Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 40 of 119

Thread: Suggestions on hangar size

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Seldovia, Alaska
    Posts
    143
    Post Thanks / Like

    Suggestions on hangar size

    With cost a significant factor, how large should a hangar be to accommodate two cubs? Again with cost a consideration how wide and how long

  2. #2
    skywagon8a's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    SE Mass
    Posts
    9,272
    Post Thanks / Like
    Cut 2 scaled top views of the Cub out of a piece of paper. Draw different sized and shaped hangars on a piece of paper to the same scale as the Cubs. Practice moving them around as though you were packing the hangar. Do you want to get one out without moving the other one? Take that into consideration. The type of door can dictate the height of the hangar. Don't make it too tight just to save money. You'll regret it later. You could consider a turntable which can cut down on the door opening.
    N1PA

  3. #3
    fobjob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Salt Lake City, Utah
    Posts
    2,047
    Post Thanks / Like
    A 32’ by 42’ hanger will NOT handle two cubs....and that’s before I put workbenches in it.....
    Likes mike mcs repair liked this post

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Clearwater,Fl
    Posts
    2,533
    Post Thanks / Like
    40 x 40 with 2 doors should work , stagger/canted the airplanes just a little
    http://miracletruss.com/strong-flexi...hoCCLAQAvD_BwE

    for bi-fold I really like my Hi Fold. Great Guys, Good to work with, forget the other company.

    Another root would be 2 x 6 stud walls with Union corrugated panels or local mfg. You will need to engineer the door openings for bi-fold though Its very doable. Sliders are by far the least expensive but require the most work to open.
    Likes Hardtailjohn liked this post

  5. #5
    cubdriver2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    upstate NY
    Posts
    9,791
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mine is 44 x 36 and fit a Champ and Pa11 with a single door

    Glenn
    "Optimism is going after Moby Dick in a rowboat and taking the tartar sauce with you!"

  6. #6

    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Brenham, Texas
    Posts
    34
    Post Thanks / Like
    Don’t listen to them! (No offense guys), Listen carefully. “You can’t build it too big!” No matter how big you build it there will come a time you wished you’d built it bigger!

  7. #7

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    SE Montana
    Posts
    165
    Post Thanks / Like
    Build it as big as you can afford! There's no such thing as being too big when it comes to a shop or hangar! Check under the couch cushions and car seats for extra change to stretch your budget as much as you can!

  8. #8
    Eddie Foy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    3,404
    Post Thanks / Like
    Pete is right. Make a scale model. I hear you. Mine will be 80 X 80.

    Quote Originally Posted by 1934A View Post
    Build it as big as you can afford! There's no such thing as being too big when it comes to a shop or hangar! Check under the couch cushions and car seats for extra change to stretch your budget as much as you can!
    "Put out my hand and touched the face of God!"

  9. #9
    aktango58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    18AA
    Posts
    9,057
    Post Thanks / Like
    With 60 wide and 40 deep, I could squeeze three birds inside, but with two you could move in and out without moving the other one. Three was tight, and had a hard time with putting break and shear in place with that set up.

    Cessna wings are about 36' wide, like the cub, unless you have extensions, then they are just under 40'.

    More space is better! wide door will pay great dividends in the future.

    look at the height of the tail of a 206, and prop tip on 185 type planes when sizing the door also, having a door that is 2' taller might be a good thing in the future.

    Pay now, or cry later
    I don't know where you've been me lad, but I see you won first Prize!
    Likes skywagon8a, phdigger123, Hardtailjohn liked this post

  10. #10
    skywagon8a's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    SE Mass
    Posts
    9,272
    Post Thanks / Like
    60 wide would be a minimum for two or three planes. My hangar is 70 wide and I can put two float planes in there backed into corners without moving the other one to get either one out. Any less, it would require a lot of maneuvering. 50 wide would mean moving the one in front to get at the back one.
    N1PA
    Thanks Bill.Brine thanked for this post
    Likes Hardtailjohn liked this post

  11. #11

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Fowler, Ks
    Posts
    525
    Post Thanks / Like
    2 cubs 50x50. Put hangar doors in both ends.


    Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org
    Likes sharp, Farmboy liked this post

  12. #12
    C-GZUP Jorfarms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Mervin Sask.
    Posts
    26
    Post Thanks / Like
    A wise man told me you can cheap out and be happy that day or do it right and be sad that day but happy forever after that. Mine is 60*70 with a 45 ft door and 18 ft ceiling. Make sure your ceiling is high enough for float plane just in case.
    The bad news is time flies. The good news is that your the pilot.
    Likes Hardtailjohn liked this post

  13. #13

    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Canyon, tx
    Posts
    389
    Post Thanks / Like
    Like aktango58 said, 60’ wide x 40’ deep. Configure the hangar to where you can come back and add another 20’ to the back side when funding allows. Use a lighter tin color to minimize fading making it easier to match the old and new roof and sidewalls.

    You’ll hate yourself if you skimp on the size. Hangar rash sucks. I built a 60’ x 60’ hangar last yr, keep one cub in it and still have come close to hitting crap.
    Thanks DJG thanked for this post
    Likes Hardtailjohn liked this post

  14. #14

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Meanwhile,...
    Posts
    4,998
    Post Thanks / Like
    If you are where you can exit two directions a nested tee with doors for each plane is great mine was 30x 60 and had a small office/ shop on one end and a bath in the opposite corner but you do have to buy two doors. Or do a bigger hanger with one door and buy a good tug likely for less money or at worst a wash.
    Last edited by OLDCROWE; 06-09-2019 at 12:47 PM.
    Remember, These are the Good old Days!

  15. #15
    G44's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    446
    Post Thanks / Like
    48x48 minimum, this will store both airplanes and leave a little room for benches and tools. The reason I say 48 instead of 50 is because for most truss makers 48 is the cut off before increasing costs. If you can get 50 or 52 trusses and minimal cost then do that. If you go this size you will have to move one to get the other out. 60 wide is bare minimum to be able to get one out without having to move the other. As for the 2 door suggestion, for the cost of a second door you could have added more size to the hangar, something to consider. Also, the wider the door the better, try to at least install 42 wide, that way you can get extended wing Cessna's and Cubs in.

    If you put windows in for light consider putting them in up high for security, harder for wandering eyes to peep into or break into your hangar. Insulate if you can afford it even if you are in a mild climate and dont plan of installing heat, this helps with moisture. Don't go cheap of "Rube Goldberg" on your door, you will regret it. A "one push" button operated door that works well is oh so nice!

    Kurt
    Thanks Redwagon thanked for this post

  16. #16

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Seldovia, Alaska
    Posts
    143
    Post Thanks / Like
    I appreciate all these thoughts. I have three planes and I need three planes like I need three arm pits. One is going to go, probably the 182. And since I’m circling the drain as it is I don't need to think too far into the future. My wife’s next husband will have to deal with that.

  17. #17
    G44's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    446
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by reliableflyer View Post
    I appreciate all these thoughts. I have three planes and I need three planes like I need three arm pits. One is going to go, probably the 182. And since I’m circling the drain as it is I don't need to think too far into the future. My wife’s next husband will have to deal with that.
    Then go at least 48 wide and 60 deep, cheaper to go deeper than wider. I have been able to get 3 airplanes (2 Stearmans and a Widgeon) in a 50 by 50 but we had to use wheel dollys and it was for winter storage. We had to get very creative to do it and there was wing overlap, it was almost impossible to walk around from one end of the hangar to the other but I was amazed we made it work.

  18. #18

    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    412
    Post Thanks / Like
    What door width do you think works best on a 60x60
    Staying alive in an airplane has a lot more to do with mastering ourselves than mastering the aircraft.

  19. #19

    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Canyon, tx
    Posts
    389
    Post Thanks / Like
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	D983B76A-6B99-4305-B02D-5049C3E94677.jpg 
Views:	102 
Size:	77.8 KB 
ID:	43219
    Higher Power. 52’ x 14’ on a 60’ x 60’ hangar. Door price jumps $1500 or so over 52’
    Thanks MT12 thanked for this post
    Likes Hardtailjohn liked this post

  20. #20
    G44's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    446
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by MT12 View Post
    What door width do you think works best on a 60x60
    52 would be nice, minimum of 50
    Thanks MT12 thanked for this post
    Likes phdigger123, Hardtailjohn liked this post

  21. #21

    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska Carefree, AZ
    Posts
    217
    Post Thanks / Like
    Size the hangar to the biggest airplane that would be based on your field. If not on private property at your house, size for resale down the road, thus size for the biggest possible to attract the highest price when time to sell. Usually bigger hangars are in short supply, but bring highest prices.
    In the interim you have a nice big hangar for your use.
    Personally I have done several with 60' doors, to me that is the smallest that works for multiple aircraft. Deeper is better, and does cost less.
    Max clear door height is one that can work for amphibs, if no amphib needs ever, then probably 16" clear is good.
    John
    Likes Pete Schoeninger, Bill Rusk liked this post

  22. #22

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Fowler, Ks
    Posts
    525
    Post Thanks / Like
    My 50x60 has single piece powerlift doors in both ends. Its nice not to have to move the Cub to get my combine, truck, boat, spracoupe, or racecar outt


    Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org
    Thanks silflexer thanked for this post

  23. #23
    sniffler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Hawkins Texas
    Posts
    109
    Post Thanks / Like
    Pilot friend with hangar next to me went Higher Power, went to back his motor home in and found out it wouldn’t fit. (Had to put a big roll up door out the back of the hangar) The Higher Power door pivots inside and under the ceiling/header/truss. Also has a weird pivoting sweeping motion about a 1/3 of the way down where the cam/pivot point is and gaskets never seal right. About 1/3 of the door is inside when open so you don’t have as much of an awning when open. I went with PowerLift, a retrofit as I had old sliding barn doors (those sliding doors are total junk) pivots from top of openings so maximum height, has a full length top seal and the sides come down like a casement window and seal, bottom has a simple straight in rubber sweep seal as it closes. All of door pivots out so full awning. All of these new style hydraulic doors are so much nicer than the old bifolds. Wired my power pack with a dryer whip cord to a dryer outlet so if there was ever a power outage I just fire up a generator, plug in the door and open it.

  24. #24

    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska Carefree, AZ
    Posts
    217
    Post Thanks / Like
    There are some drawbacks to one piece doors. They are nice in areas where they can work.
    I cold/snow country I think one has to heat the slab outside the door a bit to insure snow/ice does not block it from opening for first few feet of operation? And in snow country where the roof snow load is heavy, one has to beef up the structure to handle the one piece door. Hanging out there requires the load to be carried inside the structure.
    Have never had one, but have seen the added structure to install one, far more than basic biflold type in winter country.
    Benefit is they are clear opening, so not much lost space for clear height. But they do take more area to clear to open, and not great for partial opening until up high enough to walk under. Scare me a bit walking under them when open.
    I have been planning a new hangar and just saw the Schweiss hyd door that is a tri leg free standing system, not attached to the main structure. Has its own footing to set the support frame on, so no stress /beef up required on the building. Good for retrofit too.
    Have asked for costs, but sure looks like a nice option and good looking hinge system. Could feel better under one of those.
    John
    Last edited by john schwamm; 06-08-2019 at 08:24 PM.
    Likes Hardtailjohn liked this post

  25. #25
    WWhunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Laporte, Minnesota and the white sandy beaches of NW Florida
    Posts
    1,436
    Post Thanks / Like
    When I built mine, I did as many have suggested. I drew a diagram with everything in it that I owned at the time. Couple of collector cars, airplane, tractors, etc. I then doubled it. You guessed it...NOT big enough. Seems like a guy is alwys accumulating more 'stuff'. I currently have the cars, 3 planes (only one with the wings on and flyable) tractor, skidsteer and a bunch of other items in it. I wish I had built it 3 times what I was expecting. Maybe better if I just sell some crap!!

  26. #26
    Bill.Brine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    420
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by skywagon8a View Post
    60 wide would be a minimum for two or three planes. My hangar is 70 wide and I can put two float planes in there backed into corners without moving the other one to get either one out. Any less, it would require a lot of maneuvering. 50 wide would mean moving the one in front to get at the back one.
    Wheel planes cannot fly from your hangar!
    Pete’s shop is awesome.


    Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org mobile app

  27. #27
    JCM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3
    Post Thanks / Like
    We’ve been trying to decide which way to configure a new hangar to handle two Cubs ourselves. What I do know is that the last two years I’ve shared a 60’ X 50’ hangar ( 55’ door) with a 182. It just didn’t work without moving one out first. Granted, the hangar had a bathroom built in a rear corner so one aircraft couldn’t quite get tucked as far back as the other. The door width wasn’t a problem, it was avoiding touching wing tips and also watching those tapered steel trusses with the other wing. I’ve played with a few computer models and decided if we were to have one door it would take a 72’X 50’ hangar. (3600 sq’). I then looked at a 55’ X50’ hangar with two doors. (2750 sq’) Depending on your price per square foot to build, 850sq’ less would buy another $11K door and money left over. Having both aircraft tail to tail also gives you plenty of wall space for stuff where the single door option uses more sq footage for maneuvering.

    Just pondering!

    I would also appreciate anyone sharing what it’s costing per square foot to reach your finished product.

    Jim

  28. #28

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Posts
    890
    Post Thanks / Like
    My hangar was 40 X 40 with 12 or 14-foot opening, held SC on floats on dolly, Champ and 185 on wheels, faced south right on the coast, didn't need a door. Used 185 wheels/skis at the front during winter, no rash no problems.

  29. #29
    Hardtailjohn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Marion, MT
    Posts
    695
    Post Thanks / Like
    I'm 60x60x16 with a 50x14 HiFold door as well as a 20x60 lean-to shop on one side, connected on one hangar and 60x50 with a 50x14 Schweiss on the other. l'll go 100' square next time.... it's NEVER big enough!!!! My hangar in WA was 50x50 with a 12x50 lean-to on the back and I was constantly having to move every airplane to move one...huge pain in the butt!!!
    John

  30. #30

    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Canyon, tx
    Posts
    389
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by flynlow View Post
    My 50x60 has single piece powerlift doors in both ends. Its nice not to have to move the Cub to get my combine, truck, boat, spracoupe, or racecar outt


    Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org
    Might as well sell the combine. It’s the only thing that makes money
    Likes flynlow liked this post

  31. #31

    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    178
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by john schwamm View Post
    There are some drawbacks to one piece doors. They are nice in areas where they can work.
    I cold/snow country I think one has to heat the slab outside the door a bit to insure snow/ice does not block it from opening for first few feet of operation? And in snow country where the roof snow load is heavy, one has to beef up the structure to handle the one piece door. Hanging out there requires the load to be carried inside the structure.
    Have never had one, but have seen the added structure to install one, far more than basic biflold type in winter country.
    Benefit is they are clear opening, so not much lost space for clear height. But they do take more area to clear to open, and not great for partial opening until up high enough to walk under. Scare me a bit walking under them when open.
    I have been planning a new hangar and just saw the Schweiss hyd door that is a tri leg free standing system, not attached to the main structure. Has its own footing to set the support frame on, so no stress /beef up required on the building. Good for retrofit too.
    Have asked for costs, but sure looks like a nice option and good looking hinge system. Could feel better under one of those.
    John
    A note about the Higher Power doors... They go straight up for the first foot, thus avoiding most snow/ice issues. They are balanced, so they need no additional structure. You can retrofit a wood building. Yes, you do need some clear space inside your building for 1/2 the height of the door. They only take up their thickness in the rough opening, but you do need another foot above that for the first vertical 12" rise. (It's actually only 8" on the smaller doors I think). A 12 volt battery will operate them. I have one in Alaska (18' x 55' clear when open) and so far it has worked very well.
    Likes Hardtailjohn liked this post

  32. #32

    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    4,540
    Post Thanks / Like

    Suggestions on hangar size

    You could park a pickup in front of my one-piece Schweiss and I'd wager the door would move the truck. With southern exposure snow melts back from the door even in the cold months so not a problem for me. The vacuum created by tightly sealed 50x14 door opening in a tightly sealed hangar is impressive. Its mandatory to open a man door to allow pressure to equalize in the initial stages of opening or final stages of closing. Schweiss structural requirements eliminate any concern for snow load deflection. I've been in the door business all my life and while my Schweiss is my first go with a hangar door? I'm thoroughly impressed.

    My hangar is 60x55 and I'm not cramped for space but I wouldn't want to give any of it up. Hangar square footage is like horsepower. More is better.

    GoJacks allow you to move planes sideways. Very handy for doing the hangar floor jigsaw puzzle routine.

    I find it interesting that the majority of hangar doors on my notoriously windy airport are one piece hydraulics. I have no worry about my door opening in any winds I'd expose the hangar interior to. I presume the popularity of one piece has to do with how they seal up to combat wind, dust, and cold weather. Mine does a very good job.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_5328.JPG 
Views:	84 
Size:	153.3 KB 
ID:	43225
    Last edited by stewartb; 06-09-2019 at 10:09 AM.
    Likes jrussl liked this post

  33. #33

    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Canyon, tx
    Posts
    389
    Post Thanks / Like
    Biggest pro of a one piece door for me is the awning/shade it provides especially in a hot climate. You lose about 4’ of that with a Higher Power door because of the cam system.

  34. #34
    Eddie Foy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    3,404
    Post Thanks / Like
    Actually it is 5' 4" on a 14 ft door. Still leaves me with a 8' 8" ft awning on a 14 ft door. I can live with that.

    Quote Originally Posted by KevinJ View Post
    Biggest pro of a one piece door for me is the awning/shade it provides especially in a hot climate. You lose about 4’ of that with a Higher Power door because of the cam system.
    Last edited by Eddie Foy; 06-09-2019 at 01:04 PM.
    "Put out my hand and touched the face of God!"
    Thanks KevinJ thanked for this post

  35. #35

    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    4,540
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie Foy View Post
    Actually it is 5' 4" on a 14 ft door. Still leaves me with a 8' 6" ft awning on a 14 ft door. I can live with that.
    FWIW. My 180 on 29s has the tail beacon at 8'3" off the floor and the 86" prop tip when upright? 10' even.

  36. #36
    Eddie Foy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    3,404
    Post Thanks / Like
    A 14 ft Higher Power door gives you 14 Ft of clearance. Wasn't talking about head room.
    Quote Originally Posted by stewartb View Post
    FWIW. My 180 on 29s has the tail beacon at 8'3" off the floor and the 86" prop tip when upright? 10' even.
    "Put out my hand and touched the face of God!"

  37. #37

    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    4,540
    Post Thanks / Like
    So what do the numbers you posted refer to? I don't know diddley about Higher Power doors.

  38. #38
    Eddie Foy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    3,404
    Post Thanks / Like
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	E23D1BE3-5E63-4D6F-AD4C-C3CD72B41C52.png 
Views:	132 
Size:	218.4 KB 
ID:	43226


    Quote Originally Posted by stewartb View Post
    So what do the numbers you posted refer to? I don't know diddley about Higher Power doors.
    "Put out my hand and touched the face of God!"
    Likes Hardtailjohn liked this post

  39. #39

    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    4,540
    Post Thanks / Like
    Ok, the sticky-outie length. I get it now.

    That's an interesting system and a good idea for lots of applications. I'm pleased with mine. Two hydraulic rams and some hinges. Works great. I wonder how the two systems compare in price?
    Last edited by stewartb; 06-09-2019 at 01:30 PM.

  40. #40
    Gordon Misch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Toledo, Wa (KTDO)
    Posts
    3,325
    Post Thanks / Like
    I have a 12 x 40 Higher Power door. My opinion is that it is very well engineered. On my particular door however, the quality control wasn't what I would expect. It came two feet too wide, but they did pay for the modifications - no reluctance whatsoever. Main structural members (box tubing) were pieced together and not as straight as they should have been. As assembled, it didn't lie quite in a plane, but some shimming at bolted connections resolved that issue. Operationally and for relative ease of installation (I did it by myself, no help at all), I like it a lot.
    Gordon

    N4328M KTDO
    My SPOT: tinyurl.com/N4328M (case sensitive)
    Likes Hardtailjohn liked this post

Similar Threads

  1. Remodeling a Hangar: Suggestions Requested
    By WindOnHisNose in forum Cafe Supercub
    Replies: 143
    Last Post: 01-10-2019, 08:14 AM
  2. Simple Hangar Contruction Hangar to house Cub.
    By Fatchanceair in forum Cafe Supercub
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 12-01-2016, 10:46 AM
  3. Help, need suggestions.......
    By CptKelly in forum Cafe Supercub
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-07-2004, 01:05 PM

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •