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Thread: Building a Scratch Built Cub

  1. #121
    www.SkupTech.com mike mcs repair's Avatar
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    Those look better than pipers original ones.


    Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org

  2. #122
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    Looking good, as always John! Keep up the great work.
    Joe

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  3. #123
    Marty57's Avatar
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    Nicely done John ...... see you at Airventure.
    Marty
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    Psalm 36:7 "High and low among men find refuge in the shadow of His wing"
    www.marty2plus2.com
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  4. #124

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    Thinking about Airventure, can we get a tour of the shop? yes we know it is a busy week for you.
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  5. #125
    cdenora's Avatar
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    Hello John

    Your work is awesome, really getting exited to see the possibilities.

    Im thinking of starting a scratch build project my self, but dont really know how or where to start, I see you have some print out patterns, did those come out of some instructions ? or where can I find those templates ?
    Also curious do you have a list of materials available as to buy all the tubing in bulk ?
    Really hope you can help me out to get started.
    Best regards

    Chrsitian
    Quote Originally Posted by stknrddr View Post
    Lunch Time Aviation presents a builder's update: It's lunch time, so I thought I'd take a little time to provide my project update. Continuing with the Torque Tube assemblies, I have attached photos of the torque tube bearing mounts. I typically draw any flat steel parts on paper, then glue (spray adhesive) the paper template to the sheet, than cut out the part. Here I used a portable hydraulic punch I borrowed from work. I got lucky that the large hole I needed to punch was the same diameter as one of the punch and die sets we had. Electricians use these punches to punch holes in electrical panels. After punching, and cutting the part out using a cut off wheel or a sheet metal shear if applicable, we bent up the flanges, and assembled. In order to cut out the curved lines to fit to the bearing tube, I drilled a series of small holes just outside the line, then wiggled the scrap part away from the good part, followed by using the bench top grinder to smooth out the steel to the shape of the curved line. We fixture up the parts welded. My project partner has been doing the welding while I typically fabricate many of the parts and the fixtures. It works out well for us. We're building two cubs, so our combined interests works out well for both of us.
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  6. #126
    supercub's Avatar
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    Beautiful job, great workmanship. Please keep the updates coming, I always enjoy seeing a projects progress. Thanks for sharing.
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  7. #127
    stknrddr's Avatar
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    “Also curious do you have a list of materials available as to buy all the tubing in bulk ?
    Really hope you can help me out to get started.”

    Hello Christian,
    Thank you for the positive comments about my project. My friend Charlie and I are each scratch building two Super Cubs, and are sharing our skills for these projects. I really enjoy the scratch building process, however it does take considerable time, especially when we work on our projects infrequently.
    We are primarily using the original Super Cub drawings by Piper. We are using the Northland cd of drawings, and we also often reference Christian Storms helpful website Supercubproject.com to look up drawings. I want to credit Christian Sturms site where he fabricated the control sticks and torque tube, which helped me so much when building our assemblies.
    Regarding a list of tubing, I may still have a list, and I will look for it. We simply referenced the drawings, and created a list of tubing we needed, then ordered it. For a realativeyl small cost, a person can work for quit a while fabricating a fuselage and gear legs.
    if I were to make another, I would buy tail surfaces at AirVenture in the AeroMart tent (used parts) instead of fabricating these as there is always a supply of good pieces, at reasonable prices.
    Regarding my drawings I use for templates, I do have a file, however I lost the availability of AutoCAD software, so I’ve been lacking the capability to manage the files. I have been wanting to find a free source to use my files, and I have this on my list to do.
    I am currently away from home for a few days, which will delay me in looking through my files.

    I hope this helps,
    john


  8. #128
    cdenora's Avatar
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    John

    Thank you for the reply, any help is great, I am far far away , ( in mexico ) so I am pretty much on my own except for this forum. so this is why we really want to make sure we get a correct list of parts going because any mistake can cost us a lot of time and expense to get missing or wrong parts down here.

    Regards

    Christian

    Quote Originally Posted by stknrddr View Post
    “Also curious do you have a list of materials available as to buy all the tubing in bulk ?
    Really hope you can help me out to get started.”

    Hello Christian,
    Thank you for the positive comments about my project. My friend Charlie and I are each scratch building two Super Cubs, and are sharing our skills for these projects. I really enjoy the scratch building process, however it does take considerable time, especially when we work on our projects infrequently.
    We are primarily using the original Super Cub drawings by Piper. We are using the Northland cd of drawings, and we also often reference Christian Storms helpful website Supercubproject.com to look up drawings. I want to credit Christian Sturms site where he fabricated the control sticks and torque tube, which helped me so much when building our assemblies.
    Regarding a list of tubing, I may still have a list, and I will look for it. We simply referenced the drawings, and created a list of tubing we needed, then ordered it. For a realativeyl small cost, a person can work for quit a while fabricating a fuselage and gear legs.
    if I were to make another, I would buy tail surfaces at AirVenture in the AeroMart tent (used parts) instead of fabricating these as there is always a supply of good pieces, at reasonable prices.
    Regarding my drawings I use for templates, I do have a file, however I lost the availability of AutoCAD software, so I’ve been lacking the capability to manage the files. I have been wanting to find a free source to use my files, and I have this on my list to do.
    I am currently away from home for a few days, which will delay me in looking through my files.

    I hope this helps,
    john

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  9. #129

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    John,
    Working with a partner makes a lot of sense to me now. Another set of eyes and functional brain would have kept me from making some mistakes. You are absolutely right on the pile of raw materials thing. It will keep a guy busy for a long time cheaply if you enjoy the process. If you make an irreversible mistake, it goes in the trash a lot less painfully than wrecking a kit part. Your work is incredible by the way, keep the pictures coming.
    Christian,
    I started with the aluminum wings. Spars, drag wires, drag wire nipples, and hardware you will likely buy. Everything else is sheet stock and time. The hardest thing for me is the hardware, but that is my own fault. There is a pile of it. Rarely a local source for aircraft stuff. You pause a lot waiting for the right length bolts, rivets, washers, and nuts to come in the mail. If a guy changes nothing, wing hardware is a breeze, order it from a list created from members and available on this forum. Scratch building can be done, just not in a hurry.
    Thanks,
    Jim
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  10. #130

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    Good work. How many hours did the first fuselage take vs the second one?

  11. #131
    stknrddr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AMERI-CUB View Post
    Good work. How many hours did the first fuselage take vs the second one?
    Hi, Regarding time to build a second fuselage, we did not track hours specifically, however the second build is significantly easier and quicker than the first. My joke is that the first airplane is experimental, while the second is professionally built as we learn so much along the way.
    I tend to often do more thinking than building, and after a decision is made, and with a little experience, the second time around seems to go twice as fast.
    I hope this helps, and I hope to post more progress reports soon.
    john
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  12. #132

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    Torque Tube Mast 40212

    Does anyone have a drawing in the flat of part 40212. This is the mast for the torque tube. I was needing one to cut the mast from sheet metal.

  13. #133
    stknrddr's Avatar
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    An Over Due Scratch Building Update

    Work continues on my Super Cub project, slight as it has been.
    A lot of various tasks completed.

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    The D window frames have been welded in place. To date the window frames
    have beensome of the only purchased parts.


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    The rudder and brake pedals have been fabricated, however the re-enforcing plate
    for the heel brakes was needed.


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    I sheared and bent a piece of flat steel, then drilled holes using a step drill bit.

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    Using a dremel tool with a small cut off wheel, followed by filing the edges even
    and smooth makes for a clean part. Notched the ends to fit as needed.

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    Here, the re-inforcing plate is clamped in place with the heel
    brake pedals in place. Still need to drill holes to attach the brake pedals.Click image for larger version. 

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    Fabricated the Rudder Stops. These can be threaded if needed to
    insert a bolt for adjustments.Click image for larger version. 

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    Added a tube across the gear legs as a step.Click image for larger version. 

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    Fabricated and located the rearward fairlead brackets in place.
    Note that the wire rope and twine is temporary and will be replaced with AN wire rope.


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    Curved "Piper Channel" gets welded in place for the boot cowl to attach to.
    The Piper Channel is made by shearing and bending sheet steel.
    A lot of this stuff is needed.


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    To bend the radius on the Piper Channel into the correct shape, follow the blue prints.
    I swung an arc using a tape measure hooked to a screw head, to draw the
    correct radius onto plywood.

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    Simply bend the channel to match the arc drawn on the plywood,
    then cut to final length.

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    Used a framing square to line up the Piper Channel onto the fuselage.
    Charlie then welded it in place for me.

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    Finally add a couple of braces and spacers to hold it in place so the
    fabric does not distort it when shrunken in place.

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    Thank you for looking. More to come on a more frequent basis.
    John

  14. #134
    RVBottomly's Avatar
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    Thanks for the updates, John!

    Do you actually fabricate the Piper channel? I've bought it because it seemed too hard to produce efficiently.

  15. #135
    stknrddr's Avatar
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    Thanks for the updates, John!
    Do you actually fabricate the Piper channel? I've bought it because it seemed too hard to produce efficiently.
    Hi Vic,
    Yes, the Piper Channel was made using 1" wide strips of 4130, 0.020" or 0.025" thick (can't remember which). these came in 6 foot lengths from Aircraft Spruce.
    I placed a piece of masking tape on each end, and a piece at the center, marked a line 5/16" from each edge on the tapes, placed it in the break, bend, flip it around, bend, making sure to include generous radius' on the bends.
    I suggest to folks to cut a small length of material and bend up some samples, prior to bending 6 foot pieces. It does take some time, and it is hard to make the channels all look exactly the same, if needed to be the same.

    Thanks Vic, I like your building project and the boat you built,

    john
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  16. #136
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    Looks good John! Keep up the great work!!
    Joe

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  17. #137
    stknrddr's Avatar
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    Requesting thoughts on fabricating a home made wind shield for experimental Cubs?

    Does anyone have practical experience in fabricating a windshield for a PA-18 from scratch?

    The potential challenges I see are that the wind shield would not have a permanent set to it, making
    it more difficult to fit and to install.

    Are the purchased wind shields made so some cutting and fitting
    is required to accommodate any variances in final assembly and cowl shape?


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    Thanks for any thoughts on this one,

    john
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  18. #138
    tedwaltman1's Avatar
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    The guys on the Dark Aero project made their own windshield. Here’s the video where they talk about the windshield mold

    http://youtu.be/3XscUDvgD-Y
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  19. #139
    skywagon8a's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stknrddr View Post
    Are the purchased wind shields made so some cutting and fitting
    is required to accommodate any variances in final assembly and cowl shape?
    Seldom can a purchased windshield be dropped in without any cutting and fitting. Over the past 60 odd years of installing windshields in various airplanes, I can not think of even one which did not require cutting and fitting. Some more than others.
    N1PA
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  20. #140
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Yes, the windshields have extra material so they can be trimmed to fit. I don't think any, even the factory replacements, just drop in. It would be quite a challenge to make your own, and there is no need to do so. Buy one and trim to fit. Its all good.

    Best of luck

    Bill
    Very Blessed.
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  21. #141
    skywagon8a's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stknrddr View Post
    Requesting thoughts on fabricating a home made wind shield for experimental Cubs?

    Does anyone have practical experience in fabricating a windshield for a PA-18 from scratch?
    Another thought. Though I have never attempted to form a windshield, I have heat formed smaller pieces of plexiglass. Due to the size, shape, cost of materiel and steep learning curve I suggest that the cost of buying one all made from someone who does it for a living is very short money. You only need to crack one or distort it directly in your line of vision to create an expense higher than buying just one good one.
    N1PA

  22. #142
    Cub junkie's Avatar
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    About 2003 a friend and I took some molds for his biplane windshields to Airplane Plastics in Dayton,OH. It was only a two hour drive. The owner was kind enough to show us around his shop and it was an eye opener for us. We got to observe his crew making Van's canopies for side by sides that day. The process of the flat sheet coming out of the oven and carried to the male mold happened in seconds by workers that knew exactly what they were doing. After that huge piece of plex was where it needed to be they hooked up a vacuum hose and drew it down on the male mold perfectly. I have never seen so many vice grip #11's in my life. They use them on the outer ring to clamp the plex in place. All this takes place in seconds. I knew right then I was never going to be doing something like this even though I love to make airplane parts. I came home and planted rubber trees so I could make my own tires, it made more sense.
    Last edited by Cub junkie; 03-28-2020 at 09:10 PM.
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  23. #143
    stknrddr's Avatar
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    Lunch Time Aviation presents a Builders Update


    Baggage Area

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Although I incorporated the "Reverse Dog Leg" modification, I will likely enclose
    the baggage area with a sheet of plywood or Similar. I suppose I could change my
    mind to extend this area, or at least some of it before covering. I fabricated little
    brackets (tabs) to attach the plywood.

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    Here's a close up of the brackets (tabs). Notice a nut plate is riveted to
    each tab.

    Fire Wall Fabrication

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    I transferred the shape of the fire wall from the print to paper.

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    Cut out the paper shape and transferred to cheap plywood, in this
    case underlayment plywood. A person could also transfer the paper directly onto
    the steel sheet, however I wanted to be able to sand the long edges of the
    plywood straight, hopefully to result in a better fire wall final shape.

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    Using electric cutting shears (Milwaukee brand shown here), makes it easy to cut stainless sheet.
    I highly recommend using these.


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    Debur using a fine file and emery paper stapled to a wood block

    I plan to form a fire wall flange and attach it using rivets, next.
    I tried putting beads vertically on the firewall, but the bead roller I
    tried to used, couldn't form the bead well enough, so I'm
    omitting the beads (stainless steel fire wall...).

    Thank you for looking, but wait there's more:

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    And for fun, I included a couple of photos of my scratch built
    Pietenpol AirCamper project I built. Due to the Cub project, this
    project sets idle...

    Thanks for looking,

    John
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  24. #144
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    In that dog leg area I hinged the back baggage panel to the bottom floor and used a southco fastener at the top and can hinge it to lay down on the floor. But I put my elev. cables under the floor, so that is all a flat area, and that made it easy to do.
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  25. #145
    stknrddr's Avatar
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    Scratch Building my Super Cub Update

    Been working on the Upper Canopy Section, specifically the Bird Cage

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I built a short set of wings about 2' feet long, and clamped them
    in place onto the fuselage. These are being used to define the profile
    of the Bird Cage above the canopy.

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    I spanned the canopy section using temporary cross members
    to define the profile. Bending home-made piper channel into shape to
    match the airfoil worked well, then clamped the piper channel to the
    cross members. I aligned the piper channel (Bird Cage) pieces flush to the
    inside of the canopy tubes (canopy longerons) so any final interior covers
    will be flat. in this photo, the center piece of piper channel is not in place yet.

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    Another photo of the fixturing. Notice the second (Charlies) Super Cub project
    in the back ground, while we work on my Cub today.

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    Here's a photo of the Bird Cage on the right side of the fuselage.
    The first wing rib is also in view here.

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    A view from above and behind. The next photo will be the trailing edge
    of the Bird Cage fixture.

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    I used straight edges to emulate the way the fabric will lay
    on the fuselage while fixturing and welding the Bird Cage
    in place. Happily, the actual parts and placement are matching
    very well to the plans, indicating some accuracy.

    Thank you for looking!

    John
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  26. #146
    jnorris's Avatar
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    John, I couldn't figure out how you were going to put a canopy on a Super Cub. Then I realized you were talking about the skylight!
    Joe

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  27. #147
    stknrddr's Avatar
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    Builders Update
    - More on the Sly Light Area (Bird Cage)
    - Fuel Line Mock Up
    - Second Baggage Door


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    Here you can see the stringers now welded in place above the
    canopy (upper cabin, skylight section, bird cage,...)
    Notice the wing attachment fittings are not in place yet, so the
    leading end of the stringer is still free.

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    I sheared and bent my own piper channel, and this is the method
    I used to bend the air foil shape for the bird cage pieces.
    Pass the piece through the hole, and bend gently. If you feel the
    piece bend, you went too far. Gently!

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    Match the air foil shape to the ribs. Here, I have
    a bird cage stringer clamped to a rib.

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    Here you can see the out board stringers welded in place,
    and the center stringer clamped in place.
    Although I am not ready to weld the wing fittings on,
    I need to weld these stringers on, to continue to work on
    the turtle deck stringers, as the turtle deck stringers will
    fare into the bird cage stringers.

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    Back to this photo. I have the fuel valve location selected,
    and the valve is clamped into place per the Super Cub plans.
    I want to have minimal interior, and I may even omit the sheet
    metal tunnel over the throttle levers, but not sure yet. Here, I
    sort of mocked up the fuel line locations using small diameter
    pvc tubing.The fuel lines will be per plans using aluminum tubing.
    Heat and bend the pvc tubing to shape for mock up.

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    I framed up a second baggage door frame. I have the small
    baggage compartment right behind the rear seat, with the
    door low on the side of the fuselage. A small second area located
    above the longerons and aft of the original baggage area will be included.
    The wooden dowel is simply a mock up of the stringer location, and
    will be replaced with aluminum stringers.


    Click image for larger version. 

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    And for fun, a photo from New Holstein Super Cub Fly-In 2013

    thanks for looking,

    john
    Likes CharlieN, CamTom12, jrussl, jnorris, Jim A. liked this post

  28. #148
    stknrddr's Avatar
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    Builder's Update

    Heel Brake Pedal Brackets
    Turtle Deck Stringers
    Lower Door Seal Flange

    A few posts ago, I shared the fabrication process of the front heel brake reinforcing bracket. A spacer of sorts is needed between the bracket and the pedals themselves. Some planes use 1" aluminum or steel tubing for the spacers, while others use 1" wood blocks.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I elected to use wood blocks, however I laminated a three
    piece block with a clear pine inside with aircraft plywood on
    the outer sides. I'll bore out a big lighting hole prior to varnishing.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Laminating the blocks. Note I made enough for our two airplane projects.

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    Cut the blocks to shape on the table saw.
    More to follow later.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    A lot of options for turtle deck stringers including
    wood, extruded aluminum, rectangular aluminum tubing,
    carbon fiber,...
    I elected to use 3/4" diameter round aluminum tubing. Pretty light,
    readily available from a hardware store, I like the large radius it will
    provide as the fabric wraps around it, and relatively cheap.

    The only problem is that I could only find them locally in 8 foot lengths.
    I needed to lengthen them to 9'-9".

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I bought 3/4" diameter wood dowels, cut them
    to 12" lengths, and applied 3 coats of spar varnish to seal them.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I glued the dowel into one piece, let it dry, then
    glued the 21" long extension onto the assembly,
    and clamped the assembly to a straight edge.
    I would do the same again as this worked very well.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Here's a photo of how the aluminum stringer fits
    up nicely to the trailing end of the bird cage section.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    For door gap seals, I sheared a folded over a piece of 0.025"
    sheet steel. Charlie welded it to the door edges for me.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The flanges will be covered with fabric when the door
    gets covered. A foam seal can be added as well.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    And a photo from Supercub dot org New Holstein 2015

    thank you for looking

    john
    Likes jnorris, CharlieN, Jim A. liked this post

  29. #149
    stknrddr's Avatar
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    Builders Update

    Turtle Deck Stringers Attach Method to Cabin
    Floor Board Tabs under rear seat
    "D" Window Attachment Tabs
    Bonus Photo

    Considering that the turtle deck stringers are 3/4" dia. rigid aluminum tubing,
    while the cabin structure is steel, I need a method to firmly and cleanly
    attach the stringers to the cabin.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The image above shows how the stringers will fare into the cabin.
    A attachment method is needed on the left and right stringers.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I'll use a similar method as I used on the center stringer at
    the tail post, where a 5/8" dia. tube is welded to the tail post.
    I'm referring this as a "socket connection".
    The stringer simply slides onto the short post, and cotter pin
    or pull rivet will likely be added.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Here's a photo of the socket connection at the cabin where
    the left side stringer fares into the cabin. Likewise, a cotter
    pin or a pull rivet may be added.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Finally, the three stringers in place.
    I still need to bend in the trailing end of the left and right
    side stringers into the vertical stabilizer, and I need to attach
    the leading end of the center stringer to the cabin.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Recall I fabricated small saddles to attach the stringers to
    on each turtle deck bulk head. A pull rivet will be used for final attachment.
    To be clear this photo was taken when the fuselage was laying sideways,
    and this is a photo of the bulk head in rear of the fuselage directly
    in front of the tail post.


    Floor boards Tabs Under Rear Seat

    I'm considering the battery location to be under the rear seat, and
    potentially a small bin also under the rear seat to store of few small items.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Two small pieces of 1/4" Birch Plywood floor boards
    may set on these tabs. Two separate floor boards are
    needed sue to the elevator cables run down the center
    of the fuselage very close to the floor. A battery ground
    lug will be needed in this area as well.

    "D" Window Attachment Tabs

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Plexi-Glass window panels will be used, with an
    aluminum sheet metal trim piece covering the
    leading edge. The trim piece will also be used as
    a gap seal for the upper door (upper window if
    you prefer).

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Three tabs welded in place along the cabin posts. The plexi-glass
    will slide into the "D" window frame. A decorative trim
    piece will be bent to cover the outside of the post and tabs,
    with a small flange to serve as a gap seal for the upper door.
    The gap seal will likely include a small rubber bulb for the seal.
    Although two tabs are plenty to hold the parts, I added a
    center tab to keep the trim piece from flexing outward.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    A look at my project.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Bonus Photo - Supercub dot org member Joe Norris's
    Super Cub with Joe pushing it into the sun light.

    Thank you for looking!

    John
    Likes jnorris liked this post

  30. #150

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    Stringers,
    If most of the spring is out of the tube, I would consider not using the pop rivets in favor of a structural adhesive. This could be as simple as a structural contact adhesive such as used with the Stewarts fabric system or stronger if you need.
    Obviously the expansion rate is considerably different between the stringer and frame. I would be sure the tube can not walk off the end tube and utilize tie wraps to retain the bonded tube in the saddles till the fabric is going on.
    The adhesive should also provide the material separation to reduce the chance of the aluminum from corroding away.
    Thanks stknrddr, RVBottomly thanked for this post

  31. #151
    jnorris's Avatar
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    Looking good John! Thanks for the shout-out!
    Joe

    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat

  32. #152
    stknrddr's Avatar
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    Builders Update

    Making A Leather Control Stick Grip

    I decided to make leather control stick grips. I'm
    incorporating the traditional baseball stich pattern
    on them as well.

    I'll provide step by step photos of the procedure.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Select and cut leather to size to fit tightly around the stick.
    A straight edge and sharp utility knife works fine.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Mark the stitch hole locations along each edge of the leather grip.
    I came in about 1/8" for the first hole, then spaced remaining
    holes "about" 1/4" apart. Whatever hole pattern you chose,
    copy it on the opposite side. I used an awl to mark the hole locations.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I used a small drill bit (don't know what size), and a drill motor
    to cut the holes.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    A leather punch or other means may be suitable as well.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I am using artificial sinew for the thread material. This stuff
    appears to be a wax coated synthetic thread (flat cord). I like the way
    it looks similar to rawhide cord.

    I needed a needle to thread the cord through the holes. I made
    two needles using 0.032 Safety Wire. Cut wire to length, and
    fold it over the end of the wire around the cord, and crimp it
    tight to minimize bulk.
    I cut a piece of cord about three times the length of the grip, and
    attached a needle on each end.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I decided to incorporate a hole in the grip to accommodate
    a push to talk button. This grip is only a trial, and I'm still
    deciding exactly where to place the switch.
    I needed a leather punch of correct size. I sanded the outer
    side of a piece of 4130 tubing to a sharp edge. A couple of
    firm whacks with a ball peen hammer punched it through.


    Click image for larger version. 

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    Here's the punch through the other side.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The grip will be located over the switch.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Stitching the grip.
    Start at the top by passing each needle from outside to inside,
    then through the back of the next hole on the opposite side.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Continue threading the next holes down, from the back,
    on the opposite side. Pull tight as you go.
    To create a more decorative look, a person could use colored
    cord, and use two different colors of cord (two pieces of cord)
    and thread every other hole, so every other stich alternates color.
    I didn't make this up, I saw it when I researched how to do all of this.
    I'm staying with a utilitarian look, so plain cord is selected.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I cut small stitch holes resulting in the need to pull the
    needles through the holes using "needle nose" pliers.
    I only bled once during the entire process.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    A couple of stitches across the last holes, then simply
    pull tight, and tie off the cord on the underside.
    Snip the extra cord off.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Here's the switch side.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Here's the stitched side.

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    Side view.
    Making leather grips is not as hard as it may seem.
    It took me about 1-1/2 to 2 hours for the entire process.
    Give it a try if you like it.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Bonus Photo: Watching the SpaceX launch while working on the Cub.

    Thank you for looking.

    john
    Thanks Sam D thanked for this post

  33. #153

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    I'm building a horizontal stabilizer for exp PA-18 150. The last few inches of the outboard leading edge is squeeze to 3/8 " . Does anyone have recommend technique on accomplishing this withe the center line of the tube being maintained?

  34. #154
    stknrddr's Avatar
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    Bucrepus - Regarding your question:

    "I'm building a horizontal stabilizer for exp PA-18 150. The last few inches of the outboard leading edge is squeeze to 3/8 " . Does anyone have recommend technique on accomplishing this withe the center line of the tube being maintained?"

    I used approximately the same process as Storm Pilot did in his description below in a different post, however that I'll add that I usually use pieces of flat steel, and pieces long enough where the length of the flat steel extends beyond where you want the taper to start, so not have a little crease in the tube where you begin to pinch it. Adding a hinge is a great idea, which I did not do, I just played with the geometry.

    Here's Storm Pilots' reply which is the approximate procedure I used as well:

    "I used 2 short pieces of 1"x 4" maple cut to about 6" long to form a "V" in my vise. If you have a hinge handy you can fasten them together but if not just play with the geometry and it will work. Place the tube in the notch of the "V" align carefully and squeeze until the desired results are achieved. Cracking of the tube shouldn't be a problem since you wont be compressing the tube totally but if you have a torch you can also anneal the tube first to make it more malleable by heating the last 4" or so to a dull red and letting it cool slowly at room temperature before forming it."

    Good luck, it'll be great.

    john

  35. #155
    stknrddr's Avatar
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    Builders Update

    Upper Baggage Area Fiberglass Floor Panel
    Control Stick Grip - Part 2
    Bonus Photo

    I'm incorporating an upper baggage area aft of the traditional baggage area.
    I considered what type of floor to install, including a fabric sling, netting, plywood,
    and I settled on trying to fabricate a composite panel. Here's my process:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    First, a look at the finished panel setting in place.
    Other than repairing a smashed fiberglass Case tractor grill after a
    kid (not it) drove the tractor through a fence on the farm, this is my
    first attempt at making a fiberglass panel.


    Click image for larger version. 

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    I started with a flat work surface (counter top material), covered with
    plastic sheet (big garbage bag).
    The panel will consist of a 1/4" thick foam core, with a sheet of fiberglass
    epoxied to each surface.

    Foam used: 1/4' Divinycell Foam PVC - supplier is Aircraft Spruce
    Fiberglass Cloth
    Epoxy Resin and Hardener

    I cut the foam to approximate shape, laid fiberglass cloth neatly over it.
    Cut to fit.


    Click image for larger version. 

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    Mixed up resin and hardener. Equal pumps from each can.
    Mixed in a plastic cheese container.
    Followed directions.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Spread the resin mixture onto the surface using a wide plastic
    putty knife. Gentle movements at a 45 degree angle.
    Enough pressure to embed the resin into the cloth without
    leaving puddles or excess.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Trim the edges while the cloth is gummy and
    walk away to let dry.
    Apply cloth using same process on opposite side.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Make a paper template to cut the panel to shape.
    I drew lines on the panel.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I clamped an aluminum straight edge onto the panel
    to be used a fence to follow during cutting. Used a band saw
    to cut the panel straight on all four sides.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Added Piper Channel in the baggage floor area to ensure
    the panel would not sag. If something were to fall through
    or past the panel, the item would have direct contact with the
    control cables. I placed these little stiffeners about 9 or so
    inches apart. I was not confident that the panel would land on top
    of the longerons enough for proper support, so the little cross
    members were added.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Here's the panel in place. I will seal the edges using
    epoxy and Mico Ballons at a later time, and I will plan
    to post that process.
    I really happy with the results. The panel is firm, flat, and
    it looks appropriate.

    Control Stick Grip - Part 2

    Click image for larger version. 

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    One of my recent posts included the process to
    make a leather control stick grip. I supplemented the
    grip with a wood knob. My push to talk button is on
    the side of the knob (see previous post), so I will not
    have a button on top.
    Here I used a piece of maple wood for the knob. I cut it to
    round shape on a band saw, and stared sanding on a bench top
    belt sander, then by hand to make it smooth like glass.
    I cut and glued a wood insert on the bottom of the knob
    to fit snuggly into the steel tube (stick).
    I like it.

    Bonus Photo - Wisconsin from the Air

    Click image for larger version. 

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    A recent photo I took of a Wisconsin cranberry farm,
    located in north central Wisconsin.
    Wisconsin is the leading producer of cranberries, growing
    about 60% of the nations crop (says wiscran dot org).

    Thank you for looking,

    John

  36. #156
    jnorris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stknrddr View Post
    Bonus Photo - Wisconsin from the Air

    Click image for larger version. 

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    A recent photo I took of a Wisconsin cranberry farm,
    located in north central Wisconsin.
    Wisconsin is the leading producer of cranberries, growing
    about 60% of the nations crop (says wiscran dot org).
    I'm having flashbacks!
    Joe

    Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat
    Likes stknrddr, Bugs66 liked this post

  37. #157
    stknrddr's Avatar
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    Builders' Update

    Front Heel Brake Assembly
    Tail Section Panel Tabs
    Bonus Photos

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Currently working on the front heel brake assembly.
    Here I have the wood spacer blocks and brake pedals
    setting in place. The bolts are only miscellaneous,
    temporary, upside down hardware..., and will be replaced.
    The floor board is a mock up as well.
    Question: Is there any reason why the steel heel brake plate
    cannot be welded onto the fuselage? The plans call out bolting
    it to the floor board. I wonder if the plate may have been an
    addition, and not original to the plans?


    Click image for larger version. 

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    I am including a removable aluminum panel
    in the aft section, way back at the tailwheel are,
    on the bottom surface of the fuselage.
    Tabs are now fully welded in place.

    Bonus Photos
    Click image for larger version. 

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    New Holstein Super Cub Fly-In 2015

    I was in the area over the weekend, and stopped by the New Holstein, WI airport,
    home of the New Holstein Super Cub Fly-In.
    The framed photos related to the events
    shown below are hanging in the airport FBO.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Click image for larger version. 

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    Click image for larger version. 

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    Thank you for looking,

    john
    Likes CharlieN liked this post

  38. #158

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    I would weld the plates in.
    Regards, Charlie
    Super Coupe E-AB build in process
    Thanks stknrddr thanked for this post

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