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Thread: Blow Hard, but quiet!

  1. #1
    aktango58's Avatar
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    Blow Hard, but quiet!

    Got your attention?

    Air compressor. Thoughts?

    I have a semi-old one, 15 years or so, of the typical two cylinder upright ones that are louder than a Hughey overhead in lifting a load. Not anything special, but has done it's job for the time I have had it.

    With the new hangar coming together, I am looking at long term solutions for some things, compressed air is one. I don't see nor plan to have a commercial repair shop happening, but yet I do see working on my plane, maybe building a plane at some point, and I do have a few "tools" that require maintenance and repair. Though I have battery operated impacts, there are times when the 1" impact gun must come out to tear into a problem.

    Wallmart and Harbor Freight compressors are what you expect. Work for a time, maybe forever, but usually are loud. Volume is ok for most uses in my experience, but if you really get going or sand blasting it takes some time to let them build air.

    What do you guys use? Is it worth buying the big tank IR models? What about the turbine ones, they seem quiet?

    I have a plan to put the compressor up high on a shelf in the front of the hangar with some sound proofing, I really hate having to shout over the compressors

    Thanks for the ideas and opinions

    George
    I don't know where you've been me lad, but I see you won first Prize!

  2. #2
    www.SkupTech.com mike mcs repair's Avatar
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    put it outside in a room... nice and quiet

    might need a small heater/pad

  3. #3
    jrussl's Avatar
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    I bought this one in 2012 and really like it. Pretty darn quiet but not silent. For what I use it for, it recovers pretty quickly so is off most of the time. The exception is my bead blast cabinet but then my shopvac is screaming so loud I can’t hear the compressor.

    https://www.aircompressorsdirect.com...ssor/p705.html


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  4. #4
    CenterHillAg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike mcs repair View Post
    put it outside in a room... nice and quiet

    might need a small heater/pad
    A buddy’s shop is set up like this, it’s an old Navion factory actually. Some gigantic air compressor in a insulated room connected to the shop. All you hear is a hum when it kicks on.

  5. #5
    Cub junkie's Avatar
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    I have a Quincy very similar to the IR in post #3. Two stage 230v is a buy once, cry once deal. You won't regret buying a good one but will if you get an undersized one.
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  6. #6

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    I have big industrial compressers in my shop. We just build simple plywood enclosures around them. Full doors for easy draining and service. Most of the noise is contained.
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  7. #7
    cubdriver2's Avatar
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    Buy CFM, not PSI. Buy all the CFM you can afford

    Glenn
    "Optimism is going after Moby Dick in a rowboat and taking the tartar sauce with you!"

  8. #8

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    Look around and find the biggest volume tank you can or even two two of them. I found one at salvage yard for free, it was 5 ft tall. I put it in line with a small pancake airless compressor I could swap tires /paint all day long. Cutoff saw would drain it down after a while. I now have the large two stage compressor and tank in my shop but also have a 8ft tall volume tank I am going to put in line.
    DENNY
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  9. #9

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    I did a lot of online research when I was searching for a small portable compressor to carry in our RV. Since it's primarily used to air up the tires before leaving a camping spot, I didn't want to get my neighbors all riled up every time I turned it on. The lowest-volume compressors I could find came from California Air Tools. I purchased the 2010A, a 1HP portable unit with a 2 gal tank, so it's not really up to "shop work" volumes (3.1 CFM @ 40 psi, 2.2 CFM @ 90 psi). But it is amazingly quiet – only 60 dB when running. You can hold a conversation at normal voice levels while standing over it with it operating full blast. Apparently, a lot of folks who are airbrush artists us it in their studios...

    Their highest-volume model (60040CAD) puts out 12.8 CFM @ 40 psi, or 10.6 CFM @ 90 psi (albeit while only producing 75 dB of noise), which would be perfectly fine for my home shop, but might not be enough for a larger shop. I currently have an old Craftsman 60 gallon compressor (roughly same output as the 60040CAD), and it makes enough noise to wake the dead. It's incredibly loud when it's running - you cannot even shout and be heard over it within 20 feet of it... I put it on the "porch" outside my shop (12-foot overhang). Seriously, being around it for any amount of time requires hearing protection!

    I was hoping Santa would bring me the 60040CAD for Christmas, but that didn't happen, so I might just have to buy it myself...
    Jim Parker
    '65 Champion 7ECA - Flying
    ?? Bearhawk Patrol - Building

  10. #10

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    Mine's in a separate room above the shop's bathroom. So the noise it makes is tolerable, but it's still at shop temps. If I lived in a temperate climate I would have just put it in a outside shed. 85 gallon tank and no leaks, once it cycles off I valve off at the regulator (to forestall any minor leaks possibly in the supply system throughout the shop) and for a couple weeks afterwards have plenty of air for minor tasks without having to start the the entire system. From zero pressure to shutoff, 140 lbs., it takes several minutes, and if I just to blow up a bike tire, I can do that weeks later if I remember to shut off the supply ball valve. One thing I have put off buy for years but could use, is a portable air tank.
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  11. #11
    gdafoe's Avatar
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    George, I have just been through this, replacing a really good shop compressor that served me very well for 30+ years. I was an Ingersol Rand with an 80-gallon tank. The compressor failed and I looked at complete new units but after a fair bit of research I bought a replacement Ingersol Rand air pump and installed it on the original system. I cost like $550. That was a bad idea in the end. The new unit was louder than the original and it ran very very hot and didn't provide the volume that the original did even though it was rated about the same. After 1 1/2 years then the motor failed. So back to the drawing board. The cost to make that motor work and already having bought a bad air pump and being in the middle of a big project for which I really needed air. I decided I'd better replace everything. Back the researching. I ended up ordering a new one from Lowe's of all places because they had the one I wanted and they could deliver it the quickest. It was dropped off the truck and ruined when it got to the store so the quick delivery didn't work out so well. I finally got it after the big project was done. I think it is the best compressor unit that I have ever used. It is quieter than any I have had. The air volume is better than any I have had. It is built by a company in Illinois as I recall and sold under several brands. This one is a DeWalt DXCMV5048055. Specs are amazing and seem to be correct. Notice it is rated at 17 cubic ft at 175 lbs. If you look at compressors they may be rated at a high volume but lower pressure. Be careful when looking this one up as they seem to post pictures of other units with pictures of this one. Also, the price varies a lot you can find them for about what I initially paid. I paid like $1450 when I ordered it but then they gave me a big discount when they drop the ball - - I mean the compressor. I have used this now for about a year it is great it will actually keep up to my cabinet sandblaster and it uses a lot of air. I am still surprised at how much quieter it is. It is in the corner of a 40x60 hangar with no other protection around it. By the way, the big IR compressors that I have looked at in stores have the same bad air pump that I bought to fix my old system. IR is not what it was in the past.
    Weight (lbs.) 467
    Fitting Size 1/4-in
    Air Delivery SCFM @ 90PSI (CFM) 0
    Air Delivery SCFM @ 100PSI (CFM) 17.9
    Air Delivery SCFM @ 175PSI (CFM) 17
    Maximum Pressure PSI 175
    Portable No[COLOR=#5D5D5D !important][/COLOR]
    Decibel Rating (Decibels) 83
    Last edited by gdafoe; 01-25-2019 at 11:33 AM.
    Gerald
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  12. #12
    Farmboy's Avatar
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    Mine is either the same or very similar to Joe’s link above. Got it from Tractor Supply I believe. I wouldn’t say it’s quiet at all, as I did put it in a room that I now call the “compressor room”. But, coming from smaller portable units it provides much better service. It feeds 3/4” pex lines to both ends of the shop, and while it cycles more than I prefer for heavy sanding/sandblasting I’ve never run out of air.
    Multi stage with an air dryer is ideal, as in my opinion the small inline dryers are all worthless, but I’ve not found a better option.
    I installed a drain line and a nice ball valve to the bottom outlet and religiously drain the water out. If you don’t you’ll be amazed when you blow 2-3 gallons of water into your dump pail.
    Like others, a good lever valve on the outlet is a must to keep it from cycling overnight, protect from blown lines while away, and maintain pressure.
    If the compressor room is small, good air flow is needed to keep temps down as much as up. When it’s running a lot it will heat up a former office space quite a lot.


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  13. #13
    aktango58's Avatar
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    Thank you all for the input.

    A couple of things- living where I do with the temperature swings and having a new building, the cost and trouble with a "compressor house" attachment, keeping it warm in winter, cost to attach, plowing snow around it and such, I have ruled out that option. For the cost and hassle of such a thing I can afford to buy that much nicer compressor. I do like the idea of enclosing it for sound, but will need access.

    As all in Alaska, floor space is expensive. My plan is to put the compressor up near the celling near the big door where it is out of the way moving planes.

    I like the desalt, great option. Hope to find one with a horizontal tank though, or maybe cut the compressor section off and set the tank beside.... thinking here.
    I don't know where you've been me lad, but I see you won first Prize!
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  14. #14
    Bill.Brine's Avatar
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    George,
    What are you thinking about using for distribution lines?
    Lots of choices.
    I have used plastic pex like stuff, black iron, aluminum and copper. Aluminum was the best but $$. Rigid plastic scared me. Copper looked good but $$$$$. Pex was cheap but filled with water. Iron rusted inside out.
    Lots to think about in designing the system too.Drains for water are often overlooked.
    Now I just have a small portable California Air systems unit with a 50' rubber hose- super quiet but only good for very, very small jobs.
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  15. #15

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    I bought a Home depot, Husky brand, 60 gallon, 220v, unit several years ago, around $500, I've been happy with it especially for the price point, has enough value to run my pot blaster, spray gun and orbital sanders, so far its done a 72 Ford 1/2 ton restoration and 2 -pa12's and its going great....
    Staying alive in an airplane has a lot more to do with mastering ourselves than mastering the aircraft.
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    Look at Screw Compressors, IR makes one. You can stand right next to one when it is running and have a conversation without yelling. Not cheap, but well worth the cost.
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  17. #17

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    The IR screw compressors are nice. Almost instant air and quiet.
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    I have several big compressors at work. The best one is about 50+ years old. I've had it for 30. It's a two cylinder low RPM belt-driven machine and it keeps on working day after day, year after year. It's way quieter and more dependable than it's more modern counterparts. Sometimes modern isn't better.

    FWIW, my current shop is about 20 years old. Distribution lines are black iron pipe. The compressors are on 10+ hours a day at 120# of line pressure. The main lines are overhead and the drops are done with pipe tees and bell reducers so any line moisture falls out at the lines. I've never had a failure of any kind in the pipe or fittings. I have a dryer rigged that I can connect at any line for painting.
    Last edited by stewartb; 01-26-2019 at 10:27 AM.
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  19. #19
    aktango58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stewartb View Post
    I have several big compressors at work. The best one is about 50+ years old. I've had it for 30. It's a two cylinder low RPM belt-driven machine and it keeps on working day after day, year after year. It's way quieter and more dependable than it's more modern counterparts. Sometimes modern isn't better.

    FWIW, my current shop is about 20 years old. Distribution lines are black iron pipe. The compressors are on 10+ hours a day at 120# of line pressure. The main lines are overhead and the drops are done with pipe tees and bell reducers so any line moisture falls out at the lines. I've never had a failure of any kind in the pipe or fittings. I have a dryer rigged that I can connect at any line for painting.
    You hit upon one of the thoughts in the back of my mind. Look around for an older compressor. Even if it is 3 phase, change the motor. Lathes and Mills have the same situation- WWII built steel seems to be stronger with less play than ten year old stuff!
    I don't know where you've been me lad, but I see you won first Prize!
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    CenterHillAg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stewartb View Post
    I have several big compressors at work. The best one is about 50+ years old. I've had it for 30. It's a two cylinder low RPM belt-driven machine and it keeps on working day after day, year after year. It's way quieter and more dependable than it's more modern counterparts. Sometimes modern isn't better.
    We have a 50 yr old Ingersoll Rand that just wont die. It’s probably never had more maintenance than the oil being topped off and the moisture drain opened every few years, yet it starts every time you flip the breaker.
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  21. #21

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    One option is to build your own, an old propane tank is a good place to start. Then add compressor and motor of choice. My 80 gallon tank (50 years old) had a hole rust in it, fetched me up a 250 gallon propane tank and replaced it.

    One other thing that gets overlooked is the air filter, they would last longer with a good filter. The dust the we fight while painting is the same dust that shortens the compressor life.

  22. #22
    cubdriver2's Avatar
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    Back in 1981 when we bought this place and I didn't have 2 nickels to rub together to make a spark I had a 5 hp electric barn cleaner motor that a farmer had thrown away. I got it working by cleaning the contacts, I also had a air brake compressor off of a big rig truck. I was in the scrap yard one day and found a 80 gl tank that had a rust hole in one end and bought it for 10 cents a pound. Took it home and cut out the rusty spot and welded on a patch. By the time I got done I had about $60 in it with belts and a pressure switch. I think on a truck it ran around 1800 rpm but it was over 2500rpm on my compressor. boy did that make quick air. It's still going up at my neighbors farm shop working everyday.

    Glenn
    "Optimism is going after Moby Dick in a rowboat and taking the tartar sauce with you!"
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  23. #23
    cubdriver2's Avatar
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    I got a deal for you George. I got this monster about 20 years ago, it was in the Amtrak maintenance building and Rube Goldberged together. Its about 75 CFM best I can tell. 4 cyl and makes more noise then a T6 taking off in you kitchen. OSHA for some reason made them get rid of it Right Now. I happened to be in the right place and removed it for free. Right compressor crank broke one day because it got bent 30+ years ago. I have a spare crank for it. We had a party in my hangar years ago and my bud Nic and Island Bob's nephew Dukie went to the garage to fill there air mattresses. They decided to sleep in the garage because the collage kids were still parting making too much noise in the hangar. The compressor had a tink, tiny leak. At about 3am it decided it was time to fill the tank. I was in bed across the road and heard it start. Great fun those old compressors.



    Keep looking, I got this one for $325 when a body shop closed




    Glenn
    "Optimism is going after Moby Dick in a rowboat and taking the tartar sauce with you!"

  24. #24
    aktango58's Avatar
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    so for $400 you will sell me both, including delivery?
    I don't know where you've been me lad, but I see you won first Prize!

  25. #25
    Hardtailjohn's Avatar
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    I run 2 smaller ones. Learned the hard way that when you have one compressor and it fails in the middle of a paint job, you're screwed. If you have 2 smaller ones, you can at least limp through to the end of the cup of that $300 a gallon paint and not get to pour it in the trash.
    John

  26. #26
    cubdriver2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aktango58 View Post
    so for $400 you will sell me both, including delivery?
    I thought you owned a Maule?

    Glenn
    "Optimism is going after Moby Dick in a rowboat and taking the tartar sauce with you!"

  27. #27
    aktango58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cubdriver2 View Post
    I thought you owned a Maule?

    Glenn
    I do. Ever wonder why the have four tanks?
    I don't know where you've been me lad, but I see you won first Prize!

  28. #28
    cubdriver2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aktango58 View Post
    I do. Ever wonder why the have four tanks?
    No

    Glenn
    "Optimism is going after Moby Dick in a rowboat and taking the tartar sauce with you!"

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