Page 76 of 83 FirstFirst ... 26667475767778 ... LastLast
Results 3,001 to 3,040 of 3320

Thread: Oops, darn it...

  1. #3001
    stewartb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Wolf Lake, AK
    Posts
    7,777
    Post Thanks / Like
    The accident happened just a few hundred yards from Life Med, a fully equipped helicopter and ambulance medevac service, so a paramedic was on-scene very quickly. The pilot apparently got himself out and was found on the hangar floor. He had severe facial injuries and in Anchorage now for more diagnostic imaging and surgery to address brain injuries.

    The witnesses say the engine was intermittent. Catch and quit. We all need to mentally rehearse our post-takeoff options. And actions.
    Last edited by stewartb; 08-30-2022 at 07:04 AM.
    Likes Airguide, AZinAK, aktango58 liked this post

  2. #3002
    stewartb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Wolf Lake, AK
    Posts
    7,777
    Post Thanks / Like
    He just passed away. Godspeed.

  3. #3003

    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    190
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by stewartb View Post
    He just passed away. Godspeed.
    Damn. I'm really sorry to hear that.

  4. #3004

    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Juneau, AK
    Posts
    58
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by stewartb View Post
    He just passed away. Godspeed.
    Local Juneau article states Wolf Lake individual is in stable condition. Were you referencing someone else who was not so fortunate?

    https://www.kinyradio.com/news/news-...ear-wolf-lake/
    Thanks mydoghasa170 thanked for this post

  5. #3005
    stewartb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Wolf Lake, AK
    Posts
    7,777
    Post Thanks / Like
    I said too much already. More info will be available later.

  6. #3006
    stewartb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Wolf Lake, AK
    Posts
    7,777
    Post Thanks / Like
    His wife has scheduled a Celebration of Life this Sunday here at Wolf Lake from 1:00 to 4:00 if any of you knew Brad.

  7. #3007
    cubdriver2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    upstate NY
    Posts
    11,396
    Post Thanks / Like
    Sad deal, hope the family finds peace

    Glenn
    "Optimism is going after Moby Dick in a rowboat and taking the tartar sauce with you!"
    Thanks stewartb thanked for this post

  8. #3008

    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Juneau, AK
    Posts
    58
    Post Thanks / Like
    Sorry for the communities loss. My condolences

  9. #3009
    tedwaltman1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Delta, CO
    Posts
    640
    Post Thanks / Like
    Just heard a Mayday call on 122.9. I was about 24 miles N of Sun Valley Idaho amongst peaks so mtns might have played a factor in the faint reception.

    Pilot said he was over Jack’s Peak (?) then his signal cut out.

    I reported info to Sun Valley tower. They said they were “working their resources” to try to find others who might have heard the transmission.

    Sure got my attention. Raises the hair on my neck.

    If anyone gets more info please post or PM me.

  10. #3010
    sjohnson's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Boise, ID
    Posts
    830
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by tedwaltman1 View Post
    Just heard a Mayday call on 122.9. I was about 24 miles N of Sun Valley Idaho amongst peaks so mtns might have played a factor in the faint reception.
    Pilot said he was over Jack’s Peak (?) then his signal cut out.
    ...
    Most likely calling over Jackson Peak (there's a fire lookout there), a few miles southwest of Warm Springs airstrip. Hope he made it.
    There are three simple rules for making consistently smooth landings. Unfortunately no one knows what they are.
    Likes courierguy liked this post

  11. #3011
    courierguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Inkom, Idaho
    Posts
    2,188
    Post Thanks / Like
    Can't fault the weather, hot now but 61 this AM where I flew in SE Idaho. Yeah that is spooky.
    Likes Poor Joe liked this post

  12. #3012
    tedwaltman1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Delta, CO
    Posts
    640
    Post Thanks / Like
    I heard Center asking another pilot to call w the additional info that pilot had. Kind of sounded like the other pilot was a lot closer and/or saw the accident.

  13. #3013

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    520
    Post Thanks / Like
    Heard a red and white cub went down over in the Pt McKenzie area last night about 7:30, two souls on board were transported to a Anch hospital. I don't know the severity but prayers non the less they are OK.

  14. #3014
    stewartb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Wolf Lake, AK
    Posts
    7,777
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by StalledOut View Post
    Heard a red and white cub went down over in the Pt McKenzie area last night about 7:30, two souls on board were transported to a Anch hospital. I don't know the severity but prayers non the less they are OK.
    A little good news on a Thursday.

    https://www.adn.com/alaska-news/avia...officials-say/
    Last edited by stewartb; 09-01-2022 at 02:43 PM.
    Thanks supercrow thanked for this post
    Likes Steve Pierce, 40m, jrussl, Richgj3 liked this post

  15. #3015

    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Silverdale, WA
    Posts
    68
    Post Thanks / Like

    DHC-3 Fatalities Off Whidbey

    A DHC-3 crashed off of Whidbey Island, WA last Sunday. Eye witness reported that “the aircraft dropped suddenly at a fair amount of speed and hit the water.” Pilot plus 9 PAX onboard with no survivors. Very little debris recovered so far and one body - probably in fairly deep water. I’m told there was a safety directive issued last year on this aircraft type but don’t know if it had any bearing on this kind of accident.

    I’m interested in thoughts from those with experience in the DHC-3.

    Thoughts and prayers for the lives lost and their loved ones!

    https://www.kitsapsun.com/story/news...er/8000357001/

    https://www.asias.faa.gov/apex/f?p=1...22,DEHAVILLAND




    Likes gdafoe liked this post

  16. #3016
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK.
    Posts
    4,025
    Post Thanks / Like
    Elevator trim problems?

    Gary

  17. #3017

    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    953
    Post Thanks / Like
    Dan gryder - of you tube fame, has a pretty compelling opinion on the this incident
    Thanks h2oavi8r thanked for this post

  18. #3018
    scout88305's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Northern Minnesota
    Posts
    1,842
    Post Thanks / Like
    Video put up quick. Sounds like it will be removed shortly. Quite sad. My question to those that fly these. When a turbine is hung on a airframe designed for radial engines and slower speeds, what does that do to fatigue?





    “We sleep safely in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm.”
    Thanks skywagon8a thanked for this post
    Likes Paul Heinrich liked this post

  19. #3019
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK.
    Posts
    4,025
    Post Thanks / Like
    Here's another example of inflight elevator trim failure for a turbine equipped DHC-3. Note their analysis of prior events during which Vne may have been exceeded.

    https://data.ntsb.gov/Docket/?NTSBNumber=ANC15LA037

    Find more here?: https://www.ntsb.gov/Pages/search.aspx#k=DHC-3

    Gary

  20. #3020
    stewartb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Wolf Lake, AK
    Posts
    7,777
    Post Thanks / Like
    I hope the airplane is recovered for the families and the investigation. Three possibly related events in the previous 25 years may warrant a closer look but it isn’t a smoking gun.
    Likes hotrod180 liked this post

  21. #3021
    skywagon8a's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    SE Mass
    Posts
    12,536
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by scout88305 View Post
    Video put up quick. Sounds like it will be removed shortly. Quite sad. My question to those that fly these. When a turbine is hung on a airframe designed for radial engines and slower speeds, what does that do to fatigue?




    Thank you for this, he makes a lot of sense and seems to have a handle on a likely probable cause. I have heard when an airplane is converted from a recip to a turbine the natural resonant frequency does change. This means that a part which works well for decades suddenly becomes dangerous. A few years ago the FAA mandated changing from a single to a dual actuation in certain trim systems. Perhaps we'll never know the true failure of this airplane? It is possible that a failure of some portion of the pitch trim could have allowed the trim tab to flutter. I can tell you from personal experience that can happen instantaneously without warning. When a trim tab flutters, everything it is attached to also moves following the tab's action. A failed tab could cause the entire tail to separate from the airplane. In my case I was able to keep the airplane under control to the landing, with difficulty.

    I do know if I had a turbine Otter, that tail would now be undergoing an extensive inspection. Doesn't Dave Calkins fly one of these?
    N1PA
    Likes 180Marty, Rob liked this post

  22. #3022
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK.
    Posts
    4,025
    Post Thanks / Like
    Read this and appreciate the dangers involved with trim flutter: https://data.ntsb.gov/Docket/?NTSBNumber=ANC05LA046

    While for a DHC-2 read the attached Service Bulletin for issues with the DHC-3 elevator servo tabs.

    Gary
    Likes JeffP liked this post

  23. #3023
    Rob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    AZ06
    Posts
    831
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by scout88305 View Post
    My question to those that fly these. When a turbine is hung on a airframe designed for radial engines and slower speeds, what does that do to fatigue?
    I do not fly those, but I do have a pair of S2R's that started as R1340's and now sport the same engine and prop combination as the plane in this accident as well as the one that went down in Yakutat.

    The engine (M601E-11A) and prop (which was a 108" Avia not a Hartzel... sorry Dan) are a great combination, but your question has a lot of merit. S2R's have a spar life, and various spar related AD's, but to your point, that spar life has a series of formulae and that life changes from a 'life long' recip, to a 'turbine converted from recip', and is also different than a 'born' turbine. I have no idea what that means for the tail, and personally would lean towards a corrosion or fatigue failure, but like Pete, if I owned a turbine single otter, I'd be knee deep in the tail. I feel almost fortunate that my converted airplanes both sport fabric tails that require almost non stop attention.... Ignorance is only bliss until something bad happens of it.

    Take care, Rob
    Thanks JeffP thanked for this post

  24. #3024
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK.
    Posts
    4,025
    Post Thanks / Like
    If potential flutter in DHC-2 or -3's is a known issue, then why isn't it a constant monitoring task? Maybe it is - don't know. Maybe the turbines blow more airflow over the tail or increased airspeed make it more critical? Airspeed indication versus true airspeed may not be the same especially if demonstrated Vne is approached.

    Gary

  25. #3025
    skywagon8a's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    SE Mass
    Posts
    12,536
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by BC12D-4-85 View Post
    If potential flutter in DHC-2 or -3's is a known issue, then why isn't it a constant monitoring task? Maybe it is - don't know. Maybe the turbines blow more airflow over the tail or increased airspeed make it more critical? Airspeed indication versus true airspeed may not be the same especially if demonstrated Vne is approached.

    Gary
    Potential flutter of the type we are talking about is possible on any airplane which has a trim tab on the elevator(s). For any number of reasons. The change from recip to turbine isn't necessarily the speed of the airplane, more likely the speed of rotation of the engine. The recip in this case is normally rotating in the 2000 rpm range with a singular periodic piston impulse. The turbine rotates in the 10,000 +/- range with a steady high frequency "buzz". These engine produced vibrations travel throughout the airframe, coming out at the wing tips and tail. Those components which were designed to function without issue with the recip, sometimes can not safely function without failure at the higher frequency. This is partially why some components have a lifetime time or cycle limitation for inspection or removal. The tail being at the opposite end of the fuselage from the engine is the most susceptible to these forces.
    N1PA
    Likes Richgj3, tedwaltman1, mixer, Willie liked this post

  26. #3026
    CenterHillAg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Texas Coast
    Posts
    157
    Post Thanks / Like
    With the exception of the last 10 years or so of production, all Ag Cat’s started life as a radial and were converted to turbine. I’ve worked around a few that are 15k+ hrs of turbine time and don’t show any abnormal wear from the turbine, mine has 3k hrs with a turbine after 8k hrs of a radial and is fine. My mechanic says the only issue he’s seen turbine related is a twisted frame from over-torquing on takeoff. However, an Ag Cat is quite possibly the most overbuilt and rugged ag plane built, they’re incredibly easy to inspect and get in front of repairs before something breaks from fatigue. I’ve never been around an Otter or Beaver during annual so I don’t know how hard a turbine is on the airframe, but a Thrush is the only other ag plane that comes close to the ruggedness of a Cat.

  27. #3027
    skywagon8a's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    SE Mass
    Posts
    12,536
    Post Thanks / Like
    Other than both the Trush and the Cat having tubular fuselages vs the Beaver and Otter's sheet aluminum they all have trim tabs on the elevators. One little failure which allows the tab to free float can result in (possibly instantaneous) disaster.
    N1PA
    Likes mixer liked this post

  28. #3028

    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Talkeetna Alaska
    Posts
    314
    Post Thanks / Like
    Cruise RPM for PT6 Otter is 17-1900 and Garrett is high 1500's. Walter is similar to the PT6. Turbines will turn in the 30-40.000's. IAS is limited to speeds similar to piston models. There is a lot of maintenance focus on the flight control systems and wing strut assemblies.
    Thanks Rob thanked for this post

  29. #3029
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK.
    Posts
    4,025
    Post Thanks / Like
    I wonder if turbine powered DHC-3's deflect or at least deploy the elevator trim more or more frequently during normal ops?

    Gary
    Thanks mixer thanked for this post

  30. #3030

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    AK
    Posts
    351
    Post Thanks / Like
    Otter pitch trim is a trimmable stabilizer hinged at the front with a jack screw in the back. A servo tab is on the right elevator and and extra-large chord trim tab on the left elevator is linked to the flaps, which adds nose down trim when flaps are deployed. This system is not original, but was installed via a service bulletin/kit not long after they were built. There is currently an AD requiring 100hr inspections of the tab slop, due to previous issues such as noted above. The flap trim tab especially has a lot of rod ends and connections that make up the linkage. Part of the pt-6 conversion is adding a redundant second pushrod on the servo tab on the right side, but it’s not required on the Garret- always made me think it’d be a good idea...
    Thanks stewartb, BC12D-4-85 thanked for this post

  31. #3031

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Illinois & Wisconsin
    Posts
    896
    Post Thanks / Like
    It’s remarkable that the failure of such a relatively small piece of metal can exert such enormous force on the controls that very strong men and women can’t overcome its effect. What makes this story truly tragic is that no one has bothered to come up with a safe, inexpensive, and reliable permanent fix after so many years witnessing such heartbreaking events.
    GA, Dehavilland, Harbor Air, Kenmore, etc. all risk losing everything if one of theirs breaks. Crossing your fingers or knock wood doesn’t seem to cut it.
    Likes BC12D-4-85 liked this post

  32. #3032
    algonquin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Seldovia,Ak
    Posts
    1,165
    Post Thanks / Like
    This type of control problem isn’t all that uncommon, the Twin Bee has a elevator tab that will crash the plane if the control rod comes off.

  33. #3033

    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Fairvew East (Crane Road Airstrip),Wasilla, AK
    Posts
    79
    Post Thanks / Like
    This last bit of discussion about the catastrophic loss of a control surface on the turbine float plane made me try to think about what I might do if some similar disaster occurred on my PA-11. Let's say an aileron/rudder/elevator cable breaks or comes disconnected, or a pulley/wheel falls loose, or a pivot pin falls out, or etc. Hmmm. My poor little brain was immediately tied in knots. With the elevators I did have some side thoughts to engage as regards the trim cables; but all in all, I could not get far in trying to think of alternatives for quickly developing alternative methods of control sufficient to execute a survivable crash/landing. I think I remember a story of someone having some failure of control for elevators but managed to survive with a mix of trim and throttle control. A full on discussion of such events here would occupy the next two years! But it occurs to me to wonder if anyone has ever done a full on study of these possibilities for a simple cub-styled plane and written a book about it. Anyone heard of such?

  34. #3034
    skywagon8a's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    SE Mass
    Posts
    12,536
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Heinrich View Post
    It’s remarkable that the failure of such a relatively small piece of metal can exert such enormous force on the controls that very strong men and women can’t overcome its effect.
    Quote Originally Posted by algonquin View Post
    This type of control problem isn’t all that uncommon, the Twin Bee has a elevator tab that COULD crash the plane if the control rod comes off.
    I changed your will to could. It has never reached my ears that a Twin Bee did crash due to this issue. Most, if not all of them which are gone are due to pilot errors or mishandling an engine failure (again, pilot error).

    It did almost happen when the push rod (Piper PA-23 part) broke. It took two of us holding the controls with all our might in order to attempt to reduce the flutter. It's hard to say at this point in time whether we had much effect. The flutter did not stop until the wheels rolled on the ground. The only thing I can be certain of is, slowing the airplane had the most effect at reducing the flutter forces.

    This airplane has a long balance arm with a lead weight on it extending forward of the elevator control horn. Due to a ground flutter analysis test the weight of the lead was increased. The arm was then tested for the increased G loads and found to meet the FAA requirements of +/- 14 g in one direction and +/- 28 g in the other. ( I forget the actual G loads, But they are huge). When we got the airplane back to the hangar we found this arm twisted like a pretzel and rubbing on one of the elevator cables. It came that close to breaking the elevator cable.

    Paul, an earlier incident with this same trim tab happened when it set up a high frequency "buzz" While doing a high speed dive test (not yet at the objective speed). This "buzz" transmitted into the push rod which was controlling it. The oscillations of the push rod exceeded the bending strength of the rod while under compression causing it to buckle. During this process the elevator was destroyed. This particular issue was solved by placing the bellcrank on the opposite side of the tab and changing the winding of the trim cable so that the rod "pulled" in this trim condition rather than "pushing".

    I don't doubt for a minute that one of the components which ak49flyer described could have failed causing this Otter to crash. Most pilots and mechanics do not realize how critical these trim tab components are. Take this as a heads up from someone who has been there more than once ..... and survived.

    I know of one other example in which this same thing happened (tab push rod separated) on short final to landing with a Fairchild FH-227 at PWM. The pilots had their hands full, but also were successful in landing.
    N1PA
    Thanks Richgj3, Farmboy, jrussl thanked for this post
    Likes BC12D-4-85 liked this post

  35. #3035
    Richgj3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    LI,NY
    Posts
    1,324
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by salex View Post
    This last bit of discussion about the catastrophic loss of a control surface on the turbine float plane made me try to think about what I might do if some similar disaster occurred on my PA-11. Let's say an aileron/rudder/elevator cable breaks or comes disconnected, or a pulley/wheel falls loose, or a pivot pin falls out, or etc. Hmmm. My poor little brain was immediately tied in knots. With the elevators I did have some side thoughts to engage as regards the trim cables; but all in all, I could not get far in trying to think of alternatives for quickly developing alternative methods of control sufficient to execute a survivable crash/landing. I think I remember a story of someone having some failure of control for elevators but managed to survive with a mix of trim and throttle control. A full on discussion of such events here would occupy the next two years! But it occurs to me to wonder if anyone has ever done a full on study of these possibilities for a simple cub-styled plane and written a book about it. Anyone heard of such?
    I am familiar with two such events in small Pipers. A PA11 lost up elevator cable and was landed safely by the instructor using trim and power. This happened many years ago at what is now Bayport Aerodrome. The instructor was Tom Murphy, the most natural pilot anybody around here ever met. I swear he was part bird. Maybe Jonathan Livingston Seagull.

    The second was not so good. A PA18 glider tow lost down elevator on take off with glider in tow. Pitched up, stalled and resulted in a fatality. Granted in the first case the pilot had more time to analyze the situation than the second pilot did.

    Rich
    Thanks Travelair3000 thanked for this post

  36. #3036
    frequent_flyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2021
    Location
    Arizona, USA
    Posts
    1,048
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Richgj3 View Post
    The second was not so good. A PA18 glider tow lost down elevator on take off with glider in tow. Pitched up, stalled and resulted in a fatality. Granted in the first case the pilot had more time to analyze the situation than the second pilot did.
    I have towed with several different aircraft. I alway set trim after landing so I was in trim for the next tow. Did the accident report indicate how far out of trim this tug was?

  37. #3037
    wireweinie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    4,781
    Post Thanks / Like
    I've been reading these comments about Otters and their control systems and I would like to make an observational comment.

    Most of the comments are negative, and suggest that 'someone' needs to step in and stop these 'dangerous' systems from flying. As someone that has helped maintain Otters/Beavers for the last twenty or so years, I disagree strongly. As an A&P, the first time I worked on these aircraft, I asked questions. I was taking responsibility for the airworthiness of the aircraft, so I went and talked to 'old guys' that had flown or fixed them since they were new designs. ALL of them told me to pay extra attention to the tail and landing gear. And my experience has shown that they were right. One look at the main gear struts will tell you that a broken bolt or strut stands a high possibility of punching a hole in one of the fuel tanks. Tail wheels on a heavy aircraft like these take a special beating along with the structure where they are mounted. Putting an electrical tail wheel steering assembly in an Otter tail adds a complex item to harsh environment. Then come the warnings about insuring that the rudder, horizontal, and elevators are installed correctly AND maintained properly. For installation, this means using the correct hardware and installing it in the correct order. Maintaining these items means just that; do your maintenance! Perform your 100 hour inspections and do them correctly. Do any special inspections as required and comply with your ADs. I guess I'm trying to pass on the info given to me but I'm also trying to point out that the issues we've been discussing are largely avoidable through proper maintenance. I've had to replace those loose bolts in those tabs and rod ends. I've looked for those cracks. Do I think that any of these systems are especially dangerous? Absolutely not! Every aircraft ever flown has some special area that bears extra attention. And, in this case, it requires nothing more than good maintenance practices to keep it airworthy.

    We will never have a perfectly safe aircraft but we can use our heads and make them as safe as humanly possible.

    Web
    Life's tough . . . wear a cup.
    Thanks h2oavi8r, ak49flyer thanked for this post

  38. #3038
    Farmboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Glens Falls, NY & Middlebury, VT
    Posts
    2,970
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by wireweinie View Post
    ——- the first time I worked on these aircraft, I asked questions. I was taking responsibility for the airworthiness of the aircraft, so I went and talked to 'old guys' that had flown or fixed them since they were new designs. ——-

    Web
    This right here.

    Experience is the best teacher. Without it, listen to those with it.


    Transmitted from my FlightPhone on fingers…

  39. #3039
    12Geezer2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Eau Claire, WI
    Posts
    1,098
    Post Thanks / Like
    Seems I remember the hot rodded P-51 air racers have had trim issues also. Believe motorcycle man, Bob Hannah has a story, luckily he can tell. I recently looked over a nice 180 Super Cub glider tow plane that had horizontal tail failure--lucky was still on the runway ---glider released safely---inverted Cub ---substantial damage but very fortunate pilot. Empennage is VERY important on all aircraft. just an old geezers 2 cents

  40. #3040
    Richgj3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    LI,NY
    Posts
    1,324
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by frequent_flyer View Post
    I have towed with several different aircraft. I alway set trim after landing so I was in trim for the next tow. Did the accident report indicate how far out of trim this tug was?
    I don’t recall if that was mentioned. I will search later. This happened twenty years ago at least at KHWV Brookhaven NY. The Cub had just come back from a recover job. Bolt and nut missing (assumes the nut was ever there.)
    Thanks frequent_flyer thanked for this post

Similar Threads

  1. oops
    By 907cub in forum Cafe Supercub
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 05-04-2012, 09:18 AM
  2. Oops
    By cubdriver2 in forum Ski Flying Forum
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 03-04-2012, 07:25 PM
  3. big oops!
    By Randy in forum Cafe Supercub
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 03-14-2007, 09:35 AM
  4. Darn temperture dropped
    By Alex Clark in forum Cafe Supercub
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 11-02-2004, 03:32 AM

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •