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Thread: Javron Cub Building for Dummies

  1. #41
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Whoever wrote up the website is not totally informed with information on the original Piper Super Cub. .035" wall engine mount tubes? There was another but I can't remember. I like to install the engine and route controls, hoses and wires like Piper did. Unhook the tach and swing the engine. Takes me a couple of minutes and then I can easily pull a mag off. See many Super Cub rebuilds where this consideration is not made and it makes maintaining more time consuming.
    Steve Pierce

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  2. #42
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RaisedByWolves View Post
    Steve. It’s a new airplane. You’ll never have to swing the engine. especially if it has slick mags.


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    I remember that well. Primer lines, oil pressure, engine controls, wiring. PITA
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    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers
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  3. #43
    RaisedByWolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Pierce View Post
    I remember that well. Primer lines, oil pressure, engine controls, wiring. PITA
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    At least it only had a hundred hours on it. I remember telling you man it will suck to swing the mount. Had the pleasure of working on mags on a husky. Now that’s fun.


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  4. #44
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    The Vetterman exhaust doesn't have the heat muff in back of the engine like the stock Cub so it really opens it up.
    Vans RV7 finished 2008
    Backcountry Super Cub finished 2011
    A&P Aircraft rebuilding, Building assistance
    1956 Supercub complete rebuild

  5. #45
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pittsdriver View Post
    The Vetterman exhaust doesn't have the heat muff in back of the engine like the stock Cub so it really opens it up.
    So does the Sutton. It isn't that hard to route things like Piper did so you can swing it to pull a mag. Pays dividends the first time you have to do it but I mainly work on certified stuff and prefer to do it like the manufacturer did. I figure they built like 10,000 of these things, they kinda figured out what they were doing. Every time I change or modify something I have to think 3 steps ahead and a lot of times it bites me in the ass anyway.
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers

  6. #46
    RaisedByWolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Pierce View Post
    So does the Sutton. It isn't that hard to route things like Piper did so you can swing it to pull a mag. Pays dividends the first time you have to do it but I mainly work on certified stuff and prefer to do it like the manufacturer did. I figure they built like 10,000 of these things, they kinda figured out what they were doing. Every time I change or modify something I have to think 3 steps ahead and a lot of times it bites me in the ass anyway.
    But it’s a new airplane. You won’t have to swing the engine


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  7. #47

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    Metal Headliner

    Metal Headliner

    Apologies in advance, this post is a little like War and Peace.

    I went with the metal headliner when I ordered my kit. This step was fairly intimidating to me since there were a lot of surfaces involved that all needed to work together. It all worked out in the end. But I will say that I would be much better at it a second time through!

    In the Javron kit, you will receive 7 pieces that make up the headliner: 1) a large piece that becomes the top/back, 2) two side pieces roughly cut for the D-windows, 3) two window channel pieces that will connect the sides to the D-windows; and 4) two top front pieces.
    The first thing I did was go to my local art supply store and buy some poster board to re-create the top/back piece. This is not a necessary step but it allowed me to mess around with things to get a sense of how everything would fit together. It made my subsequent conversation with Jay much more informative.

    In talking with Jay, we discussed the basic process as follows (I’ll go into more detail on each item):

    • Bend top/back piece
    • Match drill holes from top/back piece onto side pieces and cleco together
    • Insert D-window channel pieces into channels
    • Position “box” in fuselage and temporarily secure it
    • Mark, on side pieces, where holes in channel pieces hit (those holes you can access), and scribe channel piece edge onto side pieces
    • Remove everything
    • Drill holes that were marked above and, using scribe line, mark and drill remaining holes
    • Remove excess material on side panels so that D-window channels are flush
    • Dimple and flush rivet d-window channels to side pieces


    Here’s “the rest of the story”

    Bend top/back piece

    Here is a picture of the top view of the flat top/back piece. By the way, I know this is the top view because of the notches in the bottom corners which create a “tab”. That tab will be attached to the bottom of a horizontal member that supports the upper baggage shelf. The notches are different sizes because the tubing for the dogleg comes it at different angles – and the larger notch has to be on the right. Look at your fuselage and this should become clear.

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    From top to bottom of the picture: there are two “tabs” at the top which are intended to be bent back to give the front some stiffness. Jay mentioned to me that he believed the front was a little long on his CAD drawing for the standard width cub. I found this to be the case and bent them a little farther back…eventually.

    The hole is for the shoulder harness for the rear seat to pass through.

    Further down you will note that the sides flare out. The point at which the angles of the sides changes is where you will bend this piece to create a top and a back surface. I measured the angle of this bend, based on the side pieces, as 125* but don’t take my word for it!

    On the bottom of the piece, you will put in a couple of bends so that the very bottom tab essentially points straight back and attaches to the underside of a c-channel piece that supports the upper baggage compartment floor. I’ll refer to this part as the “tail” below.

    You will also need to put in a V-bend which starts at the center of the front piece and extends back to the sides at the point where the top bends to the back. This will help add stiffness to the top. It will also put a peak in the front which will maximize the head space for the rear seat passenger. Based on the front pieces that the top sits in, I estimated that the peak at the front would need to be about 10*. So each side of the “V” would be 5*. When bending later, I thought this looked like too little of a bend. So I bent it more…only to soften those bends later!

    Here is a picture of the underside with the top/back bend and “V” bends laid out.

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    I got access to a very nice bending brake and was able to make these bends. The only advice I can add is: 1) practice before you bend the good stuff, and 2) plan the bends in advance – seems like you want to go from the middle out (i.e. start with the top/back bend and work out from there). Also, you may want to delay on bending the front tabs up to confirm that the front of the top piece of the headliner terminates where you want it to.

    Match drill holes from top/back piece onto side pieces and cleco together

    The top/back piece is pre-drilled along the edges. Also, the side pieces came pre-bent along the top and back with little edges that overlap the top/back piece. I turned the top/back piece upside down and took one of the side pieces and matched it up to the top. I secured the two pieces with cleco clamps and match drilled the sides with the top with a 3/32nd bit. As I went along, I inserted clecos in the match drilled holes.

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    This was a somewhat tricky step because you have two odd-shaped pieces that don’t naturally sit in a state to facilitate the drilling. As such, its important to look at all sides continually to ensure the two pieces are mated properly. What may look fine from the inside may have actually migrated a bit when looking at it from the outside. At any rate, I repeated the process with the other side as well and soon had something resembling a headliner.

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    Insert D-window channel pieces into channels
    There are two pieces that go into the D-window channels. One already formed to the window is shown below. By making slight bends between each of the segments, they are easily formed into the shape of the window. Clothes pins are a great way to secure them. Now is a good time to make sure that the tabs which will rest against the side pieces are not bent too far inward.
    Also, keep in mind that the bottom front of each of the pieces will go under an interior panel piece on each side.

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    Position “box” in fuselage and temporarily secure it

    Now it’s time to put the big metal box inside the fuselage. Starting from the back, I slid the “tail” in between the top of the dogleg tubes. I then secured the top by tying a clothes pin with a string* to the top stringer and dropping it through the seatbelt hole in the top of the headliner then tightening it to where it was “about right”. (*In a pinch, I have heard that a daughter’s scrunchie can be used for this purpose.)

    Key learning for me: a number of times, you will need to get things to be “where they want to be”. I first learned this with fuel lines. We’re dealing with light materials and they can easily be “persuaded” to go just about anywhere we want to put them. But its much better to have a part that is in place in its natural state rather than under force to be there. This takes patience (for me!)

    Back to the headliner. It was helpful to me to visualize how the headliner is eventually secured. In the back, as previously mentioned, it is secured to the bottom of the c-channel the supports the upper baggage floor. On each side, it is secured to the D-windows but also secured to three tabs for interior panels (left side) and the channel above the large lower baggage door (right side). On the front, it is connected to the two overlapping front pieces. Those pieces, in turn, will be secured to the peaked channel that sits above the rear spar carry through. I used various clamps to temporarily secure the headliner at these different points.

    The other consideration is the fuel line from the rear of the right tank. It will bend around the metal headliner (if installed correctly!) but will be pretty close. Aside from that, once I got the headliner in, it didn’t come close to interfering with anything else. For instance, I wasn’t sure about the flap pulleys but they are not an issue.

    Once I had the “box” where I wanted it and temporarily secured, I drilled the holes in the “tail” and cleco’d it into position in the back. I also drilled the three holes on the left side where the headliner will be registered to the side tabs. Next, I marked where I needed to take a little off the right side so that it would rest in the channel above the lower baggage door.

    Finally, I marked six evenly spaced holes where the top piece meets the front pieces and drilled and cleco’d these.
    I removed the box for this and re-installed after taking some off the right side. It was now beginning to sit in place semi-permanently.

    Mark, on side pieces, where holes in channel pieces hit (those holes you can access), and scribe channel piece edge onto side pieces


    Now it was time to tackle the window channels. First, I made sure all the tabs on the window channel were sitting flush against the side piece of the headliner. Next, I drew a line to scribe exactly where the side channel piece hit the side of the metal headliner. Finally, for the tab holes that I could reach, I used a scratch awl to mark the position of the holes on the side pieces of the headliner.

    Remove everything. Drill holes that were marked above and, using scribe line, mark and drill remaining holes


    Then everything came out of the plane. (By the way, I put it in and took it out about 6-8 more times than I describe here). I center punched the holes I had marked, drilled them out with a #40 bit and inserted cleco’s. Then, by positioning the window channel piece using the reference line I drew, I was able to mark the position of the remaining holes and drilled, deburred, cleco’d these as well. Note: The top of the left piece should bend out slightly to match the window channel. Be sure to put a bend in the side piece before marking this hole.

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    Remove excess material on side panels so that D-window channels are flush


    Once all the holes were marked on the side piece, I removed the window channel piece and removed the excess aluminum material up to the scribe line. I did this with a few passes of the snips followed by lots of hand filing and sanding. Finally, I re-cleco’d the window channels on the side pieces to confirm that I didn’t have a “lip” and that the channel transitioned nicely to the side piece.

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    At this time, I also re-installed each of the side pieces (with the window channel cleco’d on) into the fuselage. One reason for doing this was to determine which of the side tabs needed to be cut down so that the now-static window channel piece could fit into the window channel. Once I cut down a few of the tabs, I found the easiest way to install them was to position the front of the bottom of the window piece in its place (next to the “nubs” for the cross tube) and then rock the piece back into place. I also, reinstalled the whole box at this time and marked, punched, drilled, deburred and cleco’d the tops of the front piece to the peaked channel above the rear spar carry through (those top holes are not shown in the picture below)

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    Dimple and flush rivet d-window channels to side pieces


    We’re almost there…Next, I dimpled the holes in both the side pieces and the window channel in anticipation of flush riveting. Due to the width of the channel piece, I could not use the rivet squeezer and borrowed a rivet gun to drive the flush rivets.

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    That’s about where I stand right now. I still need to install nutplates – I know that’s probably overkill but I don’t know enough to be 100% certain I won’t need to take this out again after I *think* its in for the last time. I will be covering this with fabric. Also, I need to work out the transition from the sides to the wing root panels and maybe put some nutplates there. Stay tuned…
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  8. #48

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    Excellent work!!! 1/3 or more of my flying involves stuffing the plane to the max with a lot of pointy and odd shaped stuff, having a metal headliner is well worth the effort if you plan on doing any kind of fun heavy/working flying with the plane. Now on soapbox. Everything in a cub should be made to install or remove with the fabric on!!!! This includes headliner/extended baggage/floor/pedals/brakes/dash/lights/cables/ect. Ya you can cut a hole and patch it then try to match 10 year old faded pant. Do it right the first time and any work after that will be simple.
    DENNY
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  9. #49
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    A friend brought his headliner over a few months ago and we had to call Jay to clarify where these bends went. Wasn't hard to do but cannot imagine having to figure all this stuff out without a manual. I have sent him numerous Piper drawings, service documents and the pictures from 5 Super Cub rebuilds. Kudos to all Javron builders to building something like this without a builders manual.
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers
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  10. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by DENNY View Post
    .....1/3 or more of my flying involves stuffing the plane to the max with a lot of pointy and odd shaped stuff.....
    DENNY
    First thing I thought of when you said pointy and odd
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    This is is more than likely what you were referring too...
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    I hope that if I put it on it’s nose the aluminum horse shoes and not the steel are what hits me in the head
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  11. #51

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    This is what happens when the 180 can't make it back to help fly out moose camp.
    DENNY
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  12. #52

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    False Boot and Boot Cowl

    False Boot

    I opted for the false boot for my project. These pieces are depicted in Piper drawing 12818 and are referred to as Panel – Fuselage Trim. The panels from Javron aren’t exactly the same dimensions as the drawing. I had a choice and understand that it’s a popular option to just extend the fabric to the boot cowl. (If you go that route, I believe you need to fabricate aluminum panels so that the fabric holds its shape around the lower edges.)

    First, I drilled holes in both piper channels. I covered the channels with masking tape first so I could more easily mark where holes go. I could also just pull off the tape and start over if I was unhappy with where the holes were ending up. Bill Rusk’s thread suggests starting about an inch down and placing the holes every three inches. This is pretty much what I followed.

    Next, I made a copy of a panel on poster board. The panels have dogleg in them and playing with the poster board made it clearer how they would bend under the fuselage (I had it backwards originally). Later, the poster board template would also be very helpful when I overcut one of the panels and needed to make a new one.
    I also put a couple of layers of masking tape on the rear piper channel to simulate fabric.
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    Once I got the general idea with the poster board, I moved on to the aluminum panels. I’m not sure this is necessary, but I also identified where the angle occurred on the panels to make sure it was lined up with where the panel needed to bend.

    First, I centered the top of the piece on the piper channels and clamped it in place. Then, I continued down, clamping and making sure to center piece on piper channel. Once I was comfortable it was in the right spot, I back-drilled the top two holes and cleco’d the panel in place.

    I continued down the piece, drilling and cleco-ing until I got to where the bend needed to start. I marked on the piece (both front and rear) where the bend needed to occur. Also, note that the bend is sharper on the rear part of the bend than on the front part of the bend as the fuselage begins to transition to the more rounded shape of the firewall.

    I then removed the panel from fuselage and placed it over a pipe. I purchased a length of pipe for just this purpose and discovered that pipe sizes are inside diameter not outside diameter! In the end, a ½” pipe has a ¾” outside diameter which worked nicely for this purpose. I carefully bent the piece – tighter on the read part and looser on the front part of the bend.

    After bending, I placed the piece back on the fuselage and continued the clamp-drill-cleco process on the bottom of the fuselage. Once complete, I repeated the process for the other side. I was pretty darned overjoyed when the two pieces met almost perfectly on the bottom! Finally, I removed the false boot pieces for now.

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    Assemble boot cowl
    The boot cowl comes in two pieces. I’ve seen the discussions here on three-piece boot cowls. While it would be nice to have a stationary piece under the windshield and removable sides, I stuck with the basic design.

