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Thread: Onboard tool kit

  1. #1
    Ursa Major's Avatar
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    Onboard tool kit

    We've had a lot of discussions on survival kits and other stuff folks carry in their cubs, but I don't recall a thread that was specific to the tools people carry to make that repair that will get them home. I know of compact tool kits that the owners say will allow them to take the cub almost completely apart.

    Specifically, which tools (what size and type of wrenches) are the most important to carry. In addition to a small socket set and a screwdriver set,I carry a few nuts and bolts that will hopefully keep the gear attached and the exhaust system functional.
    I carry a plug socket and a couple of plugs as well as a few box end wrenches and safety wire and pliers. Hacksaw, hammer,duct tape, a few tie wraps and a couple of hose clamps have seemed sufficient so far. What other tools are important?

    Specific suggestions are most helpful. I'd rather carry only what is needed rather than carry a bunch of tools that are not required.
    Mike

  2. #2

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    Been discussed before.

    Ready Ratchet and an extension. Open end wrench set from 1/4" thru 3/4" plus a 1". Screwdrivers. File. Needle nose and water pump pliers. Vice grips. Safety wire pliers. Safety wire. Zip ties. Duct tape. Knife. Cotter pins. Spare quick drain. A few screws. Tire patch kit. A rag. I can do most airplane maintenance with what's in my kit. What I need and don't have usually gets added. Case in point, one of the most common field situations that'll require tools is to fix a flat tailwheel. Can you do it with your on-board tools? Try it. Or try to fix whatever else you think is likely to fail while away from home.
    Last edited by sierra bravo; 07-09-2013 at 12:57 AM.

  3. #3

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    Every time I work on my plane I try to use only the tools I cary in my plane tool bag. What I have found is you really don't need that much. If I added cylinder wrenches I could do everything including complete engine teardown. channel locks are nice for the big stuff, my ax will work as hammer.
    DENNY

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    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    From a previous post


    Tool Kit

    Got that done today. 13 pounds.

    Includes....

    Wrenches 1/4 to 9/16
    1/4 drive sockets - 1/4 to 9/16
    couple of socket extensions
    Spark plug socket and 3/8 drive using a 3/8 to 1/2 adapter
    9/16 socket (3/8 drive) for prop bolts
    Side cutters
    vice grips
    hammer
    screwdrivers
    crescent wrench
    hacksaw (small size)
    water pump pliers
    Have Leatherman in Survival vest


    Non tools but in the bag

    Safety wire
    Spark plug
    Gas Cap
    Duct Tape
    Rescue tape (Neat stuff .......http://www.rescuetape.com/)
    Zip ties
    electrical wire, connectors, fuses, test light
    two large hose clamps
    Scotchbrite and sandpaper
    Single edge razor blades
    coat hangar (it is amazing what all you can do with one, weighs little)
    spare float plugs
    baggie w/ JB weld, locktight, grease, WD40, sealant, hand cleaner (all small sizes))
    Baggie w/ misc hardware - bolts, nuts, washers, cotterpins, screws etc
    Surgical gloves
    Alternator belt (fixed on engine so I don't have to remove prop to put it on)

    Probably more than some would carry and less than others. I am open to ideas and suggestions. Most of this was taken from past threads. Thanks to Steve Pierce, StewartB and others.

    Bill
    Very Blessed.

  5. #5

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    Carrying proper tools is all well and good but where can I get a a good dehydrated mechanic to use 'em?
    Remember, These are the Good old Days!

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    Quote Originally Posted by OLDCROWE View Post
    Carrying proper tools is all well and good but where can I get a a good dehydrated mechanic to use 'em?
    Yeah, but then you still have to carry the water to re-hydrate him....
    "Why is it wives can't just accept the biological mystery of guns reproducing in gun cabinets, and let it go at that?" - Patrick F. McManus

  7. #7
    Ursa Major's Avatar
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    All good suggestions. A couple of other things I also carry is a shortened 5/8" box end wrench and a small plastic squeeze bottle of brake fluid. If I can keep from dropping the brake reservoir cap bolt under the floor boards when adding fluid, I can stop carrying a replacement bolt. BTW, Stewart what do you use the 1" wrench on? Oil filter?
    Mike

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    Yes, oil filter.

    Something else to consider is that your tools may get used for other things, too, like wheelers and boats that await at the destination. A 10/12mm wrench is handy for that.
    Last edited by sierra bravo; 07-09-2013 at 10:10 AM.

  9. #9
    N5126H's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DENNY View Post
    Every time I work on my plane I try to use only the tools I cary in my plane tool bag. What I have found is you really don't need that much. If I added cylinder wrenches I could do everything including complete engine teardown. channel locks are nice for the big stuff, my ax will work as hammer.
    DENNY
    Above is good advice. I try to carry the tools I need to do an annual inspection. Plus spare things like; seat rail clips, tail wheel clips and chain, cotter pins, safety wire, spark plug de-clinker, spare plug, electrical tape, hose clamp, bicycle tire pump and tire patch material, 1000MPH tape, parachute cord, quick drain fitting. All in a bankers money bag and it weighs about 5 lbs. Just like anything else use the stuff before you need it to make sure what you have works.

  10. #10
    Bill Ingerson's Avatar
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    I'm doing the same thing, every time I work on the plane I pull out the emergency tool bag. I try to do everything out of that kit that way I know what I need and where it is. Another habit I have done is use my emergency first aid kit for things that I want to do, some so simple like lite my BBQ for lunch. Well I had two new orange water proof match container's full of water proof matches, Not one match would lite from either of the two water proof containers, bought at sporting goods. So the next idea was using the flint and steel and it worked great. Carrey tools and Oil.

  11. #11
    Shooter's Avatar
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    Bill,
    I quit using matches several years ago. Bic makes small lighters that take a licking and keep on ticking. They are transparent so you can check your fuel reserve. They are very light. No pun intended but I'll take it. Safety wire is great but I can fix more things on the ranch, my tractor, dozer and plane with good ole bailing wire. It has worked for decades.

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    Blast Match. But that's survival gear, not tools. Bic lighters are worthless when wet.

  13. #13
    Shooter's Avatar
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    Sierra bravo,

    I see your a man of semantics. Question: is a axe a "tool" or "survival gear"? Matches are also worthless when wet. The lighter however, works again when it dries out. The matches don't. Actually the "blast match" is both. I use it as a work "tool" to close heat shrink on electical fittings, clean up loose ends on fabric and other miscellaneous uses. I also use it as a survival "tool" to light a fire. If you don't like the cheap "Bic" there are other more expensive military approved lighters that work in a wide variety of conditions, high winds and etcetera. I love this website. So many varied opinions, and a wealth of information. It also on occasion provides me with a real good laugh.

  14. #14

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    My axe is in my survival pack. I've never needed it to do maintenance or repairs on my planes.

    I spend lots of days in the wet and cold on purpose. 12-14 hours in waders or Hellys in the wind and rain is what I call a good day. I won't count on a Bic lighter on those days. I certainly won't trust one in a survival situation. I can recall lots of days where a couple of friends will stop mid-day to get a fire going to warm up and eat some lunch. It's pretty typical to see guys sitting around the fire trying to dry out their Bics so they can light a smoke later. A few guys here know what I'm talking about.

    The failure of soggy waterproof matches is rarely the match and usually the striker. Lighting a waterproof match or a wet Bic can be facilitated by a Blast Match.

  15. #15
    WindOnHisNose's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Fox View Post
    Yeah, but then you still have to carry the water to re-hydrate him....
    Brian, a condom with fix the water problem. A condom will carry one quart of fluid. This could be useful info for a survival situation, where you need to transport water from the river to your downed aircraft. It is for that reason that I suggest that young people always carry a condom...for that emergency situation...and hence an explanation for their parents.

    Rehydrating a mechanic...yet another use for a condom.



    Randy

  16. #16
    Bill Ingerson's Avatar
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    I better look into the Blast Match, Thanks Bravo. Randy, in high school we put a condom on a air-compressor line and put air in it, most amazing! It was like sitting there with a M-80 fire cracker in front of you and waiting for it to go off.

  17. #17
    SC3CM's Avatar
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    The only thing I have that hasn't already been mentioned is a good pair of work gloves.

  18. #18
    cubdriver2's Avatar
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    Gojo, I hate gloves

    Glenn

  19. #19
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    My tool bag pretty well resembles most here. Had a ready ratchet, but the plastic failed. Wonder if they make an all metal one? Went back to a small strip of real 3/8 drive sockets, driven by a stubby. A wrench will extend it if need be. Also used to carry a 6"crescent wrench for those time when you actually need two of the same size wrenches , but don't want to double up on every thing. Then once early on in a new engine I tried to drain the oil. I had not yet replaced the sump plug with a quick drain, and Western Skyways had one of those square drain plugs in it and I didn't have a square nut wrench in my bag... It was sooo tight nothing else would budge it, and any attempt would clearly round it off. A friend pulled a ford wrench from his tool kit and it made short work of the plug. Neither of these tools have much of a place in the real world of day to day aircraft maintenance , but being creative out in the sticks has made them worth the weight to me.

  20. #20
    Shooter's Avatar
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    sierra bravo,
    I don't know where you are, nothing is listed on your profile, but I will assume from the wet and cold your somewhere in the Northern climes. That's what I like about these threads. So many different perspectives from different areas. I'm in south Texas. We don't have cold and we rarely get rain or wet. It's 106 right now. Ten months last year without a measurable amount of rain. I duck hunt in a t-shirt over pumped water. You can see that I don't worry about wet. I have to admit I HAVE used an axe to dismantle parts from an aircraft. We use fire to cook over and stay warm during cold desert nights. Our concerns are more oriented to dehydrarion, sun/heat stroke. Always great reading a different perspective. I'm will assume a "Blast Match" is a brand name. I've never heard of it. Sounds like I need to start carrying a condom as Randy suggests in the next reply for emergency water retrieval. I don't think my wife is going to go for it though.
    Thanks tbone thanked for this post

  21. #21

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    Shooter,

    I'm Alaskan most of the time. Here's a video of the Blast Match. Available from Alaska Bush Wheels and lots of other sources.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...KzdSXH34#at=20

    Add an Esbit pocket stove and a fuel tablet and you can light a fire in a rain forest.
    http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&key...l_56hoxms8k7_e
    Last edited by sierra bravo; 07-10-2013 at 04:30 PM.
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  22. #22
    SteveE's Avatar
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    I has TSA steal my blast match.

  23. #23
    Bill Ingerson's Avatar
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    Steve, They got $35.00 worth of my fishing lures also. Still in the package

  24. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveE View Post
    I has TSA steal my blast match.
    and what on God's green earth ever made you think anything with the name "BLAST" in the title would be okie-dokie with TSA to carry on?
    Remember, These are the Good old Days!

  25. #25
    Ruffair's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveE View Post
    I has TSA steal my blast match.
    I would have loved to have heard your explaining why you carried it.
    Ha ha.
    Kem

  26. #26
    Shooter's Avatar
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    Thanks sierra bravo. Appears to be an excellent product.

  27. #27

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    FWIW, UST now sells a smaller Blast Match. The "Sparkie" is a one-handed smaller version of the Blast Match that is selling for under $10. With the spark rod stowed it's about as big as a Bic lighter.

  28. #28

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    just as people have said use your survial tools to work on your plane. but dont stop there, find those tools that do the same job as 3 then ditch those other three. being a 115 lb backpacker weight vs worth is something ive learned over time.
    some of my emergancy mechanic/survival stuff. (if im flying local i wouldnt carry most of this)
    1. combination base nut wrenches cuts wrench weight in half
    2. starter fluid has endless uses from finding intake leaks to filling tubless tires to degreasing
    3. 3 o-rings of every size.
    4. TWO spark plugs. (know of more than one fouled plug that fouled the second plug only to have that second plug foul the new plug. cold cylinder gone rich thing)
    5. para cord.
    6. .020 and .o4o saftey wire
    7. bic lighter and propane torch. bics dry out just fine if you shake them upside down enough.... even in rain after dropping them in a puddle. take it from a smoker. and propane kicks the crap out of any other wet weather fire starter.
    8. tire repair patches and "worms" with a compact hand pump
    9. short handle socket wrench with exension
    10. gorilla tape
    11. j.b. weld and cyanoacrylate glue. (that means the really good super glue)
    12. electrical wire, connectors, volt meter, zip ties, alligator clips.
    13. high quility long handel wire cutter.
    14. razer blades
    15. coffee can
    16. a few sheet metal and machine screws of every applicable size
    17. step drill
    18. tip changeing screw driver that has a FIXED shaft, light and magenet.
    19. LED flash light.
    20. the biggest survival blanket you can find
    21. hammer ax.
    22. round and flat file and sand paper (3M "purple" variety pack)
    23. high temp RTV.
    23. a few hose clamps. heard of a montana cub gear that was "fixed" with a split tube, hose clamps, and j.b.weld.

    24. HALON fire extinguisher, powder extinguishers destroy more than they save in alot of cases....i still need to get this one.
    25. 2 high quility double pulleys. you can move a alot with 90-150 lb para cord and 2 tiny double pulleys.
    26. allen wrench's
    27. sewing needle
    28. single man brake bleeder.

    thats my basic list + or - a few items

    and so on.
    Last edited by bogey; 09-11-2013 at 02:53 AM.
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  29. #29

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    just as people have said use your survial tools to work on your plane. but dont stop there, find those tools that do the same job as 3 then ditch those other three. being a 115 lb backpacker weight vs worth is something ive learned over time.
    some of my emergancy mechanic/survival stuff. (if im flying local i wouldnt carry most of this)
    1. combination base nut wrenches cuts wrench weight in half
    2. starter fluid has endless uses from intake leaks to filling tubeless tires. to degreasing
    3. 3 o-rings of every size.
    4. TWO spark plugs. (know of more than one fouled plug that fouled the second plug only to have that second plug foul the new plug. cold cylinder gone rich thing)
    5. para cord.
    6. .020 and .o4o saftey wire
    7. bic lighter and propane torch. bics dry out just fine if you shake them upside down enough.... even in rain after dropping them in a puddle. take it from a smoker. and propane kicks the crap out of any other wet weather fire starter.
    8. tire repair patches and "worms" with a compact hand pump
    9. short handle socket wrench with exension
    10. gorilla tape
    11. j.b. weld and cyanoacrylate glue. (that means the really good super glue)
    12. electrical wire, connectors, volt meter, zip ties, alligator clips.
    13. high quility long handel wire cutter.
    14. razer blades
    15. coffee can
    16. a few sheet metal and machine screws of every applicable size
    17. step drill
    18. tip changeing screw driver that has a FIXED shaft, light and magenet.
    19. LED flash light.
    20. the biggest survival blanket you can find
    21. hammer ax.
    22. round and flat file and sand paper (3M "purple" variety pack)
    23. high temp RTV.
    23. a few hose clamps. heard of a montana cub gear that was "fixed" with a split tube, hose clamps, and j.b.weld.

    24. HALON fire extinguisher, powder extinguishers destroy more than they save in alot of cases....i still need to get this one.
    25. 2 high quility double pulleys. you can move a alot with 90-150 lb para cord and 2 tiny double pulleys.
    26. allen wrench's
    27. sewing needle
    28. single man brake bleeder.

    thats my basic list + or - a few items

    and so on.

  30. #30
    Crash's Avatar
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    I used to carry a big 10 lb tool kit. My planes are well maintained and I found I rarely ever used it. I got one of these with the addition of some safety wire and a small pair of Vise Grip pliers and get along OK at under 2 lbs. It's a Motion Pro "American V Twin" tool kit.

    http://www.motionpro.com/motorcycle/partno/08-0173/

    "A heavy Cub is a dangerous Cub"

    Crash
    Last edited by Crash; 09-11-2013 at 04:04 PM.

  31. #31

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    Crash,

    Life must be easy when you can park in front of your tool shed. Your strip looks good (especially since it's dry). Some of us still have to work on Rangers and 4-wheelers and boats when we land.

    SB
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  32. #32
    Crash's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sierra bravo View Post
    Crash,

    Life must be easy when you can park in front of your tool shed. Your strip looks good (especially since it's dry). Some of us still have to work on Rangers and 4-wheelers and boats when we land.

    SB
    I have a basic set of tools at my cabins for maintaining 4 wheelers, sno-gos, etc. Also have Honda and Yamaha stuff so that may also be the difference.

    Anyway, in all my years of flying out in the bush, I've never had a major mechanical where I needed a complete set of tools to fix it. Do a good complete annual and your field maintenance should be ZERO. Carrying all this "just in case" stuff will make your plane real heavy and negate the reason for flying a Cub.

    Take care,

    Crash
    Thanks AKlindy thanked for this post

  33. #33
    irishfield's Avatar
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    I'm pretty much with Crash these days. I carry minimal tools and a couple of spare spark plugs. A small calibre rifle, small hatchet / buck knife kit and not much else. That's what the pre programmed button on my Spot is for... that says "airplane won't start.. get xxxxxxxxairways to come get me with booster pack". That way wife isn't worried how badly me or the bird is bent up... and just thinks it won't crank!

  34. #34
    akavidflyer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by irishfield View Post
    I'm pretty much with Crash these days. I carry minimal tools and a couple of spare spark plugs. A small calibre rifle, small hatchet / buck knife kit and not much else. That's what the pre programmed button on my Spot is for... that says "airplane won't start.. get xxxxxxxxairways to come get me with booster pack". That way wife isn't worried how badly me or the bird is bent up... and just thinks it won't crank!

    I programmed mine to send out " I did something stupid but I am ok, come get my dumb ass" I like your line better to keep them from worrying!

  35. #35
    cubflier's Avatar
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    My tool kit centers around fixing the damage I can do and not about doing the maintenance I should have done in my hangar.

    All though I'm a minimalist when it comes to extra weight in the plane, I like to be able to fix a prop and fix a slice in a tire as minimum. I've had to do those things. Getting a slightly bent cub home without the use of helicopter ride is a nice option so duct tape, ring clamps and safety wire seem to be under my seat a lot. It all depends on how far I will be from help as to what I will bring just in case.

    Speaking of extra weight, I notice we spend money and effort on lightening our aircraft while we make little or no effort lighten our bodies. How many of us have a least a 10 lb tool kit on our waist at all times?

    Jerry
    If it looks smooth...it might be

    If it looks rough...it is!!

  36. #36
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    Along with tools, tire patch kit for the bushwheels, and a spare tail wheel tube I keep intake and exhaust gaskets, studs, bolts, screws, cotter pins, extra fuel cap, and about 3 oz of 5606 hyd fluid in my tool kit. It's all kept to a bare minimum and light as possible.

    Survival gear is something different and 99% of it is kept in a vest I wear.



    Jason

  37. #37
    Lowrider
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    Zippo and fluid. I never could get my sleeping bag into my vest
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

    There are no new ways to crash an airplane no matter how hard you may try!

  38. #38
    nanook's Avatar
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    Forget carrying all that crap around. Use a Sat phone to call your mechanic with a Super Cub. If you don't have that option then you better get with it.
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  39. #39

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    The ready ratchet isn’t available for purchase as far as I’ve seen on the internet.
    Thanks kevind thanked for this post

  40. #40

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    Ready Ratchets were discontinued several years ago. Sometimes good products go by the wayside.

    Click image for larger version. 

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