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Thread: PA 18/95 short TO & L

  1. #1
    giangab's Avatar
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    PA 18/95 short TO & L

    Goodday Mates,
    Further to my restoration of my PA 18/95 C90 1000 Lb I wish to improve my skills for safe short take off andd landing. No flaps.
    IAS at stall with engine idle, sea level 27 deg C, 1/2 fuel (2 tanks) and 2 pers is just below 50 mph, say 45.
    Any suggestion or recommendation.
    Thanks for your contributions.
    Ciao, Gian


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  2. #2
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
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    Try several reduced power longer ground run takeoffs with the tail on the ground. If the airspeed pitot isn't bent and is as Piper intended with no tubing leaks, observe the AS when the plane lifts off. Duplicate that plus some reserve airspeed on future full power takeoffs and reduced power landings. It's as good as airspeed indication can be as an aid which isn't much.

    Gary
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  3. #3
    L18C-95's Avatar
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    Take off tail low and accelerate in ground effect to 65-70mph which is Vy. Am not sure Vx in the flapless 90HP SC (55mph) gives any better gradient.

    On landing it is all about using side slip, accurate speed in the side slip (50 mph IAS) and practising spot landings - many spot landings.


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    add vortex generators for more stable slow flight.

  5. #5

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    I think by definition Vx gives a better gradient than Vy. It is about 50% better in my Stroker J-3. Lifting off above liftoff speed may be good for jets, but it doesn't help with Cubs.

    Yes, I have heard about "zoom climbs" - but mathematically they don't work, because drag goes up as the square of airspeed.

  6. #6

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    Your stall speed is slower with power on. This will usually have the tailwheel a foot below the mains, and poor vis. The trick is to use the slip to help vis on approach, once into the flare wings level and release a bit of back pressure just before you think you will land. This should prevent a tail first landing ,takes practice to get it right. Tail high braking will give you good vis and traction, lift/hold the tail with the brakes.
    DENNY

  7. #7
    L18C-95's Avatar
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    The physics are relatively straightforward - at gross does the power available curve give that much excess power over the power required curve at Vx in the 90HP SC.

    The power required curve rises sharply on the back side of the drag curve, while conversely drops fast as you move to Vy.

    Introduction to Flight can supply the calculus of the drag curve between Vx and Vy.


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  8. #8
    behindpropellers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by giangab View Post
    Goodday Mates,
    Further to my restoration of my PA 18/95 C90 1000 Lb I wish to improve my skills for safe short take off andd landing. No flaps.
    IAS at stall with engine idle, sea level 27 deg C, 1/2 fuel (2 tanks) and 2 pers is just below 50 mph, say 45.
    Any suggestion or recommendation.
    Thanks for your contributions.
    Ciao, Gian


    Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org mobile app
    Instead of spending money on gadgets - learn how to fly the plane. Minimum of 15 takeoffs and landings per week for a couple of months.

  9. #9

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    The above is great advice. Learn to fly the airplane and look outside.
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  10. #10
    Gordon Misch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carey Gray View Post
    The above is great advice. Learn to fly the airplane and look outside.
    In my opinion, right on; especially in a Cub-type plane. Flying by "The numbers" is easy to quickly sense and adjust from the view out the window. Not like a heavy, slippery airplane in that regard.
    Last edited by Gordon Misch; 09-06-2019 at 12:44 AM.
    Gordon

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  11. #11
    giangab's Avatar
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    Thanks for the time being. Flying, Training and experience are no sobstitutes. Good advice and tricks will surely help, as a good instructor.
    My grass field is some 440 m long, well mainrained. Zero obstacles at 270 and trees and levve plus a wide river bed at 90. Some 50 ft say at 200 m. I will train on a 800 m grass field. So far I manage my field, but I need want to improve for safety and performance. Thanks again.


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