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Thread: Just bought my 1st plane, PA-18-150, and looking for recommendations on IFR avionics

  1. #41
    mvivion's Avatar
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    George,

    As Web pointed out in an earlier post, said equine t must be installed and certified. And, yes, you can fly IFR in uncontrolled airspace, but let us know how that works for you below 1200 feet.

    MTV
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  2. #42

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    "Wouldn’t an iPad and AOA system meet all the requirements?"

    No it would not. Portable navigation devices do not meet TSO requirements.

    I have flown IFR in a 185 on floats no transponder with a single nav com. Yeah it can be done, not easy but possible. I have flown 6 legs in a 737 without an autopilot and I shot an approach on 3 of those legs. Legally it can be done, not easy, but it can be done. Point is this. Every mission is different and every mission requires an evaluation of what you are going to do, what is the required equipment for the mission, is that enough equipment to safely execute the mission and finally are you proficient enough to use that level of equipment. Nor is the required equipment sometimes clear. For instance, yes you can operate IFR with an approved GPS only, and you can shoot a GPS approach at your destination. HOWEVER if your destination requires an alternate (failure to meet the 1-2-3 rule) you MAY NOT predicate your alternate minima upon the GPS approach there UNLESS your GPS is WAAS enabled and approved under TSO C145 or C146. However the alternate approach must be based upon GPS LNAV only, or Circling minimums, not VNAV or LPV . That is not in Part 91 but is in the AIM and the approval certificates for your equipment. That is one example of "navigation equipment appropriate for the route to be flown". Thus if you were fly a mission with only a GPS approach at the destination airport (or all you had was GPS), and you had an alternate required and you could only execute a GPS approach there, if you are in a non WAAS situation either by equipment, NOTAM or RAIM, you cannot complete the mission. Careful evaluation is always required of the mission well beyond the regulations in FAR 91, 135 and 121 but down to the certification basis of your equipment and aircraft.
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  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by mvivion View Post
    George,

    As Web pointed out in an earlier post, said equine t must be installed and certified. And, yes, you can fly IFR in uncontrolled airspace, but let us know how that works for you below 1200 feet.

    MTV
    Quote Originally Posted by GeeBee View Post
    "Wouldn’t an iPad and AOA system meet all the requirements?"

    No it would not. Portable navigation devices do not meet TSO requirements.

    I have flown IFR in a 185 on floats no transponder with a single nav com. Yeah it can be done, not easy but possible. I have flown 6 legs in a 737 without an autopilot and I shot an approach on 3 of those legs. Legally it can be done, not easy, but it can be done. Point is this. Every mission is different and every mission requires an evaluation of what you are going to do, what is the required equipment for the mission, is that enough equipment to safely execute the mission and finally are you proficient enough to use that level of equipment. Nor is the required equipment sometimes clear. For instance, yes you can operate IFR with an approved GPS only, and you can shoot a GPS approach at your destination. HOWEVER if your destination requires an alternate (failure to meet the 1-2-3 rule) you MAY NOT predicate your alternate minima upon the GPS approach there UNLESS your GPS is WAAS enabled and approved under TSO C145 or C146. However the alternate approach must be based upon GPS LNAV only, or Circling minimums, not VNAV or LPV . That is not in Part 91 but is in the AIM and the approval certificates for your equipment. That is one example of "navigation equipment appropriate for the route to be flown". Thus if you were fly a mission with only a GPS approach at the destination airport (or all you had was GPS), and you had an alternate required and you could only execute a GPS approach there, if you are in a non WAAS situation either by equipment, NOTAM or RAIM, you cannot complete the mission. Careful evaluation is always required of the mission well beyond the regulations in FAR 91, 135 and 121 but down to the certification basis of your equipment and aircraft.
    Darn, I guess I forgot the smiley in my post.

  4. #44
    skywagon8a's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvivion View Post
    And, yes, you can fly IFR in uncontrolled airspace, but let us know how that works for you below 1200 feet.

    MTV
    I could give you an example of this being done safely and legally but that might give some marginally qualified pilots the wrong idea which could get them in trouble. It does require that the pilot be intimately familiar with the "neighborhood".
    N1PA

  5. #45
    L18C-95's Avatar
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    Did Piper ever get the PA18 certified for IFR?


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  6. #46
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by L18C-95 View Post
    Did Piper ever get the PA18 certified for IFR?


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    Here is one Piper did.
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    Steve Pierce

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  7. #47

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    Besides the Husky I also fly a Bonanza, my point about IFR on top is usually you will find smooth air and that 18 out of 20 flights end with a VFR approach.

    yes I fly in the MSP class B airspace that will require ADSB out. The Husky will be used for going to the cabin in Ely MN or fishing in Canada. Right now I could fly the ILS or VOR approach into KANE then transition to surfside seaplane base. I would only do it if the airport was VFR. The husky will be on straight floats
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  8. #48

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ID:	39902First point — given the current AOA thread, I am surprised you guys took my bait so easily.

    Second point — I think instrument skills are enormously important. Tail dragger experience has made me a better helicopter and jet pilot, but instrument skills have made me a better off airport pilot. Instrument skills have also increased both my level of safety and ability to get flights done in the off airport/bush environment.

    No experienced instrument pilot thinks a light wing loaded Cub or Husky is a great instrument platform, but I am sure many more pilots have met their maker trying to stay visual under clouds, as opposed to pilots that have crashed flying instruments in light planes. Some of my most terrifying flights have been in the back seat of a Beaver or Otter, with some VFR air taxi or lodge pilot trying to continue underneath when up was a far safer out.

    I don’t think it pencils trying to make a classic Cub instrument legal, although every Cub or Husky I fly has one or two attitude indicators to give me options. I also don’t think some clapped out Cherokee with circa 1980 avionics makes sense as an instrument trainer. Better to learn in a G1000 rental plane, with a PFD/MFD, IFR WAAS GPS, ground prox, and an AP/FD. I took this picture this morning heading out to play in the desert, and while not instrument legal or sensible, it has close to the avionics capability of current jets.
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  9. #49
    mvivion's Avatar
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    George,

    One “wild card” which often limits the ability to “go up” is a phenomenon called ice. And it can happen at most times of the year in the north.

    MTV
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  10. #50

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    GeeBee - only six? I got so good at hand- flying the no autopilot 737 at 35,000 feet I could dazzle the new copilots! Once landed a 737-200 on battery only - legally dispatched, but the APU died. No generators! VFR, of course.

    Again, I think we decided that the certification basis of the Super Cub allows instrument flight. Later lightplanes, like the Decathlon, cannot be made IFR legal without considerable expense and testing, but in Cubs and Stinsons, you just put the radios and gyros in.

    As for IFR with just one nav radio - my first flight in a Cessna 180 was single pilot IFR out of Vero Beach with a single Superhomer. Good thing I had lots of Cub time.

    And out west you can still find uncontrolled airspace that goes up to 10,000 feet. No clearance required.
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  11. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by mvivion View Post
    George,

    One “wild card” which often limits the ability to “go up” is a phenomenon called ice. And it can happen at most times of the year in the north.

    MTV
    From May thru the beginning of October, I fly countless trips between Homer and our remote cabin on Lake Clark. I get more ice in “the summer” over the west side of Cook Inlet at 10,000-12,00 feet, with an east wind, and over the Chigmit Mountans between Chitina Bay and Lake Iliamna and Clark, than anywhere else I fly in the US. Enough ice that it is more than a TKS Caravan can handle some days, and I have near run out a 21 gallon TKS tank on a 100 mile flight there. There are also many days when there is no ice. With experience, it is pretty easy to figure out whether there will be ice or not, and when you are wrong, a 180 degree turn, climb or descent to exit icing conditions is in order. I can’t remember a single day that I would rather be over fifty miles of Cook Inlet at 1,000 feet under a broken to overcast layer, rather than at 12,000 feet with glide to shore. That goes for a Carbon Cub, Husky, 185, Caravan or a Bell helicopter.

    If handling the worst conditions possible is our criteria, pretty soon we will only be in a hot wing jet, flying runway to runway, on days without runway contamination, or just staying on the ground. Back to the original post, it is best practice, even in backcountry flying, to have current instrument skills and enough equipment in whatever you are flying to open up more of the sky for routine or emergency operations. Hopefully this new Cub owner will acquire those skills.
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  12. #52

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    So after summer 18' on the East coast and spending three different days scud running at 1000' to try to get somewhere, I too have thought about how nice it would be to be able to file and climb on top when the ceiling is 1000' over. I have a standard VFR panel with a small compass centered in the panel and a vacuum turn and bank below. I plan to remove the turn and bank, move the compass to a remote location, maybe on top of the glare shield and put in an Aspen Evolution Pro in the center two holes. Then change out my old GPS for a used Garmin 430. I am pretty sure I am then legal for IFR. I would limit my IFR to daytime 1000' ceilings and have the IPAD with the Stratus AHRS and Foreflight
    as the emergency backup. Not that I really want to fly the SC IFR it provides some options to get out or in when everyone else is sitting around. Would have surely helped me out this past summer.

  13. #53
    cubdriver2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mjdonovan View Post
    Hi,

    I just closed on my first plane yesterday, a 1983 PA-18-150. It has a nice VFR panel, but needs an upgraded radio and a transponder with ADSB-out. So, I'm considering putting in the right avionics for addressing those issues, but also making it IFR compliant. Any reasonably affordable recommendations would be appreciated. For the IFR, I was thinking about getting a used GNS 430, but am open to other ideas/newer lower-cost GPS avionics. Also any recommendations on radio and ADSB would be good too. I want to take advantage of ADSB-in, so one idea was getting a Stratus 2 or 3 to go with a Transponder with ADS-B out.


    Ok, so now that you know where the dog pooped on the lawn, wipe your toes off in the grass and tell us about the cool Cub you just bought. We also like pictures. Great group on here but it's like growing up with bigger brothers, some days your going to get some noogies. Where is home so some of the locals can help you discover flying like no other flying carpet can?

    Glenn
    "Optimism is going after Moby Dick in a rowboat and taking the tartar sauce with you!"

  14. #54
    cubdriver2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by john machamer View Post
    So after summer 18' on the East coast and spending three different days scud running at 1000' to try to get somewhere, I too have thought about how nice it would be to be able to file and climb on top when the ceiling is 1000' over. I have a standard VFR panel with a small compass centered in the panel and a vacuum turn and bank below. I plan to remove the turn and bank, move the compass to a remote location, maybe on top of the glare shield and put in an Aspen Evolution Pro in the center two holes. Then change out my old GPS for a used Garmin 430. I am pretty sure I am then legal for IFR. I would limit my IFR to daytime 1000' ceilings and have the IPAD with the Stratus AHRS and Foreflight
    as the emergency backup. Not that I really want to fly the SC IFR it provides some options to get out or in when everyone else is sitting around. Would have surely helped me out this past summer.
    1000' in the North East is considered a CAVU day

    Glenn
    "Optimism is going after Moby Dick in a rowboat and taking the tartar sauce with you!"
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  15. #55
    cubdriver2's Avatar
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    This looks like a perfect solution to get out of trouble?

    https://youtu.be/pdQ0T7RfXOM

    Glenn
    "Optimism is going after Moby Dick in a rowboat and taking the tartar sauce with you!"

  16. #56
    wireweinie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by john machamer View Post
    So after summer 18' on the East coast and spending three different days scud running at 1000' to try to get somewhere, I too have thought about how nice it would be to be able to file and climb on top when the ceiling is 1000' over. I have a standard VFR panel with a small compass centered in the panel and a vacuum turn and bank below. I plan to remove the turn and bank, move the compass to a remote location, maybe on top of the glare shield and put in an Aspen Evolution Pro in the center two holes. Then change out my old GPS for a used Garmin 430. I am pretty sure I am then legal for IFR. I would limit my IFR to daytime 1000' ceilings and have the IPAD with the Stratus AHRS and Foreflight
    as the emergency backup. Not that I really want to fly the SC IFR it provides some options to get out or in when everyone else is sitting around. Would have surely helped me out this past summer.
    Read up on the installation instructions for that Aspen. Most IFR installations require a vacuum gyro as backup to keep the STC legal.

    Web
    Life's tough . . . wear a cup.

  17. #57
    flyrite's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cubdriver2 View Post
    This looks like a perfect solution to get out of trouble?

    https://youtu.be/pdQ0T7RfXOM

    Glenn
    Acro guys been using this product for awhile. Works great is mobile and no gyro to tumble!

  18. #58
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    Got this a couple days ago from the FAA. Not sure if it is the same model Aspen Evolution.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using SuperCub.Org mobile app
    Attached Files Attached Files
    The heavens declare the glory of God; the skies proclaim the work of His hands. Psalms 19:1

  19. #59
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    I have been in situations where I have filed enroute and climbed above clouds or descended to get below. Very handy in a cub, especially if you can jump into the wailing tailwind 4K feet above you.

    Original poster-

    I would add a Garmin 650 & an aspen or two G5's.

    The beauty of a 650 is that you can remote mount your transponder, so it is not taking space in the panel.

    Tim

  20. #60

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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ View Post
    Got this a couple days ago from the FAA. Not sure if it is the same model Aspen Evolution.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using SuperCub.Org mobile app
    It only involves those units if you have weather interface from ADS-B displaying on the Aspen unit.

  21. #61
    mvivion's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeMandes View Post
    From May thru the beginning of October, I fly countless trips between Homer and our remote cabin on Lake Clark. I get more ice in “the summer” over the west side of Cook Inlet at 10,000-12,00 feet, with an east wind, and over the Chigmit Mountans between Chitina Bay and Lake Iliamna and Clark, than anywhere else I fly in the US. Enough ice that it is more than a TKS Caravan can handle some days, and I have near run out a 21 gallon TKS tank on a 100 mile flight there. There are also many days when there is no ice. With experience, it is pretty easy to figure out whether there will be ice or not, and when you are wrong, a 180 degree turn, climb or descent to exit icing conditions is in order. I can’t remember a single day that I would rather be over fifty miles of Cook Inlet at 1,000 feet under a broken to overcast layer, rather than at 12,000 feet with glide to shore. That goes for a Carbon Cub, Husky, 185, Caravan or a Bell helicopter.

    If handling the worst conditions possible is our criteria, pretty soon we will only be in a hot wing jet, flying runway to runway, on days without runway contamination, or just staying on the ground. Back to the original post, it is best practice, even in backcountry flying, to have current instrument skills and enough equipment in whatever you are flying to open up more of the sky for routine or emergency operations. Hopefully this new Cub owner will acquire those skills.
    Thats all well and good, George, but if you want to stay legal, you’d do well to reference the FAAs latest definition of “Known icing”......which can seriously complicate flight in clouds with an airplane that’s not equipped for FIKI.

    I spent a lot lot of time slogging around under stuff, and some time in it. But cool weather and clouds can be better left alone unless you’re equipped, and if it’s warm weather, you’re also going to need weather for t-storm avoidance.

    Im just not a big fan of a Cub as an IFR platform. It can and has been done, no doubt. But there are certainly better platforms.

    MTV

  22. #62

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    For the average pilot the weight of a IFR panel in a cub is a not really an issue. How many can tell the difference between 20 and 25 gallons of fuel in a cub??? That is 30 lbs. Ya a cub is not a great IFR platform but if you need/want it and you have cubic dollars go for it. But, what is the mission? MJDONOVAN ya got to give us more info, DON'T LEAVE US HANGING DUDE!!!
    DENNY
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  23. #63
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    Mjdonovan “Welcome to the Forum” Oooooooooofa


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  24. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by mvivion View Post
    Thats all well and good, George, but if you want to stay legal, you’d do well to reference the FAAs latest definition of “Known icing”......which can seriously complicate flight in clouds with an airplane that’s not equipped for FIKI.

    I spent a lot lot of time slogging around under stuff, and some time in it. But cool weather and clouds can be better left alone unless you’re equipped, and if it’s warm weather, you’re also going to need weather for t-storm avoidance.

    Im just not a big fan of a Cub as an IFR platform. It can and has been done, no doubt. But there are certainly better platforms.

    MTV
    Again, "it depends". Almost daily you have marine layers covering places like coastal CA in which there is no icing but low ceilings and visibilities but no convective activity and no icing. Ditto places in the SE US. As I said initially, the Cub is no weather ship, but neither is it totally neutered. A lot of forecasts include "icing in clouds and precipitation" however if the operating altitudes are well below the freezing level it would be a hard case to press against a Part 91 operation. There are only two ways that case could be pressed successfully and that is if the POH prohibits it (which in any CAR 3 airplane that is not the case) or "careless and reckless". C&R usually would only come into play if there was an accident and regardless of the reason they are going to press that one anyway. Again as I tried to point it, it always, "depends". Particularly in Part 91.
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  25. #65
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    MJDONOVAN lobbed a dud grenade into the room then left the building. His thread has generated a lot of interesting and informative discussion, but without his input, no firm answers. I would like to see an answer to Steve Pierce's question: "What is the mission for the Super Cub?"

    I have been in inadvertent IMC in the Cub several times, and would never be without an attitude gyro. But I see no need for a completely IFR'r Super Cub. I had enough of that in the airline.
    "The sword of freedom is kept sharp by those who live on it's edge." - Scott Adams

  26. #66
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    Who is John Galt.
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  27. #67
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    Flew IFR for 40+ years. Been retired now almost 13 years. Flown zero approaches in that time. Bought 5 hotel room nights in that 2500 hrs of "playing with my friends". To equip, stay current and SAFE (proficient) requires a sizable investment. I'd rather put it in gas....ymmv

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    The OP should do exactly what he wants for his own reasons. Me? I'd wait to see if Dynon expands their certified boxes to include a Cub, or try to get a deviation to add one. After a little time with my G3X Touch my next airplane project may be to add a G500 txi to my Cessna and ditch the old school instruments and layout. And that's only 8 years old. Beware of what you spend on a panel because anything you do will be outdated in a couple if years. It'll still work, it just won't work as well as the new stuff. Fun with airplanes.... cha ching!
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  29. #69

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    The problem with the Garmin G500 and G1000 is upgradeability. Do not get me wrong, they are fabulous units but.......Lots of Cirrus and C-182 owners out there with pre-WAAS G1000s and the price to upgrade to WAAS will take your breath away. I think Garmin even stopped offering the upgrade. Worse, is on the C-182 the G1000 is part of the TDC so you are stuck with either big bucks or no Buck Rogers buying only from Garmin. I tend to look at modularity in avionics so that if something new comes out it is a box swap or a little more wiring. Equally so, I try to stay away from proprietary protocols and looks for something that will play nice with others.
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  30. #70

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    Assuming MJDonovan is still interested, I'll put my $0.02 in on where I am personally with this IFR thing. I fly in the Southeast and my only interest in IFR for my Super Cub is being able to get to altitude on popcorn cloud summer days and low overcast winter days. I totally agree that the Super Cub is a VFR plane though. I will probably never fly an approach or an arrival with the SC.

    My plane was IFR capable at one point, but the previous owner took out the turn coordinator for some reason. The King KLN 35A GPS is ancient, I can't really figure it out and its database was last updated in 1999. Updates are no longer available. It has an old King transponder and a King 155 Navcom radio. I'm not too worried about weight because new avionics will just be replacing the old stuff and at my age I'm not going to fly from Knoxville to Valdez to compete in the STOL competition anyway. A local avionics shop is putting together a quote for a used non-waas Garmin 430 with terrain, a Garmin GDL 82 ADS-B out, a used course indicator and a used electric turn coordinator. I already have an old Garmin GTX 327 transponder that will work well with the GDL 82. I don't plan on paying for an approach subscription for the 430.

    One problem I might have is that there is a diagonal crossbrace behind the panel - it means that I don't have room for a Garmin GNS 530 but the GNS 430 will probably go in.

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  31. #71
    mvivion's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tennessee View Post
    Assuming MJDonovan is still interested, I'll put my $0.02 in on where I am personally with this IFR thing. I fly in the Southeast and my only interest in IFR for my Super Cub is being able to get to altitude on popcorn cloud summer days and low overcast winter days. I totally agree that the Super Cub is a VFR plane though. I will probably never fly an approach or an arrival with the SC.

    My plane was IFR capable at one point, but the previous owner took out the turn coordinator for some reason. The King KLN 35A GPS is ancient, I can't really figure it out and its database was last updated in 1999. Updates are no longer available. It has an old King transponder and a King 155 Navcom radio. I'm not too worried about weight because new avionics will just be replacing the old stuff and at my age I'm not going to fly from Knoxville to Valdez to compete in the STOL competition anyway. A local avionics shop is putting together a quote for a used non-waas Garmin 430 with terrain, a Garmin GDL 82 ADS-B out, a used course indicator and a used electric turn coordinator. I already have an old Garmin GTX 327 transponder that will work well with the GDL 82. I don't plan on paying for an approach subscription for the 430.

    One problem I might have is that there is a diagonal crossbrace behind the panel - it means that I don't have room for a Garmin GNS 530 but the GNS 430 will probably go in.

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    its worth pointing out that is not a stock size panel. This is the “squared panel” that is mentioned here. Quite a bit more room than stock panel.

    MTV
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  32. #72
    aktango58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cubdriver2 View Post
    This looks like a perfect solution to get out of trouble?

    https://youtu.be/pdQ0T7RfXOM

    Glenn
    I believe that the Dynon STC is available from the EAA.

    Tennessee, drop the 530 below the panel, just set it back to clear the forward stick position, most every serious fish spotter has an avionics stack below the panel that would make most lear captains drool.

    If Uncle Eaton would will me an unlisted budget to upgrade my KX-155 IFR panel, I would stay with the G-5 I have, but add in a second one and the GPS that interfaces giving me not only a full attitude, t&B, vis, airspeed, ground speed altimeter- but instrument approach information all in one unit; small and compact and quick to read once you learn it.

    This system is great for saving lots of pounds out of your airplane, not only on installed equipment, but out of your pocketbook also

    Back in the dark ages IFR and instruments were in direct contrast to 'light'. Today we can have a full IFR legal panel for less weight than the old 'basic' panel used to be with the glass available. Some of the stuff is even more reliable when starting up at sub zero- gyros hate cold weather. The total package is also smaller than the basic panel used to be also- only two instruments and some wires and probes.

    So today the argument has evolved from weight and room, to reliability and cubic dollars. Reliability has been very good from what I have seen.
    I don't know where you've been me lad, but I see you won first Prize!

  33. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by aktango58 View Post
    I believe that the Dynon STC is available from the EAA.

    Tennessee, drop the 530 below the panel, just set it back to clear the forward stick position, most every serious fish spotter has an avionics stack below the panel that would make most lear captains drool.

    If Uncle Eaton would will me an unlisted budget to upgrade my KX-155 IFR panel, I would stay with the G-5 I have, but add in a second one and the GPS that interfaces giving me not only a full attitude, t&B, vis, airspeed, ground speed altimeter- but instrument approach information all in one unit; small and compact and quick to read once you learn it.

    This system is great for saving lots of pounds out of your airplane, not only on installed equipment, but out of your pocketbook also

    Back in the dark ages IFR and instruments were in direct contrast to 'light'. Today we can have a full IFR legal panel for less weight than the old 'basic' panel used to be with the glass available. Some of the stuff is even more reliable when starting up at sub zero- gyros hate cold weather. The total package is also smaller than the basic panel used to be also- only two instruments and some wires and probes.

    So today the argument has evolved from weight and room, to reliability and cubic dollars. Reliability has been very good from what I have seen.
    The only STCs for Dynon equipment is for the various 172s. The D-3 shown in that video isn't approved for anything....it's portable.

    The new, be all, do all Dynon Skyview system starts at $10 K and goes up rapidly if you actually want anything other than a PFD. $23 K or so for the IFR version.....again, only STC'd in 172, with pending approval for Bonanza. Looks to be a very nice system, but bring $$$.

    And, I don't know what the weights are for those, but when Aviat started installing Garmin G-600 in some Huskys, I asked how much weight was saved, and their response was that it's actually heavier than conventional IFR setup. Don't know how much or why, but..... So, I'd verify weights before I went there. Bear in mind that a PFD requires a backup for IFR (and maybe for VFR). That can be steam gauges or another PFD. Again, bring $$$

    MTV

  34. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tennessee View Post
    Assuming MJDonovan is still interested, I'll put my $0.02 in on where I am personally with this IFR thing. I fly in the Southeast and my only interest in IFR for my Super Cub is being able to get to altitude on popcorn cloud summer days and low overcast winter days. I totally agree that the Super Cub is a VFR plane though. I will probably never fly an approach or an arrival with the SC.

    My plane was IFR capable at one point, but the previous owner took out the turn coordinator for some reason. The King KLN 35A GPS is ancient, I can't really figure it out and its database was last updated in 1999. Updates are no longer available. It has an old King transponder and a King 155 Navcom radio. I'm not too worried about weight because new avionics will just be replacing the old stuff and at my age I'm not going to fly from Knoxville to Valdez to compete in the STOL competition anyway. A local avionics shop is putting together a quote for a used non-waas Garmin 430 with terrain, a Garmin GDL 82 ADS-B out, a used course indicator and a used electric turn coordinator. I already have an old Garmin GTX 327 transponder that will work well with the GDL 82. I don't plan on paying for an approach subscription for the 430.

    One problem I might have is that there is a diagonal crossbrace behind the panel - it means that I don't have room for a Garmin GNS 530 but the GNS 430 will probably go in.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    If you want to keep this style panel and use the 530, the easiest way is to cut a new panel. Move your push/pull cables and key switch down to the lower edge and the 530 will fit. Cutting the panel itself is not a huge job. LOTS of wiring to do after the cutting is done.

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  35. #75

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    I have been thinking about the same questions as you. Started with getting IR (in an Arrow)- halfway now. Got tailwheel endorsement a few months away also because i was thinking of getting a Cub (possibly IFR certificated). Now I’m restoring a Cub and have learned a lot about the aircraft. It will be a very unstable IFR platform. The fun thing with a Cub is accomplished with as light weight as possible and as many HP as possible in the same aircraft. If money is of importance (as it is to most of us), lightweight is the most important part of the above.
    I will try to get my cub NQ- which means “partly” IFR certified. But the size of the panel is really a problem.
    As small instruments as possible, only necessary instruments (also because they might break..) and as lightweight instruments as possible (G5/D3 other similar, Sandel? Have I forgotten anyone?- TRIG transponder and radio got good reviews, there are a few others- Garmin 650 or even better the Avidyne IFD440 with the iPad app if you really want mounted GPS..otherwise Stratux seem to give good value for money with built in AHRS and other features.).
    If I have to go in the “soup” I really would lika a certified G5 and FF with a Stratux as backup as a minimum.
    What do you other pilots say about the above!?

  36. #76
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    So what are the required type of instruments and radios for this NQ certification? What's required, not what you'd like?

    Web
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  37. #77

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    Required instruments:
    • Collision warning light
    • Navigation lights / position lights
    • A landing spotlight
    • Light for instruments and equipment
    • Light for the passenger compartment
    • Pilot pilot / pilot light
    • Gir and turn indicator
    • Horizon Gray
    • Variometer
    • Kursgyro
    • Pitot tube heat (depending on flight conditions)
    • Warning for failure of the power supply to the gyro industry
    • Magnetic Compass
    • Clock showing hours, minutes and seconds (may be a wristwatch)
    • Pressure altimeter
    • Speedometer.
    • First aid kit
    • Fire extinguisher except for ELA 1 aircraft
    • Float vests for emergency landing in the water are likely in the event of engine shutdown
    • ELT, for aircraft up to 6 seats, is sufficient for PLB
    • Flying vests / flight aids (during flight including start / landing over water) Communication equipment (depends on airspace rules)
    • ATS Transponder (depends on airspace rules)
    • Survival equipment (in some cases)
    • Navigation equipment (in some cases, eg flight "on-top")
    • Oxygen equipment (in some cases)
    Last edited by jokerswe2008; 12-01-2018 at 06:02 PM.

  38. #78

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    To clarify..
    Horizontal gyro, course gyro, heated pitot, and indicator warning for failure of the above. Standard instruments (altimeter, VSI, airspeed indicator, whiskey compass) - lights, and the rest as needed depending on the aerospace. Nothing about backup systems.
    Last edited by jokerswe2008; 12-01-2018 at 05:53 PM. Reason: Clarity

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    What country is that? In the US, I think three gyros and a nav radio will be legal, along with the clock and VFR instruments. Not sure, but I think no requirement for a rate of climb, let alone a variometer.

  40. #80
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    EU regulations. He lives in Sweden.

    Web
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