    The firewall came with a plastic wrap that left a residue when removed. I found WD-40 did the best to help remove the residue.
    I followed the guidance in the Backcountry supercub youtube video for assembling the pieces with clecos. It’s pretty straight forward. Just keep in mind that, toward the bottom of the boot cowl, the firewall transitions from being “inside” the cowl edge to being “outside” the edge. This is also explained in the video. Additionally, you can look at Piper drawing 12381 (Cowl Assembly – Fuselage).

    There are also two sets of stiffeners for the top and bottom of the boot cowl (10795 and 11408-27). While the boot cowl is pre-drilled for these, the stiffeners themselves need to be match drilled. But, you will need a way to make sure the stiffeners are aligned with the holes. To do this, I drew a line on the inside of the boot cowl along the row of holes and extended it beyond the holes. On the stiffeners, I found the centerline of the edge that will be flush against the holes and drew a line along the length of the stiffener on this centerline. Then it was a simple matter to match up the lines and clamp the stiffener in place, drilling and adding clecos. Also, the bottom stiffeners can potentially interfere with piper channel or the false boot pieces (if you are using those). Piper drawing 12381 shows that the lower stiffeners are set back 1 ¼” from the edge of the lower cowl.
    Finally, I cleco’d the six instrument panel clips (22471) in place.

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    Once the stiffeners and panel clips were in place, it was time to do some riveting. The instrument panel clips could be riveted in with my rivet squeezer (mine has a 3” yoke). I used dome headed (AN470A4-4) rivets for these. The stiffeners, however, weren’t near an edge. So I borrowed my friend’s rivet gun and installed the smaller dome rivets for these holes (AN470A3-3). I did have a concern about using domed rivets for the top stiffeners because I was worried that they would interfere with the window trim strips. But I understand from Jay that the trim strip will go between the rivets.
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    I didn’t do any more riveting of the boot cowl (i.e. attached the two sides or the firewall). I will eventually be making a blank of the firewall out of aluminum to use when locating all the engine stuff and I don’t want to mess up my good stuff with misplaced holes.

    Fitting Instrument Panel
    Before putting the boot cowl on the plane, I needed to drill the 6 edge holes for the instrument panel. In the interest of full disclosure, I did this two times! The first time I “missed” on the first two holes and had to begin again. While my first try was probably workable, it was a spot I was going to be looking at every time I flew.

    First, using the calipers, I scribed a line 7/16” from the top edge of the panel. This is a good reference line to make sure that your scribed holes are in the right spot. For me, the tops of the traced holes just touch the scribed line. This step would have saved me from ruin on my first attempt. In the following picture, you should be able to make out the scribed line and the traced holes (as well as the drilled hole).

    Next, find centerline of instrument panel. I did this a couple of ways. First, I used a fabric tape measure to find the halfway point over the rounded top of the instrument panel. I backed up this measurement by finding the center point between the two straight edges at the bottom of the panel and then confirmed this was in line with the top halfway point. I then marked two points on the top of the panel that were 2” off the center line.

    On the top of the boot cowl, I measured the “gap” where the v-brace will slide into. Subtracting half that measurement from 2”, I measured out from the edge of the gap by the difference and made a mark on either side. Now I had two marks each 2” from the “centerline” of the boot cowl.

    Next, I placed the instrument panel on the boot cowl and lined up the 2” marks on both. This is where it gets a bit tricky because the boot cowl is pretty “loosey goosey” as Sammy Sosa would say (that is to say, it doesn’t stay still!). Once in the proper place, I used two cleco clamps to hold the panel in place and rechecked everything.

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    Then I took a sharpie and carefully traced the holes of the instrument panel clips onto the back of the instrument panel.

    I then removed the instrument panel from the boot cowl and examined my newly drawn “holes” on the back of the panel. As noted above, the tops of these drawn holes just touched the edge of the 7/16” scribe line. I also noted that they were the same distance from the center line. I held my breath and center-punched these holes and drilled them up to a #19 bit (for the #8 panel screws).

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    After deburring the holes, I placed the instrument panel back on the boot cowl and attached it by my new two screw holes. The instrument panel clips have a wide channel for the screw to fit in – so it’s important to go through the process of matching all your alignment marks noted above. Then I marked the next two holes out. Removed the panel, marked and drilled the holes. And repeated the process one more time for the last set of holes.

    At this point, I removed the instrument panel from the boot cowl and turned to fitting the boot cowl on the fuselage.

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    Fitting boot cowl to fuselage


    The first thing I did was purchase four bolts, washers and nuts at the hardware store to stand in for the good AN hardware. Next, I filed the powder coating out of the engine mount bolt locations in the fuselage. Once the hardware fit in smoothly, I placed the boot cowl on the fuselage and secured it with the temporary hardware. (The backcountry supercub video suggests covering the v-brace with tape to protect it. And this isn’t a bad idea.)

    Next, I attached the instrument panel to the boot cowl. The lower part of the instrument panel rested against the diagonal fuselage tubes. So, I noted the portion of the panel that needed to be filed down, removed it, filed down the sides and re-installed (actually I did this a few times! Those instrument panel screws are kind of a bear to get on).
    Once the instrument panel was on, and the boot cowl “looked about right” for now, I reinstalled the false boot pieces by sliding them under the boot cowl and cleco’d them into place on the rear channel only (i.e. the channel that is not shared with the boot cowl).

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    I attached a ratchet strap to one of the windshield/wing root loops, ran it under the belly of the boot cowl and up to the loop on the other side as shown below:

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    Before back-drilling the boot cowl, you may also want to take a straight edge and confirm that the firewall is straight. (The boot cowl is still a little “swimmy” at this point.)

    Starting from the top of the piper channel, I back-drilled through the boot cowl while an assistant (random family member) held a block of wood against the boot cowl. I alternated sides and cleco’d as I went.

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    And this is about where I stand right now. I still need to back drill the two fuselage tab holes into the instrument panel. Also, while the Piper drawings don’t appear to call for it, I understand that folks will rivet the boot cowl halves on the bottom. I still need to do this.

    I hope this helps someone coming after me!

  13. #53

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    You may run into an issue with the holes lining up on the ginger bread once you hang a motor on the fuselage. The frame will flex a bit so you might want to try the fit with a motor/weight on the front before you paint the boot cowl. Also don't forget the angles and reinforcement doublers for the cowl rails.
    DENNY
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  14. #54
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Excellent stuff!!! Thank you for posting that Sam.

    Bill
    Very Blessed. "It's not an obsession, it's a passion"

  15. #55

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Rusk View Post
    Excellent stuff!!! Thank you for posting that Sam.

    Bill
    Thanks Bill. Just trying to return the favor of all your (and others’) good info on here.
    Last edited by Sam D; 12-14-2019 at 03:28 PM.
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  16. #56

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    Wingtip light bases

    It's been a while since I posted. I'd like to blame it on the pandemic, but that doesn't really cover the period from December to March! I've slowly been working on little projects and will get updates posted here. In reading through this thread, I was reminded that there is a lot of helpful advice from folks. So, I need to pay back with some updates.

    This was a smaller project and is still in process. With my kit, I purchased Aveo Engineering Powerburst Daylight Nav/Position wing tip lights. These lights are shown below and include the rear facing white light that normally goes on the tail. Accordingly, they need to be visible in front and in the rear of the aircraft. I have the rounded wing tips. So, these lights need to go on the apex of the wingtip (versus toward the front for standard cubs without the need for rear facing lights).

    To find the apex of the wingtip, I made sure the wings were level (they are leading edge – down on a simple wing rack) then using a large socket on a string (who needs a proper plumb bob?), I identified the outermost edge of the bow in each of the wingtips.

    For a base for these lights, I purchased a length of oak cut two pieces about the size of the lights.

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    Now, the challenging (fun) part – how to create a channel in the wood so that it would sit on the rounded and circular wingtip? To match the rounded edge of the wingtip, I eventually settled on a 1” router bit.
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    This matched the rounded edge of the wing tip nicely. However, the base would not sit squarely on the wingtip because of the bow in the wood. How do you match that?

    Luckily, I find myself unencumbered by experience (or, arguably, intelligence). This allows such harebrained ideas as…the swinging router. I used a couple of coat hangar wire to hold the router to the swinging arm and set the swing radius equal to the radius of the wing tip bow (and rechecked with a simple pencil in a string).
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    Believe it or not, this worked just about perfectly. After routing out the channel, I shaped the sides of the bases to more closely match the light footprint. I then sanded the sides to the shape of the light.
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    Next steps for me will be to epoxy the bases on to the wing tip bows (I may send them down a bit so that they are a bit closer to the wingtip bow), drill holes for the wiring bundle and pilot holes for the fasteners, and wire the lights in the wing.

    Hope this helps someone.
    Thanks Dave Barras, stknrddr thanked for this post

  17. #57

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    Nutplates and Piper channel

    Nutplates and Piper channel

    As Bill Rusk pointed out, getting nutplates in the Piper channel can be a challenge. Here is one method that is working out pretty well for me that doesn’t involve riveting. It involves 3M 08115 Panel Adhesive which is a two-part adhesive used for auto panels.

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    According to the manufacturer info, it has a 30-minute working time (which is about right – it gets thick and difficult to work with eventually), a 4-hour set time and a 24-hour cure time. Here’s how my process worked:

    Cut approx. 1” segments of 6-32 allthread and screw into nutplates

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    Add adhesive to ears of both sides of nutplate. Be careful not to get the adhesive near the threaded portion of the nutplate.

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    Insert nutplate into hole and hold in position with nut.

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    Some areas are too difficult to get a nutplate and allthread into position. For those areas, I positioned the nutplate behind the hole and then inserted a 6-32 screw (with a pre-threaded nut) from the front.

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    These things are rock solid after curing.

    Hope this helps!
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  18. #58
    wireweinie's Avatar
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    I do the same thing with square nuts. Works great and minimizes cracking in the gingerbread.

    Web
    Life's tough . . . wear a cup.
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  19. #59

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    If you can move that top fuel line up about 1/2 inch. Some day down the road someone will loose a screw for that hole and the grab whatever is handy it will be longer and hit the line. Been there, done that.
    DENNY
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  20. #60

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    ELT Installation

    I selected the Artex 345 ELT for my project and opted to mount it in the rear of the upper baggage area. The ELT comes with a tray that must be securely mounted to the airframe. The challenge is: how do you do this if you don’t want to drill into the steel tubing?

    Here I used the following design. If you think its brilliant, I borrowed the idea from Jon Lee. If you don’t like it, I came up with it myself! Essentially, you create a backing plate for the tray that goes underneath the upper baggage floor and wraps around a fuselage tube. Additionally, I positioned it so that it ties into a point where the upper baggage floor is anchored with the rear bulkhead.

    This was a fun project figuring out how to transfer a 3 dimensional piece onto a flat piece of aluminum. The flat outline was not what I would have imagined.

    ELT tray -- this is what needs to get secured to the airframe. (the attached buzzer bracket is discussed below)

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    Paper mock-up next to piece reading for bending.

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    Bending in the brake. Because of the closeness of the bends, I had to just start the bend (i.e. not bend the full 90*) in the brake and then finish by hand. In the first version, I put in the bends exactly backward and couldn't figure out why the diagonal went on the wrong direction! I believe the middle picture below is actually my backward version. I then matched drilled the holes in the tray and drilled for nutplates. I also had the pieces for the upper baggage powder coated.

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    I also created a small bracket to hold the ELT buzzer and anchor to the tray/backing plate.

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    Here is a view from the underside of the backing plate installed. Plus an action shot of my daughter holding it in place so I can put the screws in (this is why we have kids, right?).

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    Once in place, the next step was wiring. Here is a link to some helpful responses to my questions about reading the Artex wiring diagram.

    Finished product. I added a small ground tab to make it easier to work with the wires grounded to the airframe if needed.

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    One final note, in trawling around the web, I understand that there are a couple of formats for the GPS data (it may just be baud rate): 1) 9600 baud Aviation protocol; and 2) 4800 baud NMEA. The Artex 345 must be configured to the same protocol. I have not yet finalized my avionics choices and may be faced with a mismatch. If so, the unit would need to be reprogrammed to match the format.
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  21. #61
    pittsdriver's Avatar
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    Sam, I have the Airtex and it has a jumper wire on the board for the different baud rates. Nice installation. People don't realize the time it takes to figure out a seemingly simple problem.
    Vans RV7 finished 2008
    Backcountry Super Cub finished 2011
    A&P Aircraft rebuilding, Building assistance
    1956 Supercub complete rebuild
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  22. #62

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    Interior panels

    This is a bit out of sequence as fitting and covering the interior panels was one of the first things I did. But a friend had a question about how I covered the D-windows and I realized I didn’t post anything here about it. So here goes…

    With the kit, I opted for the aluminum side panels. I ended up not using the two side panels on the upper baggage as I thought they were not necessary. Also, I had the upper baggage floor and rear bulkhead powder coated (you can see them in my ELT post and below). The remaining panels (lower baggage and cockpit side panels plus metal headliner) I covered with fabric.

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    The initial fit for the panels was accomplished when I was in Brainerd for the builder-assist week. After getting everything home, I did final a final fitting and registered more holes to match the tabs in the fuselage.

    I did make an additional change with regard to the rear extended baggage bulkhead. The left side of the bulkhead was bent such that the side panel that connected on that side left little room for trim and trim indicator cables. So, I put a new bend in the rear bulkhead lip which pulled the side panel a little further in and provided some more room for the cables. Thinking about it now, months later, I could have just put a small block of plastic (sorry, don’t know the name!) to allow the cable to rub on if it made contact.

    Here's a view looking down at cable clearance after I gave it a little more room:

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    Once the panels were all fit, I added markings to the back of each one to help me out later. These markings identified: a) which way is up, b) where the panel goes (and in what order – on top or not), and c) if the hole requires a nutplate (some holes were in spots where the panels just connected to each other and not to a tab on the fuselage).

    As you can guess, I attend the Bill Rusk school of nutplates and used these throughout to accept #6 screws. One note, many of the tabs in the fuselage are too small for standard nutplates. After a couple of false starts, I found the small corner nutplates from Wicks were a good fit. Again, months later, I probably would have used the panel adhesive I wrote about earlier to affix a number of these nutplates. One further note, if you are going to use nutplates, make sure your rivets are nice and flush (especially if you are not going to cover the panels). If the rivets are a tiny bit proud of flush, you will get a slight warp in the panel when you screw it down. Its very tiny and probably not noticeable to almost anybody. But you’ll know! 😊

    As I noted earlier, I decided to cover the panels with fabric. I like the look. There may be some tiny sound dampening properties. And I don’t plan on carrying a lot of moose in the plane. I was able to find the fabric Bill Rusk used (Grey Heather tweed at Perfect Fit) and ordered 5 yards initially; however, I neglected to take into account that I was also going to cover my metal headliner and needed to order a couple more yards to finish things off.

    I started off by gluing a test panel to: 1) check how the process goes; and 2) see how the panel will fit.

    In certain areas where the panel slides into a channel (such as around the rear baggage door), if I wrapped the fabric around the edge of the panel, it was a TIGHT squeeze. So for those areas and the bottom edges, I terminated the fabric at the edge of the panel and cleaned it up with a soldering iron.

    Gluing on the fabric is like working with Formica or similar – apply cement to both surfaces and let get tacky. Use strips of cardboard to allow positioning of fabric on panel. Slowly remove pieces of cardboard to get fabric and panel to adhere appropriately.

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    You'll notice the baggage area fabric is a little darker. I reversed the fabric in this area -- it is darker and appears more durable

    My biggest dilemma was what to do around the D-window in the metal headliner. Since the glue comes off pretty easily with acetone, I did a couple of tests to try different covering methods, I ended up covering the side panel with one piece and cutting it flush at the D-window edge. I then glued a second piece to the D-window edge and butted it up against the first piece. Here’s how it came out.

    Test gluing first piece:
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    Completed window
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    Finally, I started this thread asking about the felt used for the tubes and shown in the Piper drawings. As usual got some excellent suggestions. I ended up going with felt from McMaster Carr.

    Hope this helps someone!
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  23. #63

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    Fitting the windshield

    Fitting Windshield
    The narrow-body Super Cub comes with the two-piece aluminum windshield trim strip from Univair (link just in case there is a need to order another one…). The wide-body comes with composite strips that I understand are much easier to install. This fact alone may push one to seriously consider the wide body! This step took me a long time. A big part of the time was learning how to stretch and shrink aluminum in a way that was acceptable to me.

    I’ll outline my methods below in the hopes that they help somebody else out. I am by no means an expert here and there may be much better methods.
    If you search youtube for “backcountry supercub windshield”, you’ll hopefully find the video laying out the process for the Backcountry supercub. It’s not exactly the same, but is a good primer.

    Before getting into the process, I thought I’d lay out the main tools I used:

    Bending block – I copied something similar I saw in Jay’s shop. This tool was indispensable for bending the trim strips using something other than the boot cowl. I made mine by taking a belt sander to a piece of 4x4. By the way, in the picture below, you can see something of a before and after in terms of the trim strips and how they end up a little more squared through the bending process.

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    Metal stretcher/shrinker from Harbor Freight – I agonized over purchasing these because they cost about $150 and I can’t think of another time I’ll use them besides this time. However, since I’d never worked with tools like this before, I didn’t want to borrow them from someone and feel like I had to hurry up and use them to get them back (that being said, if anyone wants to borrow mine, you’re welcome to them!) These are pretty simple tools and might need a little grease and attention prior to their use. At one point during the project, the shrinking tool was not operating smoothly until I took it apart, cleaned it up and added some grease – then it was good to go again.

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    Hammer and dolly set – So far, I’ve used this for a few purposes: 1) knocking down some of the ridges from the tooling above; 2) “stretching” the material when it only needed a little stretch; and 3) removing the bevel bend in the top of the front trim strip in order to put it in the stretch or shrink tool.

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    Inner/rear windshield strip

    As I was contemplating writing this up, I was thinking of suggesting that the best approach to getting this right was to just rub your lucky rabbit’s foot and burn some sage. Then, I was heartened re-reading Bill Rusk’s write-up on the matter:
    I wish I could give really good directions for installing the inner windshield strip but this one is tough.
    Here is how I ended up approaching it along with some additional hints. I don’t know that this is the best way to approach it – just how I did it.

    Step 1: Using a fabric tape, locate and mark the center of each trim strip.

    Step 2: Measure back 5” from the top of the firewall and make a mark on the boot cowl (equally between the two rows of rivets). The front edge of the rear trim strip will go here.

    Step 3: Reference line: Mark the top middle of the windshield and the bottom of the windshield. Place the windshield on the boot cowl. Line up the top middle mark with the center Piper channel and lightly clamp the top of the windshield in place. Line up the bottom middle mark on the windshield with the mark on the boot cowl from step #2. Secure the sides of the windshield as well using clamps. Trace the bottom of the windshield onto the boot cowl. This is to provide a general idea of how the trim strip will curve around the boot cowl.

    Step 4: Carefully bend the strip to match the contour of the boot cowl

    This (and step 5) is the hardest part and took the longest

    Use a bending block as described above and take your time. I always tried to quit for the day when I found myself getting antsy about the results.

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    Don’t kink it – it’s very easy to put too much bending pressure on the strip if you’re not paying attention and have your hands too far apart. The fix for this (for me) was to only bend when my hands were very close to each other. Once you kink the metal, it will always want to bend at that point and making further shaping very difficult. I had what I’ll call an “incipient” kink that I had to be very careful with – and which impacted how tightly I could bend the strip on the left side.

    Step 5: Once you’ve got the strip pretty close to matching the shape of the boot cowl, start thinking about how you are going to get the windshield-backing part of the strip to align with the windshield. I did this by taping down the trim strip “about” where it would go and then putting the windshield on. This gave me a general idea of how the windshield would meet the trim strip.

    You will likely have “pooches” where the strip is sticking up at too sharp of an angle from the boot cowl and needs to relax a bit. For me, this was in the very front and right at the sharper turns on the sides. These areas need to be “shrunk”.

    The shrinker essentially grabs the aluminum and squeezes it together thereby “shrinking” the material. In the case of the trim strip, shrinking the metal -- and I only put the wide end (i.e. the backing) of the trim strip in the shrinker or stretcher – either pulls the backing back toward the cockpit or allows a sharper bend of the trim strip while keeping the backing in the same place.

    Below is a couple of pictures from when I was working on the front trim strip showing the results of using the shrinker (of course the second picture looks like I'm just pressing harder, but that's honestly not the case!)
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    I made a bunch of test strips to get a feel for how much pressure to use on the tool and what results I got.

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    There is a limit to how much aluminum can be worked and I tried not to find that limit.

    Step 6: Drill holes

    First, try to wait as long as possible to drill holes in the strip – there are a few reasons for this. First, as Jay taught me with the fuel lines during the builder’s assist week, it’s a good idea to work the part until its “happy” in its position. In other words, better not have it in place under stress. Second, you can crack the metal at the holes if you continue to work it significantly after the holes were drilled. Finally, after the 3rd or 4th time you re-cleco the piece onto the cowl, you will begin to experience loose clecos which result from the #40 holes beginning to wallow out. Not only do these clecos not do their job, you may be forced to move to a larger rivet (not the end of the world, but seems like it should be avoided).

    The inner strip has a hole in the center and then additional holes every 2”. Using a #40 bit, drill and cleco the center hole and then proceed outward from the center. After I had a few holes on either side, I paused the drilling, took the strip off, and made bending adjustments before continuing to drill. Here's a picture of the inner strip clecoed in place with the windshield.

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    Also, don’t rush replacing the trim strip after you’ve made some shrinking or other adjustments. Take the time to make sure it is re-bent to fit nicely. Otherwise, you’ll be putting unnecessary stress on the clecos. Also, pay attention to a few-hole’s-distance beyond the hole you’re currently drilling to make sure you’re headed in the right direction before securing the strip.

    You will also need to “flatten” the trim strip where the side of the boot cowl is essentially vertical at the end. Also, you may need to put a little more bend into the instrument panel as it may stick out a bit too much where the rear trim strip passes it. Finally, the backcountry video has a pretty good description of where the trim strip should end up (in terms of up and down location). For length, I cut it short of the “fuselage side” (not sure the name) so that the windshield could lie flush on the inner trim strip and the fuselage side (i.e. on the same plane)

    Step 7: Final adjustment and riveting

    Once you have the holes drilled and the strip clecoed in place, put the windshield on and check for proper fit with the trim strip. If there are gaps, those areas need to be stretched. If there are “pooches”, those areas need to be shrunk.

