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Thread: You Can Always Go Around

  1. #1
    WindOnHisNose's Avatar
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    You Can Always Go Around

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  2. #2
    SJ's Avatar
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    I know a guy who spent about four month's in physical rehab that would argue that you can't always go around...

    sj
    "Often Mistaken, but Never in Doubt"
    ------------------------------------------
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  3. #3
    WindOnHisNose's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SJ View Post
    I know a guy who spent about four month's in physical rehab that would argue that you can't always go around...

    sj
    I get your point, but would argue that a major part of going around is being set up to be able to go around. Out West, of course, some of the strips are clearly one way in, one way out.

    rsc

  4. #4
    WindOnHisNose's Avatar
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    I don't do a lot of mountain flying, so am pretty quick to decide to go around.

    I would like to read some of you folks thoughts on setting up for an approach to a short, challenging airstrip that would optimize the chance for a successful go-around.

    Thanks!

    rsc

  5. #5
    PerryB's Avatar
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    1) A powered, relatively flat approach so you don't have to overcome a high sink rate.
    2) A hard no-go point at which you abort.
    After Monday and Tuesday, even the calendar says WTF !
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  6. #6
    hotrod180's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PerryB View Post
    A powered, relatively flat approach so you don't have to overcome a high sink rate. …..
    Good if you have to go-around, but bad in the case of an engine failure or even sputter.
    Cessna Skywagon-- accept no substitute!
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  7. #7

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    Several points to talk about on this topic.
    This will be for you basic cub and a strip that is not a hard one way strip. The first thing to set up is you slow flight skills. Go up to 3-5 grand AGL and set the plane up in landing configuration for me full nose up, full flaps. Now start pulling power back until you are about 5mph above stall speed and adjust RPM for level flight 1,800-2000 RPM. Now fly around for a bit, do this several times (5 or more flights) until you are very comfortable at slow flight including turns. Next go down to a long runway and and practice flying low and slow down the whole runway landing at the end. Now practice low power takeoffs say at 2,200 RPM, adjust to runway as needed. If you do get a chance go out into some open country with no wires, towers, etc to worry about and just play at 2000 rpm getting a good feel for the plane down low trimmed, full flaps. Practice you canyon turns so you can do it with only 300 ft loss. Learn to do a 200 ft pattern, this will come in handy when the fluffy stuff is low.
    The skill set above will allow you make that OH CRAP go around into just another simple low power turn and climb over a ridge. We all have the full power go around training that is often not needed or helpful. If you do a power on approach 1200-1600 it only takes a RPM of 2,000 to stop decent and start climbing. Just put in some power as needed to clear the trees or whatever is at the end of the runway (you don't need 500 ft above them just clear it!!!) adjust trim and fly. You may not need to climb over anything just do a simple low level turn (learn to do a rudder turn) and fly around the obstacle. That is about all you really need to do. You can clean up flaps/power as needed when thing calm down. This works in the Cessna also with some procedure change (flaps to 20 first then trim) .
    The key to this is mindset that is this is just another simple slow flight around the countryside. More to follow.
    DENNY
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  8. #8
    C-GZUP Jorfarms's Avatar
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    I agree with Denny, I practiced flying around (4-5000 ft) with the stall buzzer going and maintaining altitude, you sure get a feel for your plane and lots of practice on the petals. That way you don’t seem to panic when the buzzer goes off on those short narrow runways.. It’s all about practice

  9. #9

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    Now to planning the landing. If possible fly over the strip and get a good look at go around route. This may include a hard turn right or left midfield or straight out flight for 3-4 mile to a good turn spot. Once again plan it all to happen without much climbing if possible. Don't be in a hurry to turn back to the strip, find a nice wide spot to turn if possible if not set up for a canyon turn. If it is a new to me strip the looks like I might have some issues I like to do my approach and a simple go around practice just to make sure everything works as planned. I may or may not drag the wheels. I think a steep power on approach is best because you can see the strip clearly and anything that might cause the abort coming. Look at the water, leafs and smoke to make sure the wind has not changed. A no go point is great to have. Don't try to save the landing, just add some power and keep on you slow easy tour of the country and try it again.
    DENNY

  10. #10

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    I have mentioned this before, but it is good to point out again. Plan you crash site! Because if you screw up the go around you want a good crash. When you are picking out a strip next to a stream pay attention to the water. If you have any rapids or white water you are looking at a pretty good slope make sure you are not landing down hill. What side or end of the runway will do the least amount of damage. Have all you friends parked on the same side of the strip giving you a out. Has some knucklehead parked right at the end or beginning of the strip? Green trees, planes, really big rocks, ect do some real damage. If you run off into alders you may bend a prop and tear some fabric but good chance you can fly it out with a little work. Have a crash plan set in place, phone numbers for insurance company, helicopter, and IA are what the plane needs.
    DENNY

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    While I am on the bandwagon one more note on aircraft parking. GET CLEAR OF THE RUNWAY!!!!!! Not jut lock a wheel and spin off, taxi until you are as clear as possible and everybody on the same side if possible. I don't care how long it is do not park on the end if possible. Wife wants to go for a walk so you are all saved from more pontification.
    DENNY
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  12. #12
    L18C-95's Avatar
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    A FedEx is on the clip - am I correct that the SOP for this operator was that the crew briefed the go around at different gates on the approach - and would proceed if, and only, all conditions were met for that gate on the approach. In effect the mind set was plan the go around, don’t get fixated on the landing.


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  13. #13
    TVATIVAK71's Avatar
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    A gem of an airport many pilots on this website have had the pleasure of providing regular service. I’ve been to all the LRRS airports and this is one I thought looked cool and I personally found challenging. Usually the winds were big from the wrong direction and ceilings low enough so you might see part of the runway or just the REIL’s. Tons of factors to consider especially when close in a go around “might” be improbable. Rumor has it though a company pilot took off uphill (+7.7 ? degree grade) into a 40kt+ headwind, turbulence and all and did a 180 back the other way in a Saratoga. He bragged about it, didn’t really believe it till I talked to the people that witnessed it. Anyway, lots of memories doing weekly service to Cape Newenham LRRS.
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  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by TVATIVAK71 View Post
    A gem of an airport many pilots on this website have had the pleasure of providing regular service. I’ve been to all the LRRS airports and this is one I thought looked cool and I personally found challenging. Usually the winds were big from the wrong direction and ceilings low enough so you might see part of the runway or just the REIL’s. Tons of factors to consider especially when close in a go around “might” be improbable. Rumor has it though a company pilot took off uphill (+7.7 ? degree grade) into a 40kt+ headwind, turbulence and all and did a 180 back the other way in a Saratoga. He bragged about it, didn’t really believe it till I talked to the people that witnessed it. Anyway, lots of memories doing weekly service to Cape Newenham LRRS.
    That's a cool photo for memories. I landed there once in the Birdog, out of gas and ideas. The ceiling exactly matched the number for the runway on the chart. Expected to see the full military but didn't care at that point. Always be present at your own hearing they say... Dumped in the 8 cans of gas in the back and left.. no military, and thanks to them for that. I guess I probably took off downhill but don't really remember that part.. just the willingness to land on their strip no matter what they said.

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