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Thread: Iliamna mystery creature

  1. #1

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    Iliamna mystery creature

    c. 1997 https://www.sfgate.com/sports/articl...ad-3129401.php
    c. 2017 https://www.adn.com/outdoors-adventu...new-sightings/

    Am wondering if any of our current pilots in that area might weigh in on this mysterious creature!

    Last edited by JohnnyR; 02-22-2019 at 05:20 PM.
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  2. #2
    Dave Calkins's Avatar
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    capsized trimaran boat?
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    mvivion's Avatar
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    Those stories been around since before I was on the Peninsula in late 70s. A close relative of Nessie.

    MTV
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    It is the legendary Photoshopus Tothemaximus!!!!

  5. #5
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
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    Sturgeon with their tall tail fin? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sturgeon Can do fresh and salt water and some grow over 20' in length.

    But wait...there's more! https://www.adn.com/science/article/...rk/2012/05/03/

    I'll believe it when there's one stuck on a stick cooking next to a beach fire.

    Gary
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by BC12D-4-85; 02-22-2019 at 11:34 PM.
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    mvivion's Avatar
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    Gary,

    Possibility, but suspect more likely the rather rare “Turbo Sturgeon”.......

    MTV
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    A handful of Pike and some really good weed.
    Last edited by stewartb; 02-24-2019 at 08:16 AM.

  8. #8
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
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    They're widely distributed in North America but a more likely source nearby would be Eastern Asia. When sea levels rose in Beringia during the early Holocene era 20K to present (watch: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/F...ge-noaagov.gif) fish distributed to formerly tough habitat. Some came from Eurasia others from northern Canada after melting of the Cordilleran and Laurentide ice sheets. Bristol Bay drainages were easily accessible.

    Now if they're in fact Sturgeon what species is an open question. Several are found nearby and sizes vary. Here's John Schandelmeier's recent story: https://www.adn.com/outdoors-adventu...new-sightings/ There's nothing quite like the big one that got away. Just got to use the right gear.

    Gary

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    mvivion's Avatar
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    And, for those that don’t know Gary, he’s a retired Alaska Department of Fish and Game fisheries biologist. So, he should know...

    MTV
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    Thanks, Gary. I read that article and am still confuzzled as to why something substantive hasn't materialized after all these years. Sounds like recent folks weren't spinning stories.
    Quote Originally Posted by BC12D-4-85 View Post
    They're widely distributed in North America but a more likely source nearby would be Eastern Asia. When sea levels rose in Beringia during the early Holocene era 20K to present (watch: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/F...ge-noaagov.gif) fish distributed to formerly tough habitat. Some came from Eurasia others from northern Canada after melting of the Cordilleran and Laurentide ice sheets. Bristol Bay drainages were easily accessible.

    Now if they're in fact Sturgeon what species is an open question. Several are found nearby and sizes vary. Here's John Schandelmeier's recent story: https://www.adn.com/outdoors-adventu...new-sightings/ There's nothing quite like the big one that got away. Just got to use the right gear.

    Gary

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tennessee View Post
    It is the legendary Photoshopus Tothemaximus!!!!
    By the way, that picture was/is a painting!

  12. #12
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
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    It might make for a good adventure to look for them. I should ask Ron Aaberg from Pedro Bay about this. I used to visit with him on ham radio eves and he flew and fished that country for years. Had a PA-11 as I recall.

    The lake's deep (~300m/988') but with the all the fish food seasonally available nearshore they'd likely be nearby on them or their eggs. I spent part of a few summers there but didn't get to boat around much. Just flying supervisors to lodges for show and tell or netting Char for the hatchery. Truly nice country there and Wood River/Tikchik lake complex NW.

    Gary
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    Yes, it is nice country.
    I'd like to meet Mr. Aaberg, as I've wanted to fly in to Pedro Bay for some time now. Didn't want to bother folks without an actual reason to be there.
    There are a number of Iliamna lodges and properties for sale now, presumably because of the looming threat of Pebble mine. Get out while the getting's good, I suppose...


    Quote Originally Posted by BC12D-4-85 View Post
    It might make for a good adventure to look for them. I should ask Ron Aaberg from Pedro Bay about this. I used to visit with him on ham radio eves and he flew and fished that country for years. Had a PA-11 as I recall.