    When you’re happy with the fit, remove the strip and countersink the holes for rivets. (Technically, I think the material thickness calls for dimpling, but I went with counter-sinking and like the results). The rivets you will be placing are temporary and you’ll be drilling them out. As such, use aluminum rivets. I was able to find 3/32” aluminum flush pop rivets from McMaster Carr.

    For riveting, like the clecos, start from the middle and work your way out. I drafted my son to crawl into the cockpit and place opposing pressure from the inside of the boot cowl so that I could put some good pressure on the rivet and avoid any gaps in the riveting and get a nice tight fit.

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    Step 8: Place the windshield on and use a ratchet strap (attached to the strut fitting points). The picture in step 6 above shows the ratchet strap in place. Somewhere along the way, I drilled the top of the windshield to be able to secure it. But I left drilling the sides until the end. Also, I trimmed a little bit of the bottom of the windshield in a couple of places where it was hanging too low on the inner trim strip. I used a Dremel and made multiple passes with pauses in between so that the plastic never got too hot. Also, I ended up putting on and taking off the windshield a number of times and adjusting the inner trim strip until I has happy with the fit (I should say “happier” because as I write this, I am still considering one more stretch of the inner strip after I remove the temporary clecos.

    Step 9: Fit the front windshield strip. This is a little easier this time around because the rear strip and windshield is already on – so you’re not guessing as much about fit. Essentially, repeat steps 4-6 with the front trim strip. (As you get to about where the final holes would be, go to step 10).

    You’ll notice that the front trim strip has a slight bevel bend at the top. You’ll need to remove this in order to use the stretcher/shrinkers. I used the hammer and dolly for this.
    The holes will begin one inch out from the center and proceed every two inches (so that each hole is between the holes in the inner strip). I just measured the center point between each inner strip rivet and drew a line outward. Then, I put on the outer strip and transferred the lines onto the strip to know where to drill.

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    Step 10: Side trim pieces. The side trim pieces are secured with five screws. In order to give some room on the backside next to the tube, I placed the holes 7/16” from the edge of the trim strip (and underlying fuselage). I put the first hole about an inch down from the top. The bottom home, if all goes well, will marry: the outer strip, the side trim strip, the windshield, and the fuselage side (see picture below). After these two, I placed another three screws equally placed down the trim strip.
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  24. #64
    pittsdriver's Avatar
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    Sam, Instead of going through all that work it is very easy to lay up a composite fairing. I get the windshield fitted and lay up the fiberglass cloth and resin directly to the windshield and cowl over a release such as duct tape. Total time to fabricate is an hour or so for a fairing that fits perfectly.
    Vans RV7 finished 2008
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    1956 Supercub complete rebuild

  25. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by pittsdriver View Post
    Sam, Instead of going through all that work it is very easy to lay up a composite fairing. I get the windshield fitted and lay up the fiberglass cloth and resin directly to the windshield and cowl over a release such as duct tape. Total time to fabricate is an hour or so for a fairing that fits perfectly.
    Funny you should raise this. I thought of this very post of yours often during the process!

  26. #66
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    It is a pretty easy process but I've been doing fiberglass starting with surfboards when I was 12. Working with composites is a good skill to have in your bag as there are all kinds of things you can do even on a Cub. Here is a carbon fiber instrument panel overlay. Something to think about for the next airplane you build. By the way that is the nicest aluminum fairing I have ever seen on a Cub.
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    Vans RV7 finished 2008
    Backcountry Super Cub finished 2011
    A&P Aircraft rebuilding, Building assistance
    1956 Supercub complete rebuild
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  27. #67
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    Sam

    Awesome write up. THANK YOU!!. That is one of the most difficult parts of the whole build. That and the lower cowl. I have begun to tell folks to do that part during the builder assist with Jay. ie get him to help you with the really hard stuff. Great job. It will look fantastic. I also agree that if you have some fiberglass experience that way will yield a perfect trim strip as well.

    Thanks for posting

    Bill

    Oh yeah......UHMW (ultra high molecular weight) is the plastic stuff that works great for high abrasion areas. You can even get it in a "tape". I used it on the bottom of my fuel pod where the water rudder retract cable just barely touches the pod. Great stuff in a lot of places. Great for Ski bottoms too
    Very Blessed. "It's not an obsession, it's a passion"
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  28. #68

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    Fitting wings (part 1)

    Fitting the Wings
    I took the project to the airport and made it look “planey”. Here are the major tasks I did to prepare and install the wings and perform other related tasks:
    Preparation – Initially I thought I could hang the wings in my driveway before realizing all the stuff I’d need to do. So, I needed to have it in a place it could sit with the wings on for an extended period of time. And that was the airport. The project was at the airport for about a month during this process.

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    Before heading to the airport, I did some basic prep at home including test fitting all the hardware and removing powder coating from bolt holes where necessary.
    I also prepped the lift struts. The lift struts are extruded aluminum into which you will bolt blocks at either end. Jay suggested applying zinc chromate/phosphate to the inside of the struts where the blocks are inserted. I did that and tried to spray a little further into the strut.

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    Once the strut interiors were primed and dried, it was time to insert the blocks. For the top blocks, the portion that bolts to the wing will be angled coming out of the lift strut. The block on the top of the forward lift strut should be turned so that it angles back. The block on the top of the rear lift strut should be turned so that it angles forward. For the bottom block for the forward lift strut, the threaded hole for the fork is off-center. You will need to position this block in the strut such that, after the forks are threaded and the struts are attached to the fuselage, the top of the front and rear strut are flush with one another (the bottom of the front strut will drop down a little below the rear strut).

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    I put the bolts in the struts such that the heads would always face toward the wing / up. For torqueing the nuts on the lift struts, I used guidance on this site (which also agrees with AC43-13). (The main consideration here is which way to orient the heads of the bolts. Of course, they all need to point the same direction. For airflow purposes, I chose to have the bolts arranged such that an angle of the hex head of the bolts faces into the wind. I’m sure this will make the plane much faster!)
    Once I got the project to the airport, I removed the flaps and ailerons, which were attached with temporary hardware by Javron, and the fuel tanks.
    I also built the wing stands suggested by EAA (EAA link). The Javron wing stand is good for shipping but not as good for taking on and off. It was nice to have a ready spot to put the wings.

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    Wing installation – here’s the process I followed:

    • Prep struts below as the front strut will go on immediately after wing is attached
    • Re-check all attach points with hardware to confirm everything fits


    • 3 people – one at wingtip and one at each wing root attach point. Wingtip guy holds it up while wing is fit and strut is attached (consider getting this jack stand from Harbor Freight to give the end guy a break)


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    • Can temporarily secure/align holes with screw driver
    • Wing attach bolt may need light tapping with rubber hammer
    • While prepping for next step, can quick clamp 2x4 vertically to compression strut to hold wing (repeat this step later when first wing is on so that plane doesn’t tip due to imbalance)


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    Attach lift struts

    • Prep
      • Per Jay’s suggestion: to pre-set front strut for proper dihedral: screw bolt onto fork as far as it will go. Screw fork into block such that space between bolt and block is .375” - .400” then tighten bolt onto block. (this was later adjusted, see dihedral and washout adjustments below.)
      • Check fitting on upper end of strut (this hole might be a bit small)

    • Raise strut to match angle of how it will finally fit (BCSC manual has pictures of this)
    • Angle has to match just right so that bottom fork can go on strut attach fitting
    • Attach bottom first then top
    • Clamp vertical 2x4 to compression strut so that plane won’t tip with one wing. Wing will stay on airplane with just front strut on
    • Repeat process with other wing and remove 2x4 off first wing
    • Repeat process with rear strut
    • Setting washout:
      • Javron sets their angle of incidence slightly higher than stock. Therefore, you can’t use the stock rigging instructions for washout. The following process was suggested by Jay:
      • Using a digital level, zero the level at the wing root rib
      • Go out to #15 rib (round wingtip) and level with 1/8” spacer at 30” (similar to stock rigging which uses a 3/8” spacer) – should see 1.8* on digital level (I modified this slightly and through some trigonometry, accounted for the 1/8” spacer by changing the angle to 2* (2.04 to be exact)

    • Dihedral and washout adjustments – I had to make some adjustments to my initial settings. When I first set the wings, the measurement of the strut forks noted above was .400”. This resulted in a 4” distance from a string strung wingtip to wingtip to the spar at the wing root. After a couple of adjustments, I ended up with the measurements at .330” - .340” and the string was now 3.25” to the wing spar.


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    • For washout, I measured about a million times and finally got both wings to the same washout at 2*.


    Run cables

    • Aileron cable behind front spar goes overhead in fuselage – this cable stays in wing during cover
    • Once you get cables on and can move stick, note where cables will exit the fabric (so after cover, you know where to cut holes for exit points) Jay measures distance from front wing strut
    • Gas tank – there are two fairleads that go in here. Put those guides in now (permanently). Make sure snap rings are on gas tank bay side so that they can be removed if needed later. (For fun, see how many times you can drop these while trying to put them in…my PR is five times)
    • Lift strut guides and fairleads – install these temporarily so that you can get a feel for the aileron movement with them in (see if there is any binding, etc).
    • Flap cable – the ends of this cable need to be swaged (this task is left with builder to help meet the 51% rule)
      • Using mechanic wire, secure “splitter plate” of flap cable in fuselage. First, attach flap handle and cable to flap handle. Make sure cable is taught all the way to splitter plate. Then secure splitter plate to fuselage using mechanic wire (can pull forward to seat belt attach tube and attach to sides as well). Important to make sure plate is centered in fuselage (so that cables are equal length to flaps and, therefore, apply equal force to flaps when used.

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    • Screw ends of barrels on turnbuckle – make sure two threads showing on each side. Put up in bell crank.

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    • Take crimper, come up from bottom, pull it and pull sleeve against thimble, one guy runs swedge and one guy runs cable. Follow AC43-13: One crimp in middle to set. Crimp two is side closest to eye. Crimp three is farthest from eye.
    • Aileron cable – overhead has some plates to hook together. 3” long. Hole on each end.
    • Aileron stop on torque tube – can unscrew these stop bolts to the point that torque tube is held straight up and down. I had some trouble with the getting the floor aileron pulleys in the housing – they were a little tight. I made a simple spreader with a bolt and some nuts with very good results.


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    • Once the cables are set, I took lots of pictures and compared my measurements with the Piper wing covering drawings to note where cable would exit the fabric.


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    Part 2 will cover fitting the wing root fairings
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  29. #69

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    Note the angle to the top aileron cable has as it exits the top of the wing. The grommet and cover that is on top of the wing has to match that angle. I see lots of cubs that had the cover slot placed perpendicular to the false spar and had to be cut out to match.
    DENNY
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  30. #70

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    Your project is astounding....your attention to detail is spot on! Nice work! If I build another Cub, it will be a Javron...
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  31. #71

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    Fitting wing root fairings

    Fitting wing root fairings

    First a little background – the Javron kit comes with a four piece wing root fairing set per wing: rear, top, bottom and front. My understanding is that the Javron wing root fairing does not have the “tightening” mechanism of standard cubs. I believe this is due to the size of the flaps (i.e. the extend all the way to the fuselage). Therefore, you don’t have the cinching action of tightening the fairing. As a result, you need to secure the fairings a bit more. There are many ways to skin this cat and the way I did it may not be best for you but here goes...

    I started with the rear fairing. Jon Lee was good enough to stop by Jay’s shop and take a bunch of pictures that really helped show where things got attached. In the photo below, you can see how I attached this fairing. I also used to tape to simulate the fabric covering to ensure I had clearance. On top, I notched the fairing where the skylight trim strip comes across – this is that the top fairing strip will overlap on a relatively flat surface. Finally, you’ll note that I made a small notch in the fairing where the fuel line exits the (future) fabric.

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    The top fairing gets secured to both the butt rib and the piper channel on the sides of the skylight (thereby securing the skylight as well in this spot). If you want your holes on either side (wing side and fuselage side) of the wing root fairing to line up, you’ll need to locate the screws on the wing side first. The fairing is intended to butt against the fuel tank cover (not overlapping) on the butt rib. However, the butt rib has rivets where the lip for the fuel tank cover is attached and flutes to create a bend in the top of the rib. Given the rivets and the flutes, you are limited to the spaces between these rivets and flutes to locate your holes to attach the wing root fairing.

    The next photo shows the placement of the right top wing root fairing. Both of the rear clecos go through this fairing as well as the rear fairing.

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    Here is a view of the left side rear and top fairing and how they are attached.

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    Here is a view of the bottom right fairing and how it is attached.

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    You may notice that around the hinges, there is a lot going on. And trying to locate nutplates in here was going to be a challenge. So, I made a nutplate “subpanel” if you will.

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    The front fairings probably took me more time than the others combined! I started with poster board templates. Below is a picture of one I reversed in order to give me a straight line to lay down a masking tape guide.

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    I attached the poster board and cut it down until I had an even gap to the windshield (and a mostly pleasing symmetry when viewing them head on). Keep in mind that the required gap changes based on the orientation of the fairing to the windshield – at the top, it lays on top of the windshield (almost parallel), and at the bottom the fairing is perpendicular to the windshield. I then used the poster board as templates to modify the front fairings provided. Here is a picture of it in place (should have taken more pictures!)

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    I then took a ton of pictures of the control cables and where the would exit the fabric – I hope I took the right ones and answer my own questions when covering!
    One final note, in the picture above, the front right hole ends up in a very difficult place to put a nutplate. I crafted the simple tool below that allowed me to put 3M adhesive to the ears of the nutplate, secure it and fish it into the recess of the frame and then “grab” it with a screw. Seemed to workout ok.

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    Until next time, here is a picture of my daughter Sofia hard at work at Marty’s fabric covering seminar at Oshkosh! 😊

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  32. #72

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    Under-seat bulkhead

    Under-seat bulkhead

    This was a pretty straightforward project. Underneath the rear seat, there is a gap. I believe the original Super Cubs have a leather/fabric panel here to make it look nice and prevent (somewhat prevent?) items from dropping into the nether regions of the plane. I decided to make a simple aluminum panel to cover this area which would be screwed into the floor and would bend over the rear seat cross tube at the top.

    First thing I did was make a template out of poster board. I then cut holes in the sides for the rudder cables and a hole in the center for the elevator cables. This center hole comes out somewhat triangular because the bottom cable swings more with the movement of the stick/torque tube than the upper cable.

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    The most challenging part of making the template was figuring out the right height to make it so that it was flush with the floor and folder over the cross tube nicely. I finally realized that the floorboard has a slight bow to it – so a straight-line bend was not going to give you the same distance at all points. (Note: I pretty much did a straight-line bend and it came out fine in the end).

    I then transferred the template measurements over to the aluminum and cut out the holes before bending it.

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    I then bent the panel in a brake. However, because of the tight bends around the cross tube, I was only able to “start” the bends which I finished as follows. (If you meet my wife, be sure to tell her THAT'S why I keep that old wood around! )

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    To secure the bottom of the panel to the floorboards, placed the panel in position and located 4 holes evenly on each side of the center cutout. Before locating the holes, I also ran some tape on the topside of the floorboard to mark where the diagonal cross tubes are under it…and avoided those spots. Once the holes were drilled, I used the same tee nuts I used for fastening the hinge on the rear seat. If you imagine screws instead of clecos, here is what the finished product looks like:

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    Edit to add: it was suggested that you could also attach the bulkhead to the floor behind the bulkhead (i.e. make the bend 180* in the other direction). I like this suggestion and would probably set it up this way if doing it again. It would make the presentation a bit cleaner.
    Last edited by Sam D; 09-07-2021 at 12:23 PM.
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  33. #73

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    Wing Stands

    Wing Stands

    I’m turning to working on my wings. I don’t have a rotisserie (yet? Still hoping to borrow instead of buy) and didn’t really want to set the wings on the ribs. In Bill Rusk’s Javron wing building thread, it looked like there were some wing stands, so I stole the idea and made some out of wood:

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    I didn’t realize the wing root side is actually at different levels (should have looked at the stand the wings came on!) but this was easily fixed by drilling a second hole.

  34. #74

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    Landing/Taxi Light Installation

    Landing/Taxi Light Installation

    For the taxi/landing lights, I opted for two-single lights (one in each wing) in order to have wig wag. I’ve seen these lights located in a number of positions on the wing and I chose the somewhat standard position of the first bay outboard of lift strut attach/N-brace bay.

    If you order the light kit from Javron, here’s what you get (well you actually get two of everything shown, except the hardware. You also get the lens for the light(s). Mine was a single piece that I needed to cut in half but this may not be common as I originally had a single light unit and opted to change to two units.

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    Here is my single lens before I cut it in half. I was trying to get the cut just right on the center, but as you will see later, these pieces are quite a bit larger than you will actually need.

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    Marking the opening


    First, I marked where opening goes on leading edge as follows:

    • Center: Center line was located equidistant between leading edge screws into ribs (my positioning)
    • Top: 4 11/16ths inches back from bend on leading edge -- hook a tape measure over (as suggested by Jay)
    • Bottom: 4 ½” back from leading edge bend on bottom (also suggested by Jay)
    • Side: Measure width of the opening of the bezel (the frame that will hold the clear plastic lens on the wing). Add one inch to this measurement (1/2” per side) (Jay again)

    Just a couple of side comments here. First, keep in mind that the bottom of the wing will be what’s visible when the plane is sitting on its gear. If, like me, your wing is sitting on a table at this point, the bottom of the wing will be difficult to get to (and therefore easy to mess up!). Also, you really can’t measure too many times. Keep measuring the top and bottom and sides and test fitting the bezel until you are comfortable that everything is where it should be (I aspire to be so good that some day I’ll only need to measure twice before cutting once!)

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    For drawing nice even lines on the sides, you can use a strap of aluminum. A trim piece you’ve previously fouled up makes an excellent tool!
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    Cutting the hole

    Then, I said a little prayer and proceeded to cut into the leading edge as follows:

    I drilled the corners first and used a ½” step drill (after drawing the holes on the leading edge). I also used the step drill a little like a router to make a slightly larger area to cut into. After this, I used the snips to cut out the hole (starting about ½” from the line and getting closer on successive passes) and finished with a combination of a file, Dremel with sanding bit and sanding block to finish it up.

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    Installing the channels

    There are airfoil-shaped channels for the sides and straight channels for the top and the bottom. Each channel has a narrow edge (3/8”) and a wide edge (1/2”) with a joggle or step in between. The channels will step down toward the center of the opening in order to hold the light cover. By looking at the airfoil-shaped channel, it becomes somewhat clear that the narrow edge will go under the leading-edge skin while the wide edge holds the light cover.

    Based on Jay’s advice, I located the side channels as follows:
    Straight channels (top and bottom) will go in first. They will be riveted in place with the rivets that will also hold the nutplates for the bezel. (Note: if you’re following the Backcountry manual, this is a departure from their approach). The bezel will only be screwed in along the top and bottom.
    Plan on 4-5 nut-plates evenly spaced across the top and bottom of the opening. Further, plan on the 2 outer-edge screws aligning with the vertical line of rivets that will hold the side channels in place.

    I laid out where the channel pieces would go on the leading edge. Based on that, I located the holes 3/16” from the outside edge of the channel pieces. I drilled the holes in the leading edge and then drew lines on the center line of the 3/8” edge of the channel strips. I then sighted this line through the holes already drilled to position the channel strips under the holes and drilled them out.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Cutting the light cover
    At this point, I positioned the light cover over the wing opening and, using masking tape, marked the opening on the cover.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I used a Dremel to make the initial cut on the lend cover (with multiple passes so as not to “linger” in any one spot and overheat the plastic). After the initial cut, I used a sanding block to get the fit just right.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Installing the light assembly

    Before installing the side channels, the opening is at its largest, so it’s a good time to install the light assembly. Each assembly has two “plates” with large circle where light goes. One of these plates has a longer flange on two side with two holes. This is the back plate and those two holes are to connect to the side pieces. The other is the front plate which will screw into the back plate holding the light in place. For this step, you don’t need to assemble the front plate with the light (but I did). The side pieces have one hole above a series of holes in an arc. The series of holes is to be able to adjust the light. A taxi light will be tilted farther down so that it does not point into the sky when the plane is sitting on the ground. Also, I installed nuplates on the back plate to make it easier to attach the front plate in the future.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Finally, you’ll need to decide whether the flanges of the side pieces point out (i.e. are visible on the side of the assembly) or point in (are hidden behind the assembly). I chose to keep the flanges pointing out to make them easier to get to.

    Once I put together the light assembly, I positioned it against the spar – both centered in the hold and slightly above the bottom spar cap. I then temporarily installed the channels to confirm that the light assembly had adequate clearance. Then I drilled out the holes. I found the easiest way to do this was to use a 12” #28 bit.

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    Installing channel strips

    I riveted the side strips first so that I could confirm that when I positioned the bezel for drilling, I could confirm that it covered the sides with the channels installed.

    Drilling bezel


    Before installing the top and bottom strips, I added two layers of masking tape to simulate cover and paint. I also drew an extended line across the holes I had drilled in the top and bottom to make sure they lined up right on the bezel. Then I positioned the bezel for drilling and used a 90* drill to back drill the holes

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Nutplate install

    My last task was to enlarge the #40 holes in the top and bottom to accept #6 screws and drill and install nutplates (to also secure the channels)

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    Eventually, I will probably have the front light plate powder-coated black. And I will repeat this whole process on the right wing… 😊

    Hope this helps.
    Last edited by Sam D; Yesterday at 06:11 PM.
    Likes Steve Pierce liked this post

  35. #75
    soyAnarchisto's Avatar
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    I love these threads so much. Erry time I lift the carpet, or lie on my back and look up behind the panel of my 66 year old aereoplane, I dream of building my own experimental super cub!
    Likes jrussl, Sam D, NoFlaps, supercrow liked this post

  36. #76
    Jlee's Avatar
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    Great write up as always Sam!


    Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org
    Thanks Sam D thanked for this post

  37. #77
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Awesome write up Sam. Please keep it up. And THANK YOU!!

    Bill
    Very Blessed. "It's not an obsession, it's a passion"
    Thanks Sam D thanked for this post

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