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Thread: Building a Javron Cub

  1. #2241
    SJ's Avatar
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    Very nice, Bill! Nice hangar too! We missed going to Sandpoint last year.

    sj
    "Often Mistaken, but Never in Doubt"
    ------------------------------------------

  2. #2242
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    Many thanks Bill. I would have never thought of taking the tail completely off. Good suggestion, even though I’m never in the water 😄😄. Maybe every other year. Thank you also for the Summit Racing link. I previously got on the male end with 7447 ScotchBrite and did a couple hundred round and round “sands” with my fingers until it was once again smooth. Now I can buy a supply of conical seals!
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  3. #2243
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Eggs and "Elk Sausage" for breakfast. Thank you!!!.... Dan!
    Life is good
    Very Blessed. "It's not an obsession, it's a passion"
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  4. #2244
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Folks


    Been a busy spring so I have been remiss in posting. Hope this helps. The annual went well. It took about 160 hours and there are things that still did not get done. I did get the ADSB installed. Since I go through Canada and spend a fair amount of time up there I got the 1090 freq set up verses the 978UAT freq. Now it looks like Canada might even go to "diversity" so I might have to upgrade in the future.
    I am using a Trig T22 transponder that runs through the GRT EFIS display unit and a Safe-Fly WAAS enabled GPS module. That set up took several days to get installed and running. I had to call tech support to get a little help. I had serial port conflicts and could not figure it out. My issue was not in the manual so I was not going to ever get it without tech help. GRT was great as always. Seems to work like a charm now.

    Overall I am quite pleased with the way things are holding up. Nothing unusual to report except........

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    This is what a normal flared fitting looks like.


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    This used to look like the picture above. Note, no flare left. This fitting was leaking (gee what a surprise). If you over tighten a flare fitting this is what eventually happens. Vibration and time will flatten it out. It does not take much pressure to get a good seal. Don't over tighten things.


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    This is what a normal, used, clean, plug looks like (I run automotive plugs)


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    This plug has lead deposits called "clinkers". The arrow points to little balls of lead that accumulate over time and cause fouling. You can dig them out (carefully) with a dental pick.


    So.....this is how I rig my floats.....I'm sure I will be told that I'm doing it all wrong but here goes......


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    Get the floats on and the wires installed and at least firm enough to hold things in place. Without the wires the whole rig becomes a parallelogram and the airplane will list to one side and damage things. Now....run a string under the leading edge of the wing from one wingtip, over the top of the floats, to the other wingtip. I try to get it pretty much directly under the spar. Make sure the string is exactly parallel to the top of the floats. Don't let it touch the top of the floats because it will be hard to tell if it is being deflected. Measure REALLY carefully how high it sits above each float and make it EXACTLY the same from one float top to the other float top. You are dealing with a long lever arm, so to speak, so getting each distance above the float is critical. This establishes the angle of the floats from side to side. The fore/aft line is fixed by the rigging, sometimes referred to as the fish mouth angle.

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    Now you can measure from a common fixed point on each wing to the back of the respective float. By adjusting the wires you can move the floats left or right a little to get the floats to line up with the longitudinal axis of the fuselage. ie the floats are going the same direction as the fuselage. They should be pretty close to start with and you can't make say.....a 3" change..... but you can move it an inch or so....(at least on Wips) ....and you would like to get this within a 1/4 inch or less.


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    Next we will try to get the tops of the floats parallel to the lateral axis. ie they are lined up with the wing. Measure down from a common point on each wing, in this case where the spar connects to the last rib, to that string. Adjust the wires to get the same measurement. I shoot for 1/8" here. You will also have to check the longitudinal measurement (mentioned above) to make sure you don't get it out of whack while doing this one. By using the string you eliminate an un-level floor, or unequal tire pressure, etc.


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    Because of the threads being both left and right, and the fact that I am easily confused, I find it helpful to put a little tape with an arrow to tell me which way to turn to tighten while I am doing this.

    Once you have the rigging set in this manner you can tweak things by adjusting the water rudders a little to finalize and perfect your in- flight handling. Fly it......adjust the water rudders to negate turning tendencies....fly it again.....adjust....fly ....adjust etc. You will then have a clue.....depending on how much offset they are......to the fact that you left them down in flight. The airplane will fly different from the up and down positions.....if you are sensitive enough to pay attention and also if the air is smooth enough. Obviously you won't notice in turbulence. If you get it right you will be able to fly hands off for long stretches. Note:......The airplane needs to fly straight before you put floats on. Get that rigging first. You must get it right, straight, rigged on wheels BEFORE you add the floats.


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    Bottom line.....it was a good annual and I am back in Alaska for the summer.....over Prince William Sound.


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    At the Big Shaheen Cabin......



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    No place else......going to be a great summer.....


    Build that dream airplane.......you won't regret it.

    Hope this helps

    Bill
    Last edited by Bill Rusk; 05-11-2021 at 11:24 PM.
    Very Blessed. "It's not an obsession, it's a passion"

  5. #2245

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    You are the most fastidious person I have ever known. Your attention to detail and pursuit of precision is remarkable. I’ll bet no one at Southwest ever worried when they gave you the keys to the big iron.

    Your fabulous scenic photos look like they were taken by a professional with expensive equipment. Thanks for posting....everything!!!
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  6. #2246
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Rusk View Post
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    Because of the threads being both left and right, and the fact that I am easily confused, I find it helpful to put a little tape with an arrow to tell me which way to turn to tighten while I am doing this.
    Bill,
    It is easy to confuse this step. I place the right hand threads on the right side of the plane/floats and the left hand threads on the left. This keeps me from being confused with no need to write notes each time.
    N1PA
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  7. #2247
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Excellent idea. I will incorporate that in the future. Thank you


    Thank you for the kind words Paul. I have been very blessed


    Bill
    Very Blessed. "It's not an obsession, it's a passion"

  8. #2248
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    When we take floats off of a rigged plane we only loosen the wires on one side 5 to 8 turns and mark it. Makes it easy to reinstall in the spring, just tighten those wires back up the same number of turns

    Glenn
    "Optimism is going after Moby Dick in a rowboat and taking the tartar sauce with you!"
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  9. #2249
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    Yeah, but he has a 5 gallon pail of marbles!


    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Heinrich View Post
    You are the most fastidious person I have ever known. Your attention to detail and pursuit of precision is remarkable. I’ll bet no one at Southwest ever worried when they gave you the keys to the big iron.

    Your fabulous scenic photos look like they were taken by a professional with expensive equipment. Thanks for posting....everything!!!
    "Put out my hand and touched the face of God!"
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  10. #2250

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    Does anyone paint the aluminum spars and ribs?

  11. #2251
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyinwild View Post
    Does anyone paint the aluminum spars and ribs?
    It depends on the atmospheric conditions where you live. Lot's of salty seashore fog ... definitely. Keep it away from the seashore in a dry environment ...... optional.
    N1PA

  12. #2252
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    Quote Originally Posted by skywagon8a View Post
    It depends on the atmospheric conditions where you live. Lot's of salty seashore fog ... definitely. Keep it away from the seashore in a dry environment ...... optional.
    For structure enclosed inside the wing, what's your opinion of etch/alodyne alone vs painted?

    Web
    Life's tough . . . wear a cup.

  13. #2253
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Most Cubs spent a lot of their life tied down outside. Corrosion in the wings, though it does occur, has not been a significant problem. Is your aircraft going to be tied down outside in a corrosive environment (like the Gulf Coast), and do you expect to be alive in 50 years? For most of us the answers are “no” so I fall back on the keep it simple, light, and build for 90% rules.
    Most of the experimental Cubs are always hangared and corrosion is just not going to be an issue in our lifetimes. If you live in the Bahamas and intend to fly it on floats in salt water all the time……well…..that changes EVERYTHING.


    just my opinion

    Bill
    Very Blessed. "It's not an obsession, it's a passion"
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  14. #2254
    skywagon8a's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wireweinie View Post
    For structure enclosed inside the wing, what's your opinion of etch/alodyne alone vs painted?

    Web
    Not my opinion but from my personal observation. Originally the Colonial Skimmer and Lake amphibians were alodined and zinc chromate primed with reasonably good corrosion resistance success. Along about the early to middle 60s they decided to just alodyne and skip the chromate primer. The engineering specs for alodyne suggested that alodyne alone was sufficient. I saw the inside of some wings of an alodyne only Lake which was only one year old, yet had been based in the very corrosive atmosphere of Teterboro New Jersey. These wings inside were covered with surface corrosion. Once this was brought to the attention of Aerofab (Lake manufacturer) they began the zinc chromate on top of alodyne process again.

    Just etch/alodyne alone isn't as corrosion proof as the tests indicate.
    N1PA
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  15. #2255
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    I have etched, alodined and epoxy primed the spars and ribs. Piper did the same from at least the early to mid 70s on.
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
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  16. #2256
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    The flared AN fitting loosing it shape and going back to straight again does not make sense to me. I have seen over tighten flares and they just get bigger and thinner. The design of the ferrel should keep it from straightening out. I am not saying that tighter is better, but I don't think you would end up with the result shown if flared properly in the beginning.

    It would be pretty easy to prove the premise so I will try it when I get a chance and post the results. Flare end of sample and then start to tighten more. Then taking it apart maybe every 1/4 turn until it fails and take a picture each time.

    The oil return tubes on a Lycoming usually get reused and I have seen first hand over time how that flare becomes larger so I am curious to see what happens when a guy just keeps going to failure.
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  17. #2257
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Thank you Greg. It didn’t make sense to me but I just couldn’t figure out anything else. I know darn well when I put that together it was a normal flare, so either I’m doing something wrong, or something weird is happening. So if anybody can shed more light on it I’m certainly willing to learn.

    Bill
    Very Blessed. "It's not an obsession, it's a passion"

  18. #2258

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    Hi Bill,
    I am just getting started on a Javron wide super cub. I am enjoying all the posts and opinions this thread has generated. Did you put all of the weight information in a spreadsheet? Also did you make a parts list of your choices?

  19. #2259
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Flyinwild

    I did not put everything in a spreadsheet. Interesting idea I may incorporate in my next build and thread.

    Here is a link in my thread to a "shopping list" that might help https://www.supercub.org/forum/showt...l=1#post627604

    Congrats on your build. Best of luck

    Happy to help if I can

    Bill
    Very Blessed. "It's not an obsession, it's a passion"
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  20. #2260
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Folks

    I guess it has been a while since I posted. I spent the summer in Alaska, on floats, again this year. But due to "other" flying I only put about 150 hours on the cub. I am currently at about 1250 hours total time and everything continues to work well. Engine seems to be running well with no issues. Emags are great, Garmin 796 and radio work great, Grand Rapid avionics continue to perform perfectly. Really.... the only issues this year were a broken wire on a PTT, and a broken Hydraulic brake line. Still love this Cub and I'm looking forward to a little ski time this winter, and then heading back North in early May 2022. Here are a couple of photos from this summer........


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    I went North on the first of May and went to the Trade Show. Thanks to Litecub and Randy Appling for hosting me. This is my Cub in front of the Lake Louise Lodge east of Anchorage near Gulkana


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    I spent a little time (not nearly enough) flying this Beaver this summer



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    Spent time flying this 206 in the Wrangell-St. Elias area. We ran the mail to McCarthy, Dan Creek, and May Creek, and flew other Part 135 operations.



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    Yours truly trying desperately to learn to be a better pilot. Hauling a load in the 206



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    Got to spend a little time with friend Rick on the Copper river.



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    Then back to my "real" job for a few days, then back to Alaska. Back and forth all summer. Quite a change from Cubs and 206's, to Boeing 737's. This fall I checked out on ETOPS and I've made a few runs to Hawaii now.



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    End of the summer, Jay DeRosier of Javron came up to Alaska and we flew my Cub back down the coast and home to Sandpoint. This is over the Bagley ice field which is the southern part of Wrangell-St. Elias National Park.



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    As soon as we got back home we swapped floats to wheels and went into the Idaho Backcountry for a few days. This is Sept 20th or so and you can see the frost. Cold at night.



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    We enjoyed great weather and got to see a lot of the "playground" around the Johnson Creek area. This is Dewey Moore where we stopped in to visit some Elk hunters.


    To those of you building...... I know it can be frustrating sometimes, and you wonder what the heck you were thinking when you decided to build an airplane......
    but hang in there.......it is worth it. This is what you have to look forward to.

    Hope this helps (motivate)

    Bill
    Very Blessed. "It's not an obsession, it's a passion"
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  21. #2261

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    Bill is the yellow cub with your buddy Rick 70A by chance?

  22. #2262
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    PA-20/22

    Yes. Great guy!!

    Bill
    Very Blessed. "It's not an obsession, it's a passion"

  23. #2263

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    Thank you Bill!

  24. #2264

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    Quote Originally Posted by PA-22/20-160 View Post
    Bill is the yellow cub with your buddy Rick 70A by chance?
    Is that one you rebuilt? Paint scheme looks right up your alley.

  25. #2265

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    Yes that was my very 1st cub

  26. #2266

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    Here is a photo of a lane with your paint d


    Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org

  27. #2267
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Rusk View Post
    Wip 2100A Front Assembly RebuildAttachment 47025REALLY IMPORTANT!!!This bolt head with a grease zerk has a roll pin in it. When you take the nut off the other side DO NOT allow this side to rotate or you will shear the roll pin off and could create a lot of work for yourself.Attachment 47026The other side of this axle has a pretty standard nylon insert nut....3/4" wrench. Remember to lock the other side so it does not rotate when you take this nut off.Attachment 47027This is the roll pin. It is there to keep the axle from rotating so the bearings do the work. Note the washer has a cut out for the roll pin so don't loose this washer.Attachment 47028This is the hole in the axle head that the roll pin goes into. Attachment 47029Next we will take off the front gear assembly. These four bolts. Be sure to keep the bolts and washers in order. They are not all the same and it is a tight fit back there when the gear retracts. If you get them out of place it is going to crunch something when you retract the gear.Attachment 47030The two bolts on the bottom (closest to the wheel) are longer than the top. As the gear retracts the geometry is such that this provides clearance. For whatever reason these