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Thread: PA12 Flight Characteristics Vs. PA18

  1. #81

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    Quote Originally Posted by TurboBeaver View Post
    Interesting when the thread ended no one chimed in on the actual merits of a Catto prop on a standard long mount that is always way forward CG when coupled with
    A Borer prop? Removing 17/18 lbs out on the end of the crankshaft will certainly change the age old empty CG curse?? One should also keep in mind that lots of times
    When folks are expounding the merits of 18 vs 12s they are commonly comparing 1250/1300 lb 12s to 1100lb 18s. A light 12 that is" rigged up the same" as the 18; should be just the difference of the AOI of the two wings
    All things equal?? However the old saying "only thing that
    Will beat a cub; is another cub" : Will always be true. But when you think your Cub is a hotrod try it against Greg Peppards 12 some day! LoL

    E
    I agree with TurboBeaver, and can’t stress more the merits of the lightweight Catto prop on the standard long mount with 160hp and balanced tail -12. Night and day flight characteristics removing that weight off the nose. That along with VG’s and Cub Crafters gap seals on the tail make it an absolute joy to fly. Prior to those changes she had the negative’s characteristics many folks identified/mentioned earlier.
    Don’t get any better than a light weight well balanced properly rigged cub. Whether it’s a -12 or -18.




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  2. #82
    Lisa Martin LMartin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 12Geezer2 View Post
    There are so many variables---empty weight---rigging----etc---etc. Pilot skills and FEEL for his/her airplane. Have flown a number of Super Cubs that are "supposedly" stock---and seldom find any two that fly the same. Piper had some "variables" in there building process also. Just part of what keeps it all so interesting
    That's the response I was looking to find. PA-12s tend to have too much stuff on the panel, and lots of times no flaps, incomparable with a well balanced Cub. I owned an 800lb PA-12-140 on edo 2000s, a 1200 lb PA-18-150 on edo 2000s and a 1000 lb PA18-105 then converted to 150 on wheels all at the same time. All three airplanes had flaps and PA18 tail feathers. Impossible to compare the floats to wheels, but the two on edo's performed almost identically. I like the PA-12 better to do float instruction in because a lot of large Americans want float ratings, the -12 is easier for them to get in and out of, and the panel was arranged so that the airspeed was far left, so I could keep better track of it (although I do find a PA18 easier to feel...maybe simply because I have no other option in the PA-18s I've done training in). The PA-12-S was extremely docile and controllable, everybody loved it and thought it was the easiest plane ever to fly. Being so light definitely was a major contributor to that. It was a little nose heavy, even with the shorter engine mount and 10lbs added in the far aft of the tail, so that if an applicant was over 250 lbs, pushing 300, they would run out of nose up trim (to my 125 in the backseat), and at times I would switch with them an have them fly from the roomier backseat for the added performance. I love them both, but for my own personal flying, I'll take my Cub any day over the Cruiser. I don't know why. It just fits.
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  3. #83
    skywagon8a's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LMartin View Post
    I owned an 800lb PA-12-140 on edo 2000s.
    Really? 800 pounds ON floats, with flaps???? Did you break your pencil when you did the weight & balance calculations? That is an unheard of number.
    N1PA

  4. #84

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    Quote Originally Posted by skywagon8a View Post
    Really? 800 pounds ON floats, with flaps???? Did you break your pencil when you did the weight & balance calculations? That is an unheard of number.
    I was think the same


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  5. #85

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    What's a PA-12-140?

  6. #86
    Lisa Martin LMartin's Avatar
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    Lycoming O-290D2

  7. #87

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    Doesn't the 135hp 290 weigh essentially the same as a 320? Not busting your chops, I'm just interested. My old-12 was a joy to fly on EDO 2000s.

  8. #88
    Lisa Martin LMartin's Avatar
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    That was the weight of each before floats...it was actually 700+. I couldn't remember how much the floats added compared to wheels (200?). The PA12 was stripped down to bear mins: minimal paint, minimal panel, no interior, no cabin heat, no alternator, etc. The PA12 was one of the few that came from the factory with flaps.

  9. #89
    Lisa Martin LMartin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stewartb View Post
    Doesn't the 135hp 290 weigh essentially the same as a 320? Not busting your chops, I'm just interested. My old-12 was a joy to fly on EDO 2000s.
    The O290D2 weighed less. It was the best power to weight ratio engine Lycoming made. I don't know why they quit it. Old Cub ag-pilots routinely say that was the best performing power on Cubs they sprayed with.
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  10. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by LMartin View Post
    That was the weight of each before floats...it was actually 700+. I couldn't remember how much the floats added compared to wheels (200?). The PA12 was stripped down to bear mins: minimal paint, minimal panel, no interior, no cabin heat, no alternator, etc. The PA12 was one of the few that came from the factory with flaps.
    From TC A-780
    Landing Gear and Floats,
    204. Edo 89-2000 floats with water rudder and seaplane fin (Dwg. No. 11030) +183 lbs. (+14.5)


    +183 lbs was the added weight. The floats themselves weigh aprox. 266 lbs. That 800 lbs is still difficult to imagine and very hard to believe.
    N1PA
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  11. #91
    Lisa Martin LMartin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skywagon8a View Post
    From TC A-780
    Landing Gear and Floats,
    204. Edo 89-2000 floats with water rudder and seaplane fin (Dwg. No. 11030) +183 lbs. (+14.5)


    +183 lbs was the added weight. The floats themselves weigh aprox. 266 lbs. That 800 lbs is still difficult to imagine and very hard to believe.
    Well I can't help you with that one. I don't have a copy of the LEW on hand. Those were my two I had at the same time, and a comparision was requested. If you just want to argue...go find a different pig.
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  12. #92
    skywagon8a's Avatar
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    I'm sorry Lisa, I'm not trying to argue only expressing amazement at such an unheard of light weight. I do know that manufacturers were well known to use marketing numbers on their W&B sheets. You did say you didn't know the weight of the floats, so I supplied you with that information.
    N1PA
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  13. #93

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    I've got enough (for me, not very much comparably) time in a -12 and an -18 to note the following:

    - A modded -12 will run out of nose up if flown solo (or at least with my phat a** flying it solo) without some strategic placement of survival gear and supplies.
    - An un-modded -12 has a noticeably lighter feel on the stick than a modded -12
    - The -18 does have AOA benefits over the -12
    - I've been in 3 different -18's and 4 (including mine) different -12's. Other than one of the -12's that was essentially unairworthy, all of the airplanes could fly better than I could drive them.
    - I can fly my -12 to it's limit about 1 in every 6-7 flights. When I get to the point that the aircraft is the limiting factor, I'd probably look for a light -18, but I'm not sure I'll ever make it to the point where the critical path to ideal low and slow runs through the aircraft instead of through the driver.
    Back In Alaska
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  14. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by skywagon8a View Post
    From TC A-780
    Landing Gear and Floats,
    204. Edo 89-2000 floats with water rudder and seaplane fin (Dwg. No. 11030) +183 lbs. (+14.5)


    +183 lbs was the added weight. The floats themselves weigh aprox. 266 lbs. That 800 lbs is still difficult to imagine and very hard to believe.
    Maybe they used the same scales piper used from the factory.


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  15. #95

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    Quote Originally Posted by LMartin View Post
    That was the weight of each before floats...it was actually 700+. I couldn't remember how much the floats added compared to wheels (200?). The PA12 was stripped down to bear mins: minimal paint, minimal panel, no interior, no cabin heat, no alternator, etc. The PA12 was one of the few that came from the factory with flaps.
    Very interesting. I didn't know any -12s had factory installed flaps. Sounds like a fun airplane. Have you flown a modified -12 with a short mount?

  16. #96

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    Quote Originally Posted by stewartb View Post
    Very interesting. I didn't know any -12s had factory installed flaps. Sounds like a fun airplane. Have you flown a modified -12 with a short mount?
    Didn't know they made them either until I ran into a guy with a bone stock -12 with factory flaps.

  17. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by pcj_5189 View Post
    Didn't know they made them either until I ran into a guy with a bone stock -12 with factory flaps.
    They are listed on the type certificate A-780, but only as an aftermarket approval.
    "*602. Flap installation installed in accordance with Mainair, Inc. (formerly Marden +14 lbs. (+39)Airways, Inc.), Waterville, Maine, PA-12 Flap Kit No. 1000-M and Installation Instructions dated January 22, 1949"

    "
    Approval for the installation of all items of equipment listed herein has been obtained by the aircraft manufacturer except thoseitems preceded by an asterisk (*). The asterisk denotes that approval has been obtained by someone other than the aircraftmanufacturer. An item marked with an asterisk may not have been manufactured under a FAA monitored or approved qualitycontrol system, and therefore conformity must be determined if the item is not identified by a Form ACA-186, FAA-PMA, orother evidence of FAA production approval."

    If they were installed "at the factory" I suspect the completed plane was taken "across the field" after production for the modification prior to delivery. It would be interesting to see the original paper work on these two airplanes to answer the question.
    N1PA

  18. #98

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    I saw the plane when I looked at another -12 the guy had for sale and he stated that the one with flaps was one of "a few" that came with factory flaps. I didn't see the paperwork. It was a very nice plane with spats and looked like a good buy for someone wanting to have a unique original specimen. He wanted to sell it but it wasn't something I was looking for.

  19. #99
    TurboBeaver's Avatar
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    Pete,
    He is looking at an "amended" W&B on that 12 that some mechanic who flunked math class, must have done those calculations.
    2 things you can count on is it didn't actually weight 800lbs on floats, and it didn't come from the factory with flaps.....
    Folks often confuse the 14's with 12's and of course the 14's did come from the factory with flaps. The Mardens Airways original mod for flaps on a 12 simply used all factory 14 parts to do the conversion.
    Down to the flap handle being on the RIGHT side of the seat!!! Still a few floating around Maine with handle on right
    side! I have a Cub that shows an empty weight of 860 lbs when it was built in 1983 by Don Snyder in Pa that holds the STCs for
    Lots of PA12 mods........ That weight is of course another fairytale. We are going to do an actual W&B on it this fall (digital scales) when it comes off floats. The number will likely be north of a 1000lbs........... Just the facts of life, when it comes to Cub/Cruiser weights.

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  20. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by TurboBeaver View Post
    Pete,
    He is looking at an "amended" W&B on that 12 that some mechanic who flunked math class, must have done those calculations.
    2 things you can count on is it didn't actually weight 800lbs on floats, and it didn't come from the factory with flaps.....
    Folks often confuse the 14's with 12's and of course the 14's did come from the factory with flaps. The Mardens Airways original mod for flaps on a 12 simply used all factory 14 parts to do the conversion.
    Down to the flap handle being on the RIGHT side of the seat!!! Still a few floating around Maine with handle on right
    side! I have a Cub that shows an empty weight of 860 lbs when it was built in 1983 by Don Snyder in Pa that holds the STCs for
    Lots of PA12 mods........ That weight is of course another fairytale. We are going to do an actual W&B on it this fall (digital scales) when it comes off floats. The number will likely be north of a 1000lbs........... Just the facts of life, when it comes to Cub/Cruiser weights.

    Sent from my moto e5 go using SuperCub.Org mobile app
    You may not want to weigh it. Or don’t record it.


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  21. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Pierce View Post
    , curious what others who have flown both think comparing the two.
    My experience with both was the PA12 was much closer to the PA18 when on floats, in T/O mode, as opposed to on wheels.
    With the "Borer rudder centering mod", the -12 always felt longitudinally unstable on floats.
    With stock door, the -12 was like getting in, proceeding down a short hallway, then settling into the seat. This got a little more difficult with a life jacket or a parka on. Not so bad with the -18.
    In the -12, NO room between my knees and the bottom of the dash. -18 was better.
    As previously mentioned, with 3 people, the -12 did much better on CG. Also remember, the rear seat requires the 3000# belt. Seen some with the standard 1500 pounder.
    My 2 ˘ worth.
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  22. #102
    skywagon8a's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwmusgrove View Post
    With the "Borer rudder centering mod", the -12 always felt longitudinally unstable on floats.
    This type of mod (not just on the -12) is only a band-aid fix for an airplane that needs more vertical tail area. All it does is to BS the FAA into approving an installation. The ventral fin is required by the Type Certificate when a -12 is on floats. The Borer STC eliminates the ventral fin requirement, which is why the -12 with the STC is longitudinally unstable on floats. More vertical tail area = more longitudinal stability.
    N1PA
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  23. #103

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Rusk View Post
    Steve
    I have Marks PA- 12 in my hangar and get to fly it on a regular basis along with my cub. And occasionally other super Cubs. Marks 12 has very few modifications other than 150 hp and super cub tailfeathers so it is very light. The PA 12 requires a lot of trim. If you are 10 or even 5 miles an hour off of your trimed airspeed the stick becomes heavy very very quickly so one significant difference between the 12 And the 18 is that the 12 requires a constant, and significant, amount of trim.
    Perhaps because of the angle of incidence the 12 does not take off anywhere near as short as the 18. I will take off from an intersection, even on amphibs, in the 18 that I would not consider doing in the PA 12 It just has a much much longer take off roll. Marks PA 12 does not have flaps and the 12 has a cleaner air frame than the 18 so it will float forever in the flare, and it is much more difficult to get slowed down on final. So making a short landing in the 12 is much more challenging than making a short landing in the 18. The only way to get in really short on the 12 without the flaps, is to come in completely crossed controlled, in a forward slip, to try to get behind the power curve a little bit so that you don't float in the flair. Some people have said that the PA 12 has a faster roll rate than the 18, but I don't see that. A significant difference is that you get into the PA 12 standing up, you get into the 18 sitting down.

    These are just my thoughts, your mileage may vary, and I'm sure others will have another opinions as well.

    Hope this helps



    Bill
    I can +1 pretty much all your PA-12 flying experiences in this post Bill My PA-12 is almost completely standard, although now with an O-235-C2C rather than its original O-235-C and interesting that it sounds the same as the 150hp version!! I 1,000,000% agree with the short landing technique, as until I started landing mine like the Pitts S-1S which is side slip pretty much all the way to the flare, I was consistently floating on, whereas the side slip adds REAL speed and rate of height loss control. I also agree with the standing up and lying down analogy with getting in and to be honest, that's the one thing I miss about the PA-18........ I was taught the "sit on the door hinge, hold the windscreen vertical bar, lean back and swing your legs in" technique by a WW2 pilot who originally learned on a Cub when I started flying the 18 and I find the squeezing round and into the front seat of the 12 a lot less fun and elegant

    I agree that the aileron feel is a lot lighter than the 18 and maybe why the roll rate feels better?

    On trim, I again completely agree that the stick force gets VERY heavy when out of trim and one of my most effective mods has been to mount the trim handle in oilite bearings, which at least makes the almost constant trimming a lot more pleasant experience!!!

    Philly
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  24. #104
    TurboBeaver's Avatar
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    Phil,
    The roll rate feels better because it IS better, the ailerons on the 12 have ALOT more travel BOTH ways than the 18 does,
    And the leading edge of the ailerons is arguably of a better design. Togeather they do give you that feel you are " feeling"...... Piper got it right with the 12 aileron system; But must have decided, it was just to expensive, to use that system In the 18 series ? Cub Crafters basically went back to the 12 type system, on the new X series,
    To take advantage of that system.

    Cheers
    E

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    Last edited by TurboBeaver; 11-14-2020 at 05:17 AM.
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  25. #105
    Gordon Misch's Avatar
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    Flew a buddy's -18 a few days ago, in part to compare with my -12. It seemed a little less responsive in roll, but comfortable, and MUCH lighter in pitch - with seemingly greater stick deflection. Edit: It seemed delightfully well balanced in all three axes.

    At least part of that is different geometry in the stick to base connector link. His has somewhat less measured distance between pivot point to torque tube centerline than mine. My understanding, per Mr Ed's research, is that Piper made some changes in that geometry around 1960 or thereabouts. That would certainly explain a difference.

    SuPilot - what was your comparative impression re stick force/deflection between your 18 and my 12?
    Last edited by Gordon Misch; 11-12-2020 at 11:41 PM.
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  26. #106
    behindpropellers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon Misch View Post
    Flew a buddy's -18 a few days ago, in part to compare with my -12. It seemed a little less responsive in roll, but comfortable, and MUCH lighter in pitch - with seemingly greater stick deflection.

    At least part of that is different geometry in the stick to base connector link. His has somewhat less measured distance between pivot point to torque tube centerline than mine. My understanding, per Mr Ed's research, is that Piper made some changes in that geometry around 1960 or thereabouts. That would certainly explain a difference.

    SuPilot - what was your comparative impression re stick force/deflection between your 18 and my 12?

    I used to know this, I think it is something like .375" difference on the bottom pivot to the torque tube pivot.

    Tim

  27. #107
    Gordon Misch's Avatar
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    I think it's more than that. He sent me a measurement a day or two ago, and I think it was more like an inch+ in comparison to Piper's PA-12 drawing and the Exp I'm working on now.

    I don't have actual numbers in front of me though, so as usual, I could be significantly wrong.
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  28. #108
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    Gordon brings up a good point about the differences in control forces re: ailerons. The length of that arm will reduce the forces required to move the ailerons when it is shortened. However it will also reduce the amount the aileron moves, since the cable will not move quite as far as it used to. C=Pi x D

    When making alterations to a control system while wanting to make a certain improvement, you must look at the entire system to learn what else will be changed at the other end. In this case of reducing control pressures (making it lighter) your maximum rolling authority would also be reduced.

    For example, if you were building your own plane wanting to reduce the control pressures by shortening the length of the arm under the torque tube, you could retain or even improve the authority of the ailerons by moving them further outboard. This gives the ailerons a longer leverage arm when banking the wings thus reducing the force required.
    N1PA

  29. #109
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    I changed the stick to base length when I changed to the s. cub type elevator cable system. The J-3/12 system doesn't use the pully that is between your feet in the center of the front floorboard. The s. cub type is much smoother. My ailerons are outboard without stops on them and I used bearing pulleys there and for both elev. cables. Makes for pretty smooth operation all around for a cub type control system. Those who have flown it say it is very smooth and responsive. And as Pete said the leverage of the ailerons outboard make for easy float lifting at speeds lower than you might expect. Works for me anyway. If someone needs it, the old bushed holes are still in my sticks and I can measure the difference in the old hole and the new one.
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