane was born a J3 (the STC covers the PA-11 and PA-1 but was converted to a PA-11 configuration. The PA-18 has much better structure for shoulder harnesses, though. But, just about anything is better than nothing in terms of shoulder harnesses in an old airplane.

    I recall there was some report on shoulder harnesses in the PA-18 that showed they actually made the airplane itself fare better in a crash because of the way the compressive forced worked. I’ve never seen it but maybe someone knows of it?

    There is no doubt that a Part 23 airframe is built solidly, and that carries a weight penalty. It’s not necessarily a bad thing, though in Aviat’s case the lack of adjustable seat until 2018 certainly was a mistake that cost some sales. I was flying a 2017 Husky and I was given carpet samples to stack to get the right spot in addition to a cushion. I am glad to see the new seat for the shorties like me as it adds flexibility and comfort to the modern safety standards.

    —Amy
    Proud owner of a collection of airplane pieces (sometimes in one big piece) known as the Oklahoma Kid.

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