    The lake's deep (~300m/988') but with the all the fish food seasonally available nearshore they'd likely be nearby on them or their eggs. I spent part of a few summers there but didn't get to boat around much. Just flying supervisors to lodges for show and tell or netting Char for the hatchery. Truly nice country there and Wood River/Tikchik lake complex NW.

    Gary

  14. #14
    PerryB's Avatar
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    It's another one of those things that has supposedly been seen, but never any solid evidence. Kind of like my accountant.
    After Monday and Tuesday, even the calendar says WTF !
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    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
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    I think a modern towed sonar array or autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV big file: http://www.sf.adfg.state.ak.us/fedaidpdfs/FDS13-39.pdf) would help look if a fisher had the time and inclination. Oh yea and money. Probably would take some TV short series to set it up unless someone was both bored and curious at the same time.

    Bait on the bottom (whatever experienced sturgeon catchers use like accountant parts) or suspended from 55 gallon drums free floating with GPS trackers. Like jug fishing for burbot and whatever but on a bigger scale. Line them up and wait for one or more to move as the observer enjoys a beverage.

    Another way would be to attach a sonic transmitter tag to the bait and then follow the fish after they swallow it. Done that with external radio transmitter tags quite a bit but maybe too deep for that RF tech.

    Gary

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    When they sonar the bottom of a lake , river or ocean, why don't they call that 'bottomography'?

  17. #17
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HalfTonChamp View Post
    When they sonar the bottom of a lake , river or ocean, why don't they call that 'bottomography'?
    Could do that but bathymetry was used so I guess it stuck. Like got thrown against the wall and stuck. Sometimes it's the water below and what's in it like fish that's more of interest than just the bottom.

    Seals in Iliamna are interesting. Apparently do what seals do in winter...hide. Can't be much for sharks around with all that for snacks:
    http://www.clearwaterair.com/portals...mna-frozen.pdf
    http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...rticles_id=553

    Monsters? Ask the locals that have lived there for centuries would be my first choice.

    Gary

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    Gordon Misch's Avatar
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    So Gary, you ruthlessly forced me to go out without cabin heat to get some measurements, so now I'll say you should research this definitively. It's a biologist's imperative.
    Gordon

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    My SPOT: tinyurl.com/N4328M (case sensitive)

  19. #19
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
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    Yes but I'm no longer one of them guys and gals...I have to eat canned tuna and frozen fish sticks like everyone. The seals would pose a problem for baited hooks at certain times. Catch one and these folks would park and set up living in someone's back door: https://www.biologicaldiversity.org/...eal/index.html

    Bathymetry would have to be able to separate the seals from other mysterious big deals near the bottom, but I suspect in real deep water they'd not be found if migrating rainbows, steelhead, or salmon were around during that time. Still Gordon winter would be a fun time to explore. Set up some winch and baited lines and go do some serious ice fishing with a fathometer/fish finder for help. It works good for that.

    Sorry about the no-heat for science experiment. I'd have Dawley partition the Sutton muffler, add a second inlet and outlet, then pull carb heat off one part. That puny external heat robber was doomed from the start.

    Gary
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    TurboBeaver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HalfTonChamp View Post
    When they sonar the bottom of a lake , river or ocean, why don't they call that 'bottomography'?
    Would this be a prime example of "bottomography" 1/2 Ton ????Click image for larger version. 

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    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
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    Lower units require maintenance. Inspect and report.

    Gary

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    TurboBeaver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BC12D-4-85 View Post
    Lower units require maintenance. Inspect and report.

    Gary
    Roger that!

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    Trig Olson Origonal Ilamina air taxi owner Carved out a set of big foot tracks they strapped them on and walked around Iliama lake . News paper got ahold of it was a hell of a bunch of people and articles about big foot showing up at Ilamna lake. another subject The picture of the fins look like a fake ,just like Trigs big foot tracks around the 1960s.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BC12D-4-85 View Post
    Lower units require maintenance. Inspect and report.

    Gary
    … borescope...

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    algonquin's Avatar
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    For those with inquiring minds research the deserted village on the bottom of the Kenai Penn. The people all packed up and left and were afraid to tell stories about it. The key is Portlock. I'm not saying anything else.

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    When one sees the fresh water seals in Iliamna, the Iliamna monster cannot be far behind them.
    John

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    Quote Originally Posted by algonquin View Post
    For those with inquiring minds research the deserted village on the bottom of the Kenai Penn. The people all packed up and left and were afraid to tell stories about it. The key is Portlock. I'm not saying anything else.
    Yeah, but that postmaster was a courageous soul!

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    cubdriver2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by algonquin View Post
    For those with inquiring minds research the deserted village on the bottom of the Kenai Penn. The people all packed up and left and were afraid to tell stories about it. The key is Portlock. I'm not saying anything else.
    What did I miss? I flew Stu's J3 around the point from Nuka Island South and back around to Seldovia at about a 1000'

    Glenn
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    N1PA

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Hayes View Post
    Trig Olson Origonal Ilamina air taxi owner Carved out a set of big foot tracks they strapped them on and walked around Iliama lake . News paper got ahold of it was a hell of a bunch of people and articles about big foot showing up at Ilamna lake. another subject The picture of the fins look like a fake ,just like Trigs big foot tracks around the 1960s.
    Welcome Ron!
    Really great to have you onboard!
    For those not firmilar , Ron is an old time guide from Alaska that dates back to early Polar Bear days! His
    experence flying bush planes would put him at the very top of the list worldwide. He is literally a " Living Legend" in the hunting guiding community. The last of the "real deal"
    Of early Alaskan Bush Pilots.
    Nice to someone of your vast experience on the SC site. Hope to see more of your posts here in the future!

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    algonquin's Avatar
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    Glen, many of the people settled in English Bay, now Nanwalic.(sp)

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    cubdriver2's Avatar
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    There is a really cool tidal boiling swirl a couple miles offshore just South of there.

    Glenn
    "Optimism is going after Moby Dick in a rowboat and taking the tartar sauce with you!"

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    algonquin's Avatar
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    When I was guiding in that area got to see some really strange things. Once while trolling for Salmon a standing wave came up 6' or so off a point and was trying to pull us in backwards, cannon balls were almost straight back. You've seen the tides, hard to explain to people unless they have seen it. Are you coming up this summer?

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    skywagon8a's Avatar
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    Standing waves can be scary even when flying over them. You should see some of them that show up between Nantucket and Monomoy Point. They are so high that when flying over them at 1000 feet it feels as though they will hit you. It's hard to believe that a wall of water can just stand up at what appears to be well over 100 feet without falling down.
    N1PA

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    algonquin's Avatar
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    The really big tides run around 27', but very common for them to be 20'. Less than 5' is a good fishing tide for Halibut.

  36. #36
    algonquin's Avatar
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    Just thinking back when I deck handed on a 36' single engine commercial boat that cruised at 7-9kts. , had to plan on leaving and returning with the tide.

  37. #37
    cubdriver2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by algonquin View Post
    The really big tides run around 27', but very common for them to be 20'. Less than 5' is a good fishing tide for Halibut.
    I thought when we were there the tide swing was at 29'?

    Glenn
    Last edited by cubdriver2; 05-02-2019 at 08:26 AM.
    "Optimism is going after Moby Dick in a rowboat and taking the tartar sauce with you!"

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    Quote Originally Posted by TurboBeaver View Post
    Would this be a prime example of "bottomography" 1/2 Ton ????Click image for larger version. 

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    No, TurboBeaver, if that is your real name. This is a mirage. A fairly common phenomenon occurring when searchers begin to see things they are 'hoping' to find.
    This one in particular could be caused by years of marriage and drinking saltwater. You're fortunate. Some people see hairy apes.
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  39. #39
    Paul Persinger Jr.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by john schwamm View Post
    When one sees the fresh water seals in Iliamna, the Iliamna monster cannot be far behind them.
    John
    I was flying along at a few hundred feet and saw my first Iliamna seal. Didn’t know they were there, it’ll get your attention!


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  40. #40
    algonquin's Avatar
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    I've seen it there in the big tides in the winter, but the seawall rocks are under water then or just about under.

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