Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 40 of 50

Thread: Buying an airplane

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Posts
    14
    Post Thanks / Like

    Buying an airplane

    Hi All-
    I am 250hr vrf pilot that wants to get back into flying at age 50. I just got medical and weather permitting, I will get my BRF. I have never owned a plane and have been mortally terrified of ownership for years. I have a huge phobia of "Yeah, that is gonna be $10,000 to fix that." It may sound crazy, but it has always been the case. I have always been extremely annoyed at the fact of having to pay someone (an A&P Mechanic) to fix something I know with a service manual I could easily do myself.- Perhaps I need to check my attitude on that one, and for sure there is place for the professionals.
    Anyway, I find myself at an age and time where I better do it now if I am going to do it. I would like to have a STOL A/C and even more, one on floats. I think that would be fantastic.


    The reason for this post is to find what considerations I should take when choosing a plane. My Daughter and I visited Cub Crafters. They had to drag me out of there and surely had to mop my Saliva off the floor.
    However, unlike you all, I just can't bust out $350k for a 2-place airplane. Alright.....I can't bust out $350k for any plane.


    The simple answer would be to find a low-time Certified Cub would it not? Preferably one already on floats? I have been looking into the homebuilt kits as well such as the Rans 21, Kitfox 7, and another ugly-ass Aluminum Aardvark. However, 1 is fast, but not very STOL, 1 is more STOL centric but small, and the other uses paper thin Aluminum that shimmers in the prop wash. All of those kits are 35k, and I would need to wait over a year just for it to show up. - I am not sure that is going to work for me.
    In regards to Cubs, I have about 15min TT in a J3 (someone took me around the pattern.) but I don't know what I should hunt down or if I should buy Certified, E-AB, or build one myself?

    In the mean time, I will test the waters by going to Idaho for Tail-wheel training and then hopefully go to alaska for my float rating.
    Thanks Doug Budd thanked for this post
    Likes TJAK liked this post

  2. #2
    gbflyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    PAGS
    Posts
    734
    Post Thanks / Like
    Welcome. Seems an amateur built rig is in your future.
    Likes JeffP liked this post

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Posts
    14
    Post Thanks / Like
    If so, which should I consider?
    Thanks.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    don
    Posts
    725
    Post Thanks / Like
    My Mechanic is building a Rans S-20. Looks good to me. S-7 looks good too. Murphy rebel is nice. Cubs are expensive. Cessna 140, Piper Tripacer is great.
    .

  5. #5
    Cub Builder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    North Central AR
    Posts
    668
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Flienlow View Post
    If so, which should I consider?
    Thanks.
    It all depends on your budget. Those planes listed above are good choices. You can buy a partially completed Cub or SuperCub Clone for pennies on the dollar. Same for those aircraft listed in Don D's post. If your mechanical abilities are such that you feel an A&P is a rip off, then finish building the plane yourself so you know what you've got. Lots of EAA chapters with tech counselors and other knowledgeable folks around that can advise when you are in over your head as well as some on here. Not all Cubs are expensive. There are lots of Wag Aero Cub projects out there that can be easily modified to be an inexpensive SuperCub Clone. That's what I did when I decided I wanted another Cub. Mine is every bit as much fun as a Cubcrafters Cub at 15% of the cost, plus working like a dog for about 18 months to complete the build.

    -Cub Builder

  6. #6

    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    607
    Post Thanks / Like
    If you don’t want to pay an A&P to fix it, get an Experimental Amateur Built. If you didn’t build it, you still need to pay an A&P to do the condition inspection, but you can do all other work without supervision.

    If you go certified, you can still work on it, just need to have supervision. Remember the A&P signs his name to it, so he needs to be compensated fairly!

    If you are looking at something that goes in the water be prepared for sticker shock once you start looking for insurance!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Likes Idleclamp liked this post

  7. #7

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Cheyenne, WY
    Posts
    5
    Post Thanks / Like
    Have you checked out float plane ratings in Kalispell, MT? www.backcountryflyingexperience.com does them in a PA-18 Supercub.

  8. #8
    Bearhawk Builder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    In the woods
    Posts
    678
    Post Thanks / Like
    Experimental seems to fit you well. Build a SuperCub from Javron or a Bearhawk Patrol. Do all your own maintenance and set it up the way you want. Ownership cost of experimental is much less

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Down low in the hills of Vermont USA
    Posts
    1,235
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Flienlow View Post
    If so, which should I consider?
    Thanks.
    That is a tough one for us to answer, there are quite a few great choices, good ones too, and yes that Aardvark that needs no mention.
    Reason we can not answer,
    Your desires as to weather a side by side, or tandem seating.
    Conventional Lycoming or Continental, or something like a Rotax or Yamaha. Each one of those has it's strong as well as maybe not so strong points.
    Floats can go on most anything, just how important are they?

    But for me, I have no interest in a certified plane even though I am an A&P. There is so much that can be safely done to improve the 50 to 80YO designs that is efficiently done with an E-AB plane but the certified ones require an unknown amount of paperwork time depending on who oversees the project.
    Now if you live near one of the gurus here who can guide you through, cool.
    The choice of a mechanic can be more important than the choice of plane.

    I would consider getting out to Airventure later this year, that place is like a collage course of what is available.
    There is allot of fun to be had out there, Oshkosh as well as just to get back in the air with a plane that has fewer restrictions to where you can play.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Posts
    14
    Post Thanks / Like
    side by side, or tandem seating. Open to both. I do plan to do some cub driving in AK to get more time in. To be honest, after the CC tour. I am pretty hooked on a Cub.
    Conventional Lycoming or Continental - from a non A&P, personally the more simple the better for me.
    Floats can go on most anything, just how important are they? - Right now, less important. But I would want a plane that I can convert to float ops. It would be cool to have one on our dock.

    Likes JeffP liked this post

  11. #11

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    6,952
    Post Thanks / Like
    Just to build time and enjoy life? A J-3 with C-85-12, so you have a starter option, assuming you are approaching the age of semi-limited agility.

    But good J-3s are expensive, so if your budget is restricted, a good Champ or Citabria is an economical answer.

    I have my Decathlon insured for just under a grand, 52K hull. My buddy has his amphib super cub insured for 100K hull - premium is $5,000 per year! That buys a lot of instructional hours at Kalispell.

  12. #12

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    6,952
    Post Thanks / Like
    Come to think of it, say the Kalispell Cub is $250/hour. If you do that, you get 20 hours a year of quality instruction and practice - almost an hour every other week! And that does not count what you save on maintenance and mooring. I bet you would break even at one hour a week - more than most folks fly total.

    You could spend the other six days wearing out your J-3 in the pattern.

  13. #13

    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    41
    Post Thanks / Like
    You do not appear to be turned off by the weight limitations of LSA type planes (S-7 etc.) so used planes in that category should also be on your list. Take a look at Barnstormers section on LSA. There will be S-LSA and E-LSA. Make note that any S-LSA can be reclassified to an E-LSA; mostly a paperwork transition. There is also the advantage (maybe only mentally) that an S-LSA was factory built and not built by someone that you may not want to trust as far as his building skills as would be the case when going used E-AB. Once E-LSA, you can do your own maintenance and you can take a weekend course and get a certificate to do your own annual. IMO you should be a pretty darn good mechanic first as the course is mostly a list of where to find help and how to fill out the paperwork; it most certainly can't turn you into an A&P in a weekend. If you go LSA most likely it will have a Rotax. They are a good engine if you have the knowledge and, again IMO, the training. There is a also a two day course on annual inspection on the Rotax. I took mine in Tucson and it was excellent. If you want to dig in deeper, there are other courses that get more mechanically detailed. So there are more options than just E-AB out there if you want to check out that route.

  14. #14

    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Posts
    14
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by WYflyer View Post
    You do not appear to be turned off by the weight limitations of LSA type planes (S-7 etc.) so used planes in that category should also be on your list. Take a look at Barnstormers section on LSA. There will be S-LSA and E-LSA. Make note that any S-LSA can be reclassified to an E-LSA; mostly a paperwork transition. There is also the advantage (maybe only mentally) that an S-LSA was factory built and not built by someone that you may not want to trust as far as his building skills as would be the case when going used E-AB. Once E-LSA, you can do your own maintenance and you can take a weekend course and get a certificate to do your own annual. IMO you should be a pretty darn good mechanic first as the course is mostly a list of where to find help and how to fill out the paperwork; it most certainly can't turn you into an A&P in a weekend. If you go LSA most likely it will have a Rotax. They are a good engine if you have the knowledge and, again IMO, the training. There is a also a two day course on annual inspection on the Rotax. I took mine in Tucson and it was excellent. If you want to dig in deeper, there are other courses that get more mechanically detailed. So there are more options than just E-AB out there if you want to check out that route.
    Oh You might be suprised.
    I would prefer to have a "real plane."
    I would also prefer not having to build it, although think it would be very fun. - Just too time consuming.
    I am still a bit fuzzy on what I can and can't do as far as working on an Experimental aircraft myself. You can only get a repairman certificate for E-LSA, but not E-AB (assuming I bought someone's E-AB cub?)


    On that note, what are the big maintenance items and consideration with a Super Cub?

    PS. thanks all for taking the time here.

  15. #15
    CamTom12's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    741
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Flienlow View Post
    I am still a bit fuzzy on what I can and can't do as far as working on an Experimental aircraft myself. You can only get a repairman certificate for E-LSA, but not E-AB (assuming I bought someone's E-AB cub?)
    I bought an already-flying E-AB airplane. I do all my own maintenance. I also do an annual pre-inspection for my condition inspection and fix any squawks I find before I take it in for the for-real CI.

    I have a good friend that’s an A&P/IA that does the actual condition inspection and sign-off every year, and it’s great having an experienced set of eyes checking my work.

    I have found owning an E-AB to be extremely rewarding and affordable, even if I don’t have a repairman certificate.
    Likes hotrod180 liked this post

  16. #16

    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    607
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Flienlow View Post
    Oh You might be suprised.
    I would prefer to have a "real plane."
    I would also prefer not having to build it, although think it would be very fun. - Just too time consuming.
    I am still a bit fuzzy on what I can and can't do as far as working on an Experimental aircraft myself. You can only get a repairman certificate for E-LSA, but not E-AB (assuming I bought someone's E-AB cub?)


    On that note, what are the big maintenance items and consideration with a Super Cub?

    PS. thanks all for taking the time here.
    Read 14CFR 43.1. For any Experimental airplane (except one that previously had a Standard or restricted certificate), Part 43 does not apply, so you can do ANYTHING to it unless it qualifies as a major change under 21.93 (should say that in the operating limitations). The only thing you need a certificate for is the condition inspection.

    If you are going to own an airplane, any airplane, suggest you read and understand Part 43, and Part 91 sub part C and sub part E. The answers are in the regulations!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  17. #17
    behindpropellers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    6,771
    Post Thanks / Like
    Sounds like you want to fly...like tomorrow.

    You didn't say what your budget is.

    To me, it seems like the rans and other STOL home built airplanes cost around the same once completed....around 100K+++.

    Insurance: I'm not sure what the difference between an experimental vs certified rates are. You might end up giving your a&p labor savings to the insurance company.

    Floats: Floats are a great idea, but the insurance and where your airplane is based will determine if they are worth the money.

    I have my A&P rating. More than happy to help the people who are patient, interested in doing things correctly, and willing to ask for help if they are not 100% sure.

    Tim

  18. #18

    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Posts
    14
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by behindpropellers View Post
    Sounds like you want to fly...like tomorrow.

    You didn't say what your budget is.

    To me, it seems like the rans and other STOL home built airplanes cost around the same once completed....around 100K+++.

    Insurance: I'm not sure what the difference between an experimental vs certified rates are. You might end up giving your a&p labor savings to the insurance company.

    Floats: Floats are a great idea, but the insurance and where your airplane is based will determine if they are worth the money.

    I have my A&P rating. More than happy to help the people who are patient, interested in doing things correctly, and willing to ask for help if they are not 100% sure.

    Tim
    You know, I don't what the budget should be. I know for sure I won't get $200k past the Air Boss....ah hell nah. She is already giving me the stink eye on the whole idea.
    Looking at the Home Builts and talking to the Kitfox guys, I will be busting $125k easily for what I would want and that is without floats.
    This is where my old ass gets crazy. I remember when you could build a kit for a somewhat reasonable price, and back then they made more sense. Seems like I could buy Certified for maybe less and not have to wait till I am dead to get it in the air?? Of course like I stated earlier knowing my luck I will be all clutch butt and grab ass showing off my new-top-me plane when one of you guys will say. "You know..... that thing needs to be recovered" or some other spear through my soul that I am not aware of.

  19. #19

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    331
    Post Thanks / Like
    So....is $125k your budget? That's an open inquiry but realistically, a budget is needed, then add 50% to it and you know how to look for the cost of your plane.

    FWIW, I'd look into Citabrias, PA-12's, Cessna 170's, etc. For me, my mechanical ability tends to top out at changing a truck tire , so I can't and never will speak to an experimental, owner-built, whatever. That being said, if one is not all thumbs, there's a fair amount of work that can be done on certified A/C by the owner and supervised by the A&P without sacrificing quality.

    Also FWIW and very much opinion, you can get the aircraft mentioned above for less than $125k.....and even more opinion, when you've put 250 - 400 hours into your Citabria, -12, 170 or ??? and you can consistently fly to the limits of the airplane, that's the time to look for an -18, a Husky, a CC, a rip-snorter 180, whatever.

    At 50, which is getting increasingly far in the background for me, I'd want to spend my time flying rather than building.
    Back In Alaska

  20. #20

    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Posts
    14
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by pa12drvr View Post
    So....is $125k your budget? That's an open inquiry but realistically, a budget is needed, then add 50% to it and you know how to look for the cost of your plane.

    FWIW, I'd look into Citabrias, PA-12's, Cessna 170's, etc. For me, my mechanical ability tends to top out at changing a truck tire , so I can't and never will speak to an experimental, owner-built, whatever. That being said, if one is not all thumbs, there's a fair amount of work that can be done on certified A/C by the owner and supervised by the A&P without sacrificing quality.

    Also FWIW and very much opinion, you can get the aircraft mentioned above for less than $125k.....and even more opinion, when you've put 250 - 400 hours into your Citabria, -12, 170 or ??? and you can consistently fly to the limits of the airplane, that's the time to look for an -18, a Husky, a CC, a rip-snorter 180, whatever.

    At 50, which is getting increasingly far in the background for me, I'd want to spend my time flying rather than building.

    Thank you. I have heard of Citabria, but know nothing about them, I will need to dig on that. There is an outfit here that does a beautiful job redoing 170s, 80, and 85. But they are out of this world expensive for me. I was quoted 500k for a 170.

  21. #21

    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    don
    Posts
    725
    Post Thanks / Like
    I thought you were tight on $$$. You can buy a dang nice plane with 125K.

  22. #22

    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    148
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Flienlow View Post
    Oh You might be suprised.
    I would prefer to have a "real plane."
    I would also prefer not having to build it, although think it would be very fun. - Just too time consuming.
    I am still a bit fuzzy on what I can and can't do as far as working on an Experimental aircraft myself. You can only get a repairman certificate for E-LSA, but not E-AB (assuming I bought someone's E-AB cub?)


    On that note, what are the big maintenance items and consideration with a Super Cub?

    PS. thanks all for taking the time here.
    What is a “real plane”?
    Likes 40m liked this post

  23. #23
    Charlie Longley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Arlington, WA
    Posts
    630
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Flienlow View Post
    Thank you. I have heard of Citabria, but know nothing about them, I will need to dig on that. There is an outfit here that does a beautiful job redoing 170s, 80, and 85. But they are out of this world expensive for me. I was quoted 500k for a 170.
    You in the NW? There’s a decent 140 for sale in Arlington. You could probably get it for mid to high teens.

  24. #24

    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Posts
    14
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by RoddyM View Post
    What is a “real plane”?
    one that hauls fat people.
    Likes RoddyM, phdigger123 liked this post

  25. #25

    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Posts
    14
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Longley View Post
    You in the NW? There’s a decent 140 for sale in Arlington. You could probably get it for mid to high teens.
    Yes, S-43. Thank you but 140s are a bit...small.

  26. #26
    CamTom12's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    741
    Post Thanks / Like
    A Pacer makes a great 2-place plus gear airplane for larger folks.

    Pretty affordable, too.
    Likes RVBottomly liked this post

  27. #27
    Charlie Longley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Arlington, WA
    Posts
    630
    Post Thanks / Like
    If I didn’t have an A&P/IA I would build one of these-
    http://cubcrafters.com/carboncub/ex

  28. #28

    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Posts
    14
    Post Thanks / Like
    $207,609
    DEPOSIT: $69,203.00

  29. #29
    RVBottomly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Asotin County Washington (KLWS)
    Posts
    720
    Post Thanks / Like
    Flienlow, about 2 years ago I was in your position, except I have 10 years on you. Right now I'm flying a rental Cessna, scratch building a Wag Aero 2+2, and keeping an eye out for a decent flying machine. I almost bought a fairly nice Pacer for 20k located just 60 miles north of me. But I was too busy and someone else got there first.

    Keep your options open. Building a kit will eat up that 125k pretty fast, but it will be fun. I think you can find very nice planes to suit your purpose in the sub 50k range if you keep your eyes open. I'm still looking at something in the mid-teens that seems to be a solid little thing, but I'm keeping quiet about it for now

    One thing to consider: buy an airworthy airplane for around 20k, fly it for a few hundred hours, and sell it if you want something else. Odds are you'd get what you paid for it, and if not, the risk is not very high. (You were already bracing yourself for 10k hits anyway, right?).

  30. #30
    Taledrger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    954
    Post Thanks / Like
    Building takes a high degree of dedication to get anything done. Unless your a "project guy" in the first place you will likely lose interest before it's done.
    You don't need to buy the "end all, be all" airplane right out of the gate. Buy the best airplane in the category of interest as cheap as possible. Learn about ownership and your mission, then sell it and move up.
    Bob D
    Likes CamTom12, hotrod180, skywagon8a liked this post

  31. #31
    aktango58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    18AA
    Posts
    9,207
    Post Thanks / Like
    Flying is not cheap. If you go into this with a cheap mindset, you will forever be dissatisfied.

    Lots of $30,000 planes that are excellent to fly. Champs are better short field than an ECA citabria, and more roomy then the J-3. Pacers are larger, but not as easy to land, and less stable and faster than the champ/j-3s.

    Every plane has it's weakness and is a compromise. there is a reason many folks own more than one plane.

    For all you are wanting to do, a couple things come to mind: If you want STOL that is easy. If you are headed off to gravel bars, beaches and off airport action you have lots to learn beyond just how to control the plane... and that costs money in repairs.

    If you are headed off airport, buy the less expensive plane, learn on it and reduce your risk of loss. When you get experience move up to nicer planes.

    If you just want to use the midfield grass and play, find a Bearhawk and be done with it. They come up for sale now and again, and are great planes that you can do most of the work on yourself.

    Just my opinion
    I don't know where you've been me lad, but I see you won first Prize!

  32. #32
    Cub junkie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    My Moms basement
    Posts
    2,084
    Post Thanks / Like
    Everybody loves new Corvettes but in reality the used Camry will do.
    Likes abrogado, Taledrger, skywagon8a liked this post

  33. #33
    hotrod180's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Port Townsend, WA
    Posts
    2,936
    Post Thanks / Like
    I believe that Harveys has a Champ on the rental line.
    You can do your BFR in that (BTW they call them flight reviews now), get up to speed on tailwheel flying, and get your sea legs back under you.
    Maybe then rent a Cessna or similar, & think about if you want side x side or tandem, tube & fabric or spam can, etc.
    If you decide to go ahead & buy something, I'd suggest starting small--
    I know plenty of people who own Luscombes, C140's, Champs, J3's, etc
    and get just as much or more fun out of flying them as people with bigger spendier airplanes.
    Plus
    it'd be a shame to spend a hundred grand on a bigger fancier airplane, then realize that you're really just not that into it.
    Cessna Skywagon-- accept no substitute!
    Likes CharlieN liked this post

  34. #34

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    6,952
    Post Thanks / Like
    Champs and Citabrias are probably best for dimensionally challenged people. And they are true aviation bargains.
    Likes Taledrger liked this post

  35. #35
    behindpropellers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    6,771
    Post Thanks / Like
    You know....

    You can buy TWO airplanes with $125K. One for you and one for your wife!
    Likes Taledrger liked this post

  36. #36
    txpacer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Iowa Park, TX
    Posts
    704
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by behindpropellers View Post
    You know....

    You can buy TWO airplanes with $125K. One for you and one for your wife!
    That can happen

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20200129_170021.jpeg 
Views:	87 
Size:	87.5 KB 
ID:	46716
    Likes Steve Pierce liked this post

  37. #37

    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    don
    Posts
    725
    Post Thanks / Like
    I have a cub clone and C-182 for Sunday go to meeting and have less than 80K invested.

  38. #38

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    6,952
    Post Thanks / Like
    I have a J3 and a Super Decathlon. Initial investment total $43,500. Both! But I cheated - bought the J3 in 1962.

  39. #39
    Taledrger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    954
    Post Thanks / Like
    Some 20 years go, I had the resources and the understanding wife, to get back into General Aviation after a 25 year absence. I owned 2 "work planes" back in the mid '70s (J-5 w/low volume spray system and a new Cessna Ag-Truck). Never owned a personal fun airplane..
    My first 10 years back, I bought and sold 7 airplanes, trying to find what tripped my trigger..(won't say I made money, but sold them all for more than I paid for them. That my friend is the key).
    After those 7, I went into a partnership with the biggest "dipsh*t" on the planet , (still my best friend and airplane partner today). He convinced me to sell my L21 SuperCub and buy a F'N HUSKY!! Two Huskies later (he wrecked the first one) we bought another L21 SuperCub..
    Ten years later we have upgraded as resources allowed. We have developed a relationship with local AP/IA folks that work with us on maintainence stuff and the resources on this Forum (Steve Pierce alone, has saved me a ton of cash) are invaluable.
    Aircraft ownership is a learning experience. It's prudent to reduce the learning costs to have the most resources to spend on "THE airplane".
    Go to your local airport, make friends, develop relationships, ask questions, ask for opinions (you don't need to except them, but be respectful), learn as much as you can... NEVER BUY AN AIRPLANE YOU CAN'T SELL FOR MORE THAN YOU PAID...!!!
    Bob D
    Thanks RVBottomly thanked for this post

  40. #40
    hotrod180's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Port Townsend, WA
    Posts
    2,936
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Taledrger View Post
    ….won't say I made money, but sold them all for more than I paid for them. That my friend is the key.....
    …..NEVER BUY AN AIRPLANE YOU CAN'T SELL FOR MORE THAN YOU PAID...!!!
    Good advice, but IMHO hard to actually follow.
    About the best I've ever done is break even.
    Cessna Skywagon-- accept no substitute!

Similar Threads

  1. Buying a Canadian airplane
    By CubDriver218 in forum Cafe Supercub
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 08-13-2016, 06:22 AM
  2. Sam's Airplane in transition to Dave's airplane....
    By Sam Beckett in forum Take Action Jackson
    Replies: 47
    Last Post: 05-03-2006, 09:49 PM
  3. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 09-09-2004, 03:47 PM

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •