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Thread: Facebook was a basket of fruit this morning.

  1. #41
    Farmboy's Avatar
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  3. #43
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    For those that need another unique aircraft in their stable. Get your own Twin Champ for $35k.

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  4. #44
    Farmboy's Avatar
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    And at a not-so-local airport, apparently the locals think it's a Supercub Fly-in.

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  5. #45
    RaisedByWolves's Avatar
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    That twin champ would suit you good.


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  6. #46
    skywagon8a's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Farmboy View Post
    For those that need another unique aircraft in their stable. Get your own Twin Champ for $35k.

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    The Lancer is not a converted anything. It has it's own type certificate http://rgl.faa.gov/Regulatory_and_Guidance_Library/rgMakeModel.nsf/0/bead91c1f5a947968525672e00466554/$FILE/A3ce.PDF
    and was built to be a low cost multi-engine trainer. There is an STC to convert the engines to 0-320s. I used to think that it would be fun to change the engines and put it on floats.
    N1PA
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  7. #47
    SJ's Avatar
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    I had a friend who almost bought one to build multi time.

    sj
    "Often Mistaken, but Never in Doubt"
    ------------------------------------------

  8. #48
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    http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone...rm-chasing-jet


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  9. #49
    Farmboy's Avatar
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    Just saw this posted and had to share.

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  10. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by Farmboy View Post
    Just saw this posted and had to share.

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    Square the tail and that could be the 180/85 type club logo
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  11. #51
    Farmboy's Avatar
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    Meanwhile, in Italy, where Marco Bulgheroni has been leading the charge, it sure looks like they would fit right in with us here in the states. Proof that flying off-airport is still a universal language.

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  12. #52
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    If you're curious about Cascina Dolomiti.... https://translate.google.com/transla...t/&prev=search


    If you've not seen Marco's playground.... well...

    Last edited by Farmboy; 10-14-2018 at 02:20 PM.
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  13. #53
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    Something for Glenn.
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    Transmitted from my FlightPhone

  14. #54
    Farmboy's Avatar
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    The older, bolder generation did it all before us. A couple of bicycles hanging from wings captured the attention of thousands. A pit bike hung on the side, or a dirt bike slung underneath gets discussed for days by us, and shocks the general aviation community.

    And yet, a farmer somewhere probably needed to feed the heifers in the dead of winter and came up with a better solution. No fuss, no issues, just got the job done.
    Kudos to Mr. Dunn of Maine for posting the photo.

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  15. #55
    Farmboy's Avatar
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    “A lovely human perversity” he says.....

    https://www.facebook.com/BBCArchive/...7305076935604/


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  16. #56

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  17. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by stewartb View Post

    Love that plane!

  18. #58
    Farmboy's Avatar
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    This is a funny article by Kevin Garrison -

    Link:
    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/oh-iv...dUAK4vnr4HPMrQ

    Copied and Pasted :

    Oh, I've Flown Over the Desert in a Plane With No Mags....

    • Published on January 28, 2019

    The whole concept of a light sport aircraft is a strange thing. I understand that the Federal Aviation Administration wanted to begin a new class of aircraft that people could fly without having a third class medical, but the rules seem a little arbitrary to me.
    For example, where did they come up with that 1,320 max gross weight? It is pretty clear that they set the gross weight limit so low that your average sport pilot would not be allowed to fly a Cessna 150, 172 or Cherokee. He or she would have to either fly an airplane like a Champ (which is likely sixty or more years old) or shell out over a hundred grand for a new light sport airplane. In other words, the government pretty much made the whole thing too expensive from the beginning. They were clearly working for the aircraft manufacturers in this case, not the pilots.

    I have been flying the Champ as a light sport airplane for a while now and really enjoy every minute of it. For one thing, it takes me back to my younger days. I flew Champs a lot when I was a teen-aged line boy. Second, there is nothing more fun than flying a champ with the window open and the door off on a warm day.

    I recently thought I would move up and fly another kind of light sport airplane. This is the kind that has the bubble canopy, the high-tech instrument panel and (oh my gawd) the Rotax engine.

    I am sure that some of you out there in reader land just love the Rotax engine. You, of course, are idiots.

    The Rotax is the devil and represents everything evil about aviation today.

    First of all, the damn thing doesn’t have magnetos – it has some weird-assed European electronic ignition system. I just can’t trust an airplane that doesn’t have mags. It just ain’t natural.
    Next, in order to check the stupid thing you have to remove the entire top of the cowling. To check the oil requires that you turn the prop about fifty times to “burp” the engine. Excuse me? Wasn’t moving the prop considered dangerous? They even want you to rotate the prop in the regular direction. (about seventy five revolutions) Having no mags and no impulse couplers, this is perfectly safe with a Rotax – how about when the Light sport pilots move on to Champs? It’ll be “finger losing time” at the old Aeronca hangar.

    Finally, this engine-related spawn of Satan runs at about fifty gazillion RPM. Hell, if you get below 2,000 RPM they get all upset because you are FUBARing the gear box. Which leads to the incredulous question: The DAMN THING HAS a GEAR BOX???

    Once I climbed into the little bubble canopied POS to go flying, I noticed that there was no airflow in the cockpit during taxi. It was hotter than the surface of Spock’s home planet. We finally got it into the air only to learn that it only had a 10 knot crosswind limitation and flew like a short-coupled, under-powered, un-stable and much harder to fly version of the 1972 American Yankee, which at least had a normal engine.

    I am going back to my champs and cubs, thank you very much. The future may belong to these overpriced, hard to fly pieces of crap, but I won’t be piloting them. Mo-bettah they are flown by thirteen year olds from the ground using radio control boxes.
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  19. #59
    Farmboy's Avatar
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    I found an airplane designed by someone other than just an engineer.

    Who knew that wheels up in an A-10 simply made it a Taildragger and seems field repairable.

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    The Gatling gun barrels, on the other hand, seem to have gotten a little close to its target.

    Eddie?


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  20. #60
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    Not familiar with this one. Got any details?

    Yes, the wheels do not completely retract.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Farmboy View Post
    I found an airplane designed by someone other than just an engineer.

    Who knew that wheels up in an A-10 simply made it a Taildragger and seems field repairable.

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    The Gatling gun barrels, on the other hand, seem to have gotten a little close to its target.

    Eddie?


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    "Put out my hand and touched the face of God!"

  21. #61

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    Love the fact that they chocked the right main........
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  22. #62
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    "Optimism is going after Moby Dick in a rowboat and taking the tartar sauce with you!"

  23. #63
    Eddie Foy's Avatar
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    Did some research. The jet landed at Edwards AFB circa 2008. Serious gun malfunction. Nose gear questionable. Landed gear up.


    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie Foy View Post
    Not familiar with this one. Got any details?

    Yes, the wheels do not completely retract.

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    "Put out my hand and touched the face of God!"

  24. #64
    Eddie Foy's Avatar
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    Better photo in the link. The flight lead landed on the dry lake bed runway. Shut down Edwards for a day.
    https://aviation-safety.net/wikibase...TnXWWqnv--3Lvk
    "Put out my hand and touched the face of God!"

  25. #65
    Farmboy's Avatar
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    Good links Eddie. I see you signed your name to one back in 2012 too.

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  26. #66
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    Funniest thread I've seen in awhile.

    If you're on Facebook, go ready Kyle Irvings post in Taildragger pilots united. The responses are classic. The FAA has redistributed airplane ownership....

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/4140...1856689415413/

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  27. #67

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ID:	42681https://news.yahoo.com/small-plane-c...161337676.html

    Whoops, not FB but you get the picture, I'm sure it's on FB somewhere.
    Last edited by Cappt; 04-27-2019 at 10:40 AM.

  28. #68
    cubdriver2's Avatar
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  29. #69

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    Awhile back on cable there was a show where actual WWII bombadiers tried to hit a target in the desert. Might have been 909. The conclusion was that currency is everything.
    What's a go-around?

  30. #70
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    Not from facebook, but still entertaining


  31. #71
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    As a fan of the creative minds of designers and dreamers, I have started following Jason McDowell's posts on Instagram and Facebook, for the amazing amount of aviation oddities that have been dreamed up over the years.

    The current one was interesting in that it was an artist's recreation of a story told, and then one of the readers was able to find an actual photo of the concept.
    I'll share Jason's post here :


    Sometimes, you hear about aircraft types or aviation-related stories that were never documented with photos.
    A friend of mine told me about something he experienced first-hand while serving for the US Army over in Vietnam.
    He flew Cessna L-19 Birddogs over there, and described a time when he observed a fellow Birddog pilot taxi out with a Special Forces paratrooper slung underneath each wing.
    They'd apparently rigged an addition to their HALO harnesses that enabled them to be attached to the wing's hard points.
    The pilot had the ability to release the paratroopers and drop them from the wing, and each paratrooper had the ability to release themselves.
    They flew at position of attention, head first, and presumably loved every second.
    On takeoff the pilot reportedly snuck a peak out at the right wing's passenger, and said the guy grinned and gave him a little wave. He was apparently enjoying it immensely.
    If ever there was an event that should have been documented with a camera, this was it.
    Alas, no photos (to my knowledge) were ever taken.
    Wanting to share this with you wonderful people, I got together with my artist friend @marc_mpv , and we worked together to recreate the scene.
    Special thanks to Marc for his fantastic depiction, I hope you enjoy it.

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    An actual photo of my post from this morning! Many thanks to @aaryana76, who found this in a book and sent it to me.

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  32. #72

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    In the seventies you started hang gliding sitting upright on a swing seat. After a year, someone offered to loan me a prone (superman) harness although my glider was not rigged for it. I could only run so fast, then I threw myself over the bar and hucked it off Mansfield, tallest in Vermont. I'll bet that guy was grinning!
    What's a go-around?
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  33. #73

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    I was frustrated trying to get my feet back into the bags when transitioning to prone. Still was damn cool once I was comfortable with it.

  34. #74
    cubdriver2's Avatar
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    Awesome

    https://www.facebook.com/11004764375...9405/?sfnsn=mo

    Glenn

    PS, yes I bought a sweatshirt
    "Optimism is going after Moby Dick in a rowboat and taking the tartar sauce with you!"
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  35. #75
    Farmboy's Avatar
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    Facebook was a basket of fruit this morning.

    I’ve not been into RC’s, but this has the potential to be hilarious...


    https://youtu.be/FpVBoB6lr5E


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  36. #76
    Farmboy's Avatar
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    Although not far different from this fella in his 3/4 scale Eindecker.


    https://youtu.be/SGHqpReoCN4


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  37. #77
    Farmboy's Avatar
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    It began like any other May morning in California. The sky was blue, the sun hot. A slight breeze riffled the glistening waters of San Diego Bay. At the naval airbase on North Island, all was calm.

    At 9:45 a.m., Walter Osipoff, a sandy-haired 23-year-old Marine second lieutenant from Akron, Ohio, boarded a DC-2 transport (most likely an R2D-1, given that "DC-2" is a civilian designation--RAC) for a routine parachute jump. Lt. Bill Lowrey, a 34-year-old Navy test pilot from New Orleans, was already putting his observation plane through its paces. And John McCants, a husky 41-year-old aviation chief machinist’s mate from Jordan, Montana, was checking out the aircraft that he was scheduled to fly later. Before the sun was high in the noonday sky, these three men would be linked forever in one of history’s most spectacular midair rescues.

    Osipoff was a seasoned parachutist, a former collegiate wrestling and gymnastics star. He had joined the National Guard and then the Marines in 1938. He had already made more than 20 jumps by May 15, 1941.
    That morning, his DC-2 took off and headed for Kearney Mesa, where Osipoff would supervise practice jumps by 12 of his men. Three separate canvas cylinders, containing ammunition and rifles, were also to be parachuted overboard as part of the exercise.

    Nine of the men had already jumped when Osipoff, standing a few inches from the plane’s door, started to toss out the last cargo container. Somehow the automatic-release cord of his backpack parachute became looped over the cylinder, and his chute was suddenly ripped open. He tried to grab hold of the quickly billowing silk, but the next thing he knew he had been jerked from the plane—sucked out with such force that the impact of his body ripped a 2.5-foot gash in the DC-2’s aluminum fuselage.

    Instead of flowing free, Osipoff’s open parachute now wrapped itself around the plane’s tail wheel. The chute’s chest strap and one leg strap had broken; only the second leg strap was still holding—and it had slipped down to Osipoff’s ankle. One by one, 24 of the 28 lines between his precariously attached harness and the parachute snapped. He was now hanging some 12 feet below and 15 feet behind the tail of the plane. Four parachute shroud lines twisted around his left leg were all that kept him from being pitched to the earth.

    Dangling there upside down, Osipoff had enough presence of mind to not try to release his emergency parachute. With the plane pulling him one way and the emergency chute pulling him another, he realized that he would be torn in half. Conscious all the while, he knew that he was hanging by one leg, spinning and bouncing—and he was aware that his ribs hurt. He did not know then that two ribs and three vertebrae had been fractured.

    Inside the plane, the DC-2 crew struggled to pull Osipoff to safety, but they could not reach him. The aircraft was starting to run low on fuel, but an emergency landing with Osipoff dragging behind would certainly smash him to death. And pilot Harold Johnson had no radio contact with the ground.

    To attract attention below, Johnson eased the transport down to 300 feet and started circling North Island. A few people at the base noticed the plane coming by every few minutes, but they assumed that it was towing some sort of target.

    Meanwhile, Bill Lowrey had landed his plane and was walking toward his office when he glanced upward. He and John McCants, who was working nearby, saw at the same time the figure dangling from the plane. As the DC-2 circled once again, Lowrey yelled to McCants, “There’s a man hanging on that line. Do you suppose we can get him?” McCants answered grimly, “We can try.”
    Lowrey shouted to his mechanics to get his plane ready for takeoff. It was an SOC-1, a two-seat, open-cockpit observation plane, less than 27 feet long. Recalled Lowrey afterward, “I didn’t even know how much fuel it had.” Turning to McCants, he said, “Let’s go!”

    Lowrey and McCants had never flown together before, but the two men seemed to take it for granted that they were going to attempt the impossible. “There was only one decision to be made,” Lowrey later said quietly, “and that was to go get him. How, we didn’t know. We had no time to plan.”
    Nor was there time to get through to their commanding officer and request permission for the flight. Lowrey simply told the tower, “Give me a green light. I’m taking off.” At the last moment, a Marine ran out to the plane with a hunting knife—for cutting Osipoff loose—and dumped it in McCants’s lap.

    As the SOC-1 roared aloft, all activity around San Diego seemed to stop. Civilians crowded rooftops, children stopped playing at recess, and the men of North Island strained their eyes upward. With murmured prayers and pounding hearts, the watchers agonized through every move in the impossible mission.

    Within minutes, Lowrey and McCants were under the transport, flying at 300 feet. They made five approaches, but the air proved too bumpy to try for a rescue. Since radio communication between the two planes was impossible, Lowrey hand-signaled Johnson to head out over the Pacific, where the air would be smoother, and they climbed to 3,000 feet. Johnson held his plane on a straight course and reduced speed to that of the smaller plane—100 miles an hour.

    Lowrey flew back and away from Osipoff, but level with him. McCants, who was in the open seat in back of Lowrey, saw that Osipoff was hanging by one foot and that blood was dripping from his helmet. Lowrey edged the plane closer with such precision that his maneuvers jibed with the swings of Osipoff’s inert body. His timing had to be exact so that Osipoff did not smash into the SOC-1’s propeller.

    Finally, Lowrey slipped his upper left wing under Osipoff’s shroud lines, and McCants, standing upright in the rear cockpit—with the plane still going 100 miles an hour 3,000 feet above the sea—lunged for Osipoff. He grabbed him at the waist, and Osipoff flung his arms around McCants’s shoulders in a death grip.
    McCants pulled Osipoff into the plane, but since it was only a two-seater, the next problem was where to put him. As Lowrey eased the SOC-1 forward to get some slack in the chute lines, McCants managed to stretch Osipoff’s body across the top of the fuselage, with Osipoff’s head in his lap.

    Because McCants was using both hands to hold Osipoff in a vise, there was no way for him to cut the cords that still attached Osipoff to the DC-2. Lowrey then nosed his plane inch by inch closer to the transport and, with incredible precision, used his propeller to cut the shroud lines. After hanging for 33 minutes between life and death, Osipoff was finally free.

    Lowrey had flown so close to the transport that he’d nicked a 12-inch gash in its tail. But now the parachute, abruptly detached along with the shroud lines, drifted downward and wrapped itself around Lowrey’s rudder. That meant that Lowrey had to fly the SOC-1 without being able to control it properly and with most of Osipoff’s body still on the outside. Yet, five minutes later, Lowrey somehow managed to touch down at North Island, and the little plane rolled to a stop. Osipoff finally lost consciousness—but not before he heard sailors applauding the landing.

    Later on, after lunch, Lowrey and McCants went back to their usual duties.

    Three weeks later, both men were flown to Washington, DC, where Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox awarded them the Distinguished Flying Cross for executing “one of the most brilliant and daring rescues in naval history.”

    Osipoff spent the next six months in the hospital. The following January, completely recovered and newly promoted to first lieutenant, he went back to parachute jumping. The morning he was to make his first jump after the accident, he was cool and laconic, as usual. His friends, though, were nervous. One after another, they went up to reassure him. Each volunteered to jump first so he could follow.

    Osipoff grinned and shook his head. “The hell with that!” he said as he fastened his parachute. “I know damn well I’m going to make it.” And he did.

    This article originally appeared in the May 1975 edition of "Reader’s Digest."


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