Page 73 of 78 FirstFirst ... 23637172737475 ... LastLast
Results 2,881 to 2,920 of 3097

Thread: Oops, darn it...

  1. #2881
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK.
    Posts
    3,856
    Post Thanks / Like
    With PP certification crossing the $14,000 threshold I seriously doubt it can be added to the standard training syllabus. And as noted - to be taught by whom? Yet another glass eyed pilot that fears unknown terrain and never lowers beyond safe gliding distance? Denny's question is valid. 50 yrs ago there was a license to learn. I don't recall being offered MVFR or even IFR training. That was my responsibility to proceed if motivated or scared into motivation.

    Do we advertise for a MVFR class? That might work if supported by GoPro real imaging reinforced by advanced pre-flight planning. At least the tools for survival and turn-around skills could be made available. But look at Part 135 ops. Daily exposure and advanced training can lead to what? The regs are written with their blood (and the blood of Part 91 and 121'ers as well).

    It comes down to personal risk assessment and survival skills. If that can be taught there might be a chance for some of the new pilots.

    Oh, and when someone can explain how to determine the distance from clouds w/o touching them let me know.

    Gary
    Last edited by BC12D-4-85; 07-20-2022 at 11:27 PM.
    Likes DENNY liked this post

  2. #2882
    aktango58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    18AA
    Posts
    9,852
    Post Thanks / Like
    For training purposes, especially dealing with bad weather, paper charts have some advantages. I love having moving map for my day to day work, GPS saves thousands in fuel at the end of the year... BUT:

    Open up a paper chart and you can see where rivers come from and go. Also, as MTV says, people can freeze in bad weather and their thought process goes awry. The GPS terrain feature flashing red all time when in the scud to me is a hinderance, I know I am within 300' of the ground, and trying to get out of it, but it keeps going red and yellow, flashing- so instead of looking out I am trying to find the button...

    But in learning it is good for students to learn to look at the big picture which a chart can show easier I believe. 50 miles north are these mountains, and rivers coming south out of them so water flows that way. Look west twenty miles and there is a lake with an airport by it- turn west and find the lake, now which way do I turn to the airport.

    If you don't know the basics of reading a chart, the GPS can get you into more trouble with the direct go to and nearest functions. Sometimes around here the nearest airport is the other side of a 3,000' pass; pilots need to think.

    I often have my iPad with me to back up or help with the GPS to save time and money. But, there are times I just look out the window and fly to the destination- and I will pull out a paper chart quite often just to verify something, or look at an elevation really quick.
    I do notice many pilots like their backup gps to back up the back-up to the primary back-up for the primary GPS, and all of them on a different mount hanging above the panel in easy pilot view. That is great, but remember when you have more than 1 mile vis it is Visual, so you need to be able to look outside and see the other planes that are flying to avoid them.

    Another long day tomorrow, probably fighting weather again. Glad I was taught how to calculate time/distance to visibility, and how to watch cloud movement to assess what is happening ahead of me. The old guys that taught us how to judge and stay alive were not easy to deal with at times, but their lessons were very important.
    I don't know where you've been me lad, but I see you won first Prize!
    Thanks BC12D-4-85 thanked for this post
    Likes skywagon8a, Waldo M, DENNY, Brandsman liked this post

  3. #2883
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK.
    Posts
    3,856
    Post Thanks / Like
    Maybe it's as simple as remain VFR. Don't fly MVFR or IFR unless prepared and current. Prepared? Well that's the topic isn't it?

    Edit: We should explore whether or not "experience" can be taught. Someone well versed in that discipline might offer a comment or perspective.

    Gary
    Last edited by BC12D-4-85; 07-21-2022 at 12:09 AM.
    Likes aktango58 liked this post

  4. #2884
    TVATIVAK71's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    ANC
    Posts
    129
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by aktango58 View Post
    The old guys that taught us how to judge and stay alive were not easy to deal with at times, but their lessons were very important.
    That’s an understatement……….nothing like getting paid to scud run with no gps or sometimes an old Apollo loran (if you were lucky to have one) with the red LED bearing and track (that usually quit in heavy precipitation). AND getting harsh critiques from a few of those old timers. It’s funny how some were loudmouths but when their voice was serious many of us young guys listened VERY closely to their advice.


    I agree with Gary. Just stay VFR……..The PPL training includes going over WX and forecasts. Don’t do marginal weather stuff unless properly equipped and trained. Even then a low weather look see can turn in more than one can chew. It’s unfortunate that gentleman lost his life that day. I’ve been in that same predicament and made it out alive. In my case my ego was my demise. It’s an unnerving overwhelming dark feeling of dread when you know you really screwed yourself and your life may end soon.

    I was quiet and apparently not acting normal after that experience. When one of the the “old timers” said I look like someone who’s lost his sh#t. Looked me in the eye and said “Art, I really hope you learned something”.

    Nobody had a marginal weather training program back then. Oh wait I guess we did……..on the job.
    Thanks BC12D-4-85 thanked for this post
    Likes DENNY liked this post

  5. #2885
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK.
    Posts
    3,856
    Post Thanks / Like
    My airport neighbor and mentor Jim Webster (26K+ hr pilot) told me once while flying a Goose for Weber in Ketchikan, he flew around an island twice thinking he was making headway towards a village before he recognized the visibility problem. He died at Teshepuk Lake near Barrow in May 2020 while turning close to terrain allegedly in a flat light flight at night.

    Even the best die young. Now how do we propose to teach the young to accept that challenge and avoid/overcome? Stay VFR is my recommendation.

    Gary
    Likes supercrow liked this post

  6. #2886
    stewartb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Wolf Lake, AK
    Posts
    7,587
    Post Thanks / Like
    If I select the chart view for Garmin Pilot I can zoom out and see the entire State of Alaska with no page borders. I can zoom in and scroll in any direction to whatever I’m looking for. With a simple tap of a finger I can switch that view to the familiar topo format and view areas or routes in that format. Can’t do that with paper. However you look it it we’re viewing information. The computer (gps, glass panel, iPhone) provides more of it in a more versatile package. If a guy can’t operate a device in a stressful situation he lacks training and/or familiarity with the device.

    PS- I really like synthetic vision, too. My primary flight instrument view on my G3X is overlaid on synthetic vision. I rarely look at the moving map view. I usually keep the iPhone on the moving map screen and rarely use it, but it’s nice to glance at when vis is down, like when flying into the sun in smoke. In my steam gauge plane the iPad remains in moving map. I’ve never needed synthetic vision on that screen. My honest opinion of the utility of the information format between the two planes? Advantage G3X. No question about it.
    Thanks Airguide thanked for this post
    Likes Utah-Jay, Delta Cub, Narwhal liked this post

  7. #2887
    stewartb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Wolf Lake, AK
    Posts
    7,587
    Post Thanks / Like
    Two Cub crashes. One Beaver crash caught on video. Busy week.

    https://www.avweb.com/aviation-news/...e-crash-video/

  8. #2888
    aktango58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    18AA
    Posts
    9,852
    Post Thanks / Like
    And the Sheep Air Force heads out the end of next week to begin the 'busy' season.
    I don't know where you've been me lad, but I see you won first Prize!
    Likes BC12D-4-85, toklat$1 liked this post

  9. #2889
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK.
    Posts
    3,856
    Post Thanks / Like
    Local ATP watched the Beaver at Lake Hood. Appeared to stall or loose lift, but then only the pilot knows for sure. Big load for the Katmai area. Nobody wins in a challenge like that.

    Gary
    Thanks toklat$1 thanked for this post

  10. #2890
    Speedo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    TN
    Posts
    1,839
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by BC12D-4-85 View Post
    Local ATP watched the Beaver at Lake Hood. Appeared to stall or loose lift, but then only the pilot knows for sure. Big load for the Katmai area. Nobody wins in a challenge like that.

    Gary
    The winds were gusting out of the southeast all day the day of the accident. I took off on 25L at PANC several times during the day and was just getting beaten up. It was not fun flying.
    Speedo
    Thanks BC12D-4-85 thanked for this post

  11. #2891
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK.
    Posts
    3,856
    Post Thanks / Like
    ^^^^That's what the obs reported as well. Tough spot to get hammered in a heavy SES at low airspeed.

    Gary

  12. #2892

    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    188
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by stewartb View Post
    Two Cub crashes. One Beaver crash caught on video. Busy week.

    https://www.avweb.com/aviation-news/...e-crash-video/
    Any intel on the cub crashes? I spotted a bent plane on a strip I intended to land on yesterday, but couldn't land to verify nobody inside. Ended up calling the RCC to report it, figured nothing came of it since I didn't see anything in the paper. Still, can't help but be curious.

  13. #2893
    akavidflyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Soldotna AK
    Posts
    309
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Any intel on the cub crashes? I spotted a bent plane on a strip I intended to land on yesterday, but couldn't land to verify nobody inside. Ended up calling the RCC to report it, figured nothing came of it since I didn't see anything in the paper. Still, can't help but be curious.
    ADN has an article. One by Tustumena lake with 2 on board, one by chakachamna with 1 on board. Nat guard picked up the peeps from both.

  14. #2894
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK.
    Posts
    3,856
    Post Thanks / Like
    'Tis the season for adventure aviation - Pay attention!

    Gary

  15. #2895
    stewartb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Wolf Lake, AK
    Posts
    7,587
    Post Thanks / Like
    Odd place for that Beaver to end up. That route takes the planes over the E-W channel, not the slow taxi channel. Why didn't he keep nose to the wind for the normal route? Nobody who flies at Hood is unfamiliar with the SE winds. It doesn't make sense to me, but I guess accident videos rarely do. I'm happy the results weren't worse.
    Last edited by stewartb; 07-28-2022 at 02:45 PM.

  16. #2896
    cubpilot2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska
    Posts
    849
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by stewartb View Post
    Odd place for that Beaver to end up. That route takes the planes over the E-W channel, not the slow taxi channel. Why didn't he keep nose to the wind for the normal route? Nobody who flies at Hood is unfamiliar with the SE winds. It doesn't make sense to me, but I guess accident videos rarely do. I'm happy the results weren't worse.
    We waited all morning to launch the cubs but held off due to the SE winds running anywhere from 10 to 16 at about 190 which isn’t the worst but it occasionally would swing to 250 gusting into the 20s.

    That swing in direction was the concern I had, as your quartering headwind can turn to a sudden gusting tailwind.

    My 2 cents worth on the Beaver accident is that he was hit by a strong gust as he lifted off, which drifted him over the slow taxi canal. A stronger gust shifted to his tail while at slow speed and lost his lift.

    In the video you see the tail drop. My thinking is that was when the gust hit him.
    Ed
    Thanks Bowie thanked for this post
    Likes DENNY liked this post

  17. #2897
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK.
    Posts
    3,856
    Post Thanks / Like
    Not many options there once airborne. Lower the nose maybe, the rest is luck.

    Gary
    Thanks jrussl thanked for this post

  18. #2898

    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    188
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by BC12D-4-85 View Post
    Not many options there once airborne. Lower the nose maybe, the rest is luck.

    Gary
    Lower the nose for sure. I hate second guessing other pilots - I can't say that I would have done better in that situation - but it sure looked like the stall warning signs were there. Amazing there were no fatalities.
    Likes skywagon8a, cubpilot2 liked this post

  19. #2899
    frequent_flyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2021
    Location
    Arizona, USA
    Posts
    962
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by stewartb View Post
    Odd place for that Beaver to end up. That route takes the planes over the E-W channel, not the slow taxi channel. Why didn't he keep nose to the wind for the normal route? Nobody who flies at Hood is unfamiliar with the SE winds. It doesn't make sense to me, but I guess accident videos rarely do. I'm happy the results weren't worse.
    Don't know the site but the video appeared to show a low altitude downwind turn. While the experts know the dangers of downwind turns are mythical I have never accepted that. At low altitude the movement of the aircraft over the ground is a strong input to the pilot's senses whether he wants it to be or not.

    Not much doubt the aircraft stalled while there was still altitude available for acceleration. I saw no attempt to lower the nose.
    Likes courierguy liked this post

  20. #2900
    courierguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Inkom, Idaho
    Posts
    2,157
    Post Thanks / Like
    "At low altitude the movement of the aircraft over the ground is a strong input to the pilot's senses whether he wants it to be or not."

    Agreed, but it can be dealt with, and is no reason to blame the wind.

    I've gotten into a few internet squabbles about turning "downwind." Most recently on a crash in a large RC sailplane, that simply turned downwind too close to the ridge and then stalled. Several "experts" weighed in on the wind being the cause, I opined that it was loss of airspeed and being too close to the ridge. Kind of the same thing, but not really of course. I was also told to NEVER turn into the ridge when ridge soaring, "everybody knows that!" Again, I said into the ridge downwind turns are perfectly safe, with adequate room and a maintained airspeed. Then there was a pilot on the Av Web newsletter...., I'm amazed on how often this myth pops up to this day, and I can't help mouthing off about it! It gets perpetuated every time a crash like this Beaver one happens, the cause wasn't turning downwind, the cause was loss of airspeed with not enough room to drop the nose and gain some (though it looked like he could have, but having zero Beaver time I'll digress.) But I do have a lot of hang glider and UL time, very close to ridges while soaring (yeah I know, said it here before) but maybe that's why I get fired up when I hear the myth repeated once again. It's kind of like saying "the crash was caused by too much air in the fuel tanks."
    Thanks JeffP thanked for this post
    Likes bcone1381 liked this post

  21. #2901
    stewartb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Wolf Lake, AK
    Posts
    7,587
    Post Thanks / Like
    For the unfamiliar, the standard route has planes fly over the E-W channel outbound, which is the stretch of water closest to the camera. Most pilots will clean the plane up while staying low and gathering speed down that channel and then climb once over Lake Spenard. Gusty southeast winds and the subsequent mechanical turbulence are common. Airspeed is life. Nothing about this video makes sense to guys that fly Lake Hood. I have no doubt a gust hit the plane. I have every doubt that a gust caused the accident. As an air taxi pilot friend told me yesterday, this hurts every operator at Hood, not just Regal.
    Thanks cubpilot2, vj88 thanked for this post
    Likes WayneK49, BC12D-4-85, DENNY, Troy Hamon liked this post

  22. #2902
    aktango58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    18AA
    Posts
    9,852
    Post Thanks / Like
    Very sad. The plane launched out of the water like a scalded cat and rocketed up to altitude in record time... where it appears to have run out of energy.

    Even in the wheel 206's I was beating it into our pilots (when room and terrain allow)- to stay low to the runway and let that airspeed build well above Vy before climbing out. Most flights are paid to go from point to point- the faster you travel across the ground, the better for the bottom line. Higher speed on climb cools the engines, gives you some room for gusts, and can get you there faster.

    Stewart, I have the same questions... why would someone climb and turn so fast, (Chandelle?), instead of utilizing the waterway to the east to gain speed/altitude. These accidents tend to put fear into the traveling public, and business suffers.

    Godspeed to everyone involved. Sad all around.
    I don't know where you've been me lad, but I see you won first Prize!

  23. #2903
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK.
    Posts
    3,856
    Post Thanks / Like
    No expert in DHC-2's. Back in 1977 I flew one on wheel skis and then floats for a summer. Checkout involved lots of various stalls. I recall them being brisk, especially with flaps. Don't recall the rudder's effectiveness. It was rolloff and looking at the moose time until recovered with lots of weight and drag involved. I've heard the STOL kits and VG's can help.

    Someone at the airport mentioned they can torque roll when slow. Big prop and engine. Don't know.

    Gary
    Last edited by BC12D-4-85; 07-29-2022 at 11:01 PM.

  24. #2904

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Illinois & Wisconsin
    Posts
    892
    Post Thanks / Like
    It was startling how nose high the Beaver was from the moment it appeared in view. What do you suppose the climb angle was?

    Nose low if you want to go; nose high if you want to die.

    Tragic, whatever the cause. IMO: exceeded aft cg limits or very bad piloting skills. No offense intended.
    Likes TurboBeaver liked this post

  25. #2905
    TurboBeaver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Northern Maine
    Posts
    1,067
    Post Thanks / Like
    Classic case of a Cessna pilot flying a Beaver...... If you want to go UP with a Dehaviland wing: pump flaps down more, if you want to go DOWN pull nose up more. The airplane beged him to lower the nose....... He never did. Glad he didn't kill everyone. When the first wing buffet to stall all he had to do was drop the nose level and push both levers all the way forward and he had plenty of altitude to save that Beaver........ Horrible mistake imho.
    Looks like a classic "low time in a Beaver" mistake from the movie. They are extremely luck it turned out as well as it did. Trying to blame this on the wind is BS excuse....... Look at water surface in the high speed channel? It wasn't
    THAT windy.......jmo
    E

  26. #2906
    S2D's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    4,277
    Post Thanks / Like
    Downwind turn to boot !!!!!
    Thanks Bowie thanked for this post
    Likes Airguide, TurboBeaver liked this post

  27. #2907

    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    35
    Post Thanks / Like
    agree with that downwind turn loaded

  28. #2908
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK.
    Posts
    3,856
    Post Thanks / Like
    Not recalling much about a Beaver stall (45 yrs ago) I looked up a couple threads from Canada>

    http://www.avcanada.ca/forums2/viewtopic.php?t=119645
    http://www.avcanada.ca/forums2/viewtopic.php?t=121744

    "In the controlled conditions of certification, the stalling of the DHC-2 was described as gentle. However, as is the case for many other aircraft, a stall in a steep turn under power triggers an Incipient spin with few or no signs of an impending stall, and the flight path changes from horizontal to vertical. In low-altitude flight, stalling followed by incipient spin, no matter how brief, prevents the pilot from regaining control of the aircraft before impact with the ground."

    I guess the best aid is rigorous training with exposure to maneuvers when loaded, configured, and under power.

    Gary

  29. #2909
    mvivion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Bozeman,MT
    Posts
    12,266
    Post Thanks / Like
    I was checked out in the Beaver by a very experienced deHavilland pilot. We did lots of stalls, plus executing quite steep turns. His mantra was: “Never try to turn a Beaver close to the ground without a good bit of flap deployed.” His point was a lot of pilots killed themselves in Beavers going into a pass and not configuring the plane prior to a turn. Takes some monkey motion to lower flaps: select flaps down, then start pumping.

    I never thought the plane had any nasty stall characteristics. But, it’s folks like this guy who created the “need” for the Barron wing.

    This guy never gave that plane a chance. It’s almost unbelievable nobody died.

    MTV
    Likes TurboBeaver, Troy Hamon liked this post

  30. #2910
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK.
    Posts
    3,856
    Post Thanks / Like
    https://ntrs.nasa.gov/api/citations/...9740013521.pdf

    If interested in the Beaver's NACA 64A416-4416 airfoil have a read. Note the "brisk" loss of lift during the stall with various flap extensions vs retracted.

    Edit: From the DHC-2's Op Manual p. 42:

    "The stall is gentle at all normal conditions of load and flap and may be anticipated by a slight vibration, which increases as the flap is lowered. The aircraft will pitch if no yaw is present. If yaw is permitted, the aircraft has a tendency to roll. Prompt corrective action must be initiated to prevent a roll from developing."

    Here's another report from a similar float accident - full power created yaw (P-factor?) and resulting roll into the yaw (torque roll or fuselage blanking part of the inboard wing's lift?) is the common factor with low airspeed wind over the rudder and wing controls :

    "During the attempted overshoot, the rapid application of full power caused the aircraft to yaw to the left, and a left roll quickly developed. This movement, in combination with a high angle of attack and low airspeed, likely caused the aircraft to stall.

    Gary
    Last edited by BC12D-4-85; 07-30-2022 at 11:11 PM.
    Thanks vj88 thanked for this post

  31. #2911
    mvivion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Bozeman,MT
    Posts
    12,266
    Post Thanks / Like
    I was checked out in the Beaver by a very experienced deHavilland pilot. We did lots of stalls, plus executing quite steep turns. His mantra was: “Never try to turn a Beaver close to the ground without a good bit of flap deployed.” His point was a lot of pilots killed themselves in Beavers going into a pass and not configuring the plane prior to a turn. Takes some monkey motion to lower flaps: select flaps down, then start pumping.

    I never thought the plane had any nasty stall characteristics. But, it’s folks like this guy who created the “need” for the Barron wing.

    This guy never gave that plane a chance. It’s almost unbelievable nobody died.

    MTV

  32. #2912
    stewartb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Wolf Lake, AK
    Posts
    7,587
    Post Thanks / Like
    Watch closely. Nose high, full R ailerons, and a late yaw that appears he added right rudder.

  33. #2913
    aktango58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    18AA
    Posts
    9,852
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by S2D View Post
    Downwind turn to boot !!!!!
    If a young pilot, I wonder if his GPS had groundspeed prominently displayed?

    Not much is said about ground obstructions, but this is a fine example that I believe had a big impact on the final results.

    A heavy plane like a loaded Beaver does not accelerate quickly, it has about 15% less horsepower to weight ratio than a 2000 pound 150 cub. When taking off this beaver had a quartering headwind and turned to give himself a slight downwind...

    While low and on the water the winds were obstructed by buildings at TS international and even more from hangars surrounding the lake. Those obstructions block the airflow low, but also push the airflow up- at some point in a climb there will be a windshear where the plane enters the higher velocity undisturbed air above the obstructions. If you are low and slow, facing downwind a all, that shear can be almighty scary; like climbing above the trees and finding a slight tailwind as you try to out climb the trees at the end.

    Amongst the other things going on, it appears the climb stopped just above the buildings where that slight wind shear would be.

    I don't get a good enough quality of video to see control surfaces, but the plane got slow, which is not a good look for a loaded beaver.

    MTV: flap selector should be set to 'down' unless raising flaps, Correct? That is one of the teachings of all the old timers I flew with. But agree that pilots need to think ahead when flying these beasts. The good thing is that unless the windscreen is full of ground, it is close to flap speed, so as soon as you roll into a turn and give a touch of pressure your speed is low enough to start pumping flaps, but you better be pumping quick because that 110 MPH stall is coming.
    I don't know where you've been me lad, but I see you won first Prize!
    Likes Coondog liked this post

  34. #2914

    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    King Salmon, AK
    Posts
    140
    Post Thanks / Like
    I have taken off from Lake Hood in similar conditions with a similar load, though boxes of tools were substituted for some of the passengers. I am amazed in watching that video at how early he was off the water. The wind didn't look to be strong enough to be airborne that early, let alone as high up as he got. But without the actual numbers, just puzzling it out loud based on what little I know. What I see in that video doesn't make sense at all.
    Thanks 85Mike, Bowie thanked for this post

  35. #2915

    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska Carefree, AZ
    Posts
    368
    Post Thanks / Like
    Very lucky to have hit the water, ground and other aircraft so close. Would have been fireball on land a few feet away.
    Classic too slow, sinking, then downwind turn.
    Likes BC12D-4-85 liked this post

  36. #2916
    aktango58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    18AA
    Posts
    9,852
    Post Thanks / Like
    [QUOTE=Troy Hamon;829906]I have taken off from Lake Hood in similar conditions with a similar load, though boxes of tools were substituted for some of the passengers. I am amazed in watching that video at how early he was off the water. The wind didn't look to be strong enough to be airborne that early, let alone as high up as he got. But without the actual numbers, just puzzling it out loud based on what little I know. What I see in that video doesn't make sense at all.[/QUOTE
    Small children, small adults, day trip.

    Tourists that were healthy and undersized- it happens once a year.
    I don't know where you've been me lad, but I see you won first Prize!

  37. #2917
    stewartb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Wolf Lake, AK
    Posts
    7,587
    Post Thanks / Like
    Another oops. This one a 747 freighter. Under tow, the tow connection broke, the plane was headed to run of off the ramp and down the slope next to the ramp until a truck took one for the team and blocked the nose gear.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	0B2EB63B-3E00-4411-940E-118FC9B873A9.jpeg 
Views:	123 
Size:	141.6 KB 
ID:	61952   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DFB649CE-FD31-42C9-9EBB-E47D8B1A47F6.jpeg 
Views:	114 
Size:	119.2 KB 
ID:	61953  
    Likes skukum12 liked this post

  38. #2918
    skywagon8a's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    SE Mass
    Posts
    12,382
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by stewartb View Post
    Another oops. This one a 747 freighter. Under tow, the tow connection broke, the plane was headed to run of off the ramp and down the slope next to the ramp until a truck took one for the team and blocked the nose gear.
    That's a NO NO. There is always supposed to be a person in the cockpit to step on the brakes when one of these is under tow. Someone is going to be in trouble for this.
    N1PA
    Likes wireweinie, eviens liked this post

  39. #2919
    frequent_flyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2021
    Location
    Arizona, USA
    Posts
    962
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by skywagon8a View Post
    That's a NO NO. There is always supposed to be a person in the cockpit to step on the brakes when one of these is under tow. Someone is going to be in trouble for this.
    It would not be the first time there WAS someone in the cockpit but aircraft systems were configured incorrectly resulting in no brake pressure. Doesn't need a big airplane to get this wrong, Can be done in CubCrafters aircraft too (but not for quite the same reasons)

  40. #2920
    wireweinie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    4,646
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by frequent_flyer View Post
    It would not be the first time there WAS someone in the cockpit but aircraft systems were configured incorrectly resulting in no brake pressure. Doesn't need a big airplane to get this wrong, Can be done in CubCrafters aircraft too (but not for quite the same reasons)
    Just sniff the air in that cockpit. You'll find out if someone was riding dead brakes or not.

    Web
    Life's tough . . . wear a cup.

Similar Threads

  1. oops
    By 907cub in forum Cafe Supercub
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 05-04-2012, 09:18 AM
  2. Oops
    By cubdriver2 in forum Ski Flying Forum
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 03-04-2012, 07:25 PM
  3. big oops!
    By Randy in forum Cafe Supercub
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 03-14-2007, 09:35 AM
  4. Darn temperture dropped
    By Alex Clark in forum Cafe Supercub
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 11-02-2004, 03:32 AM

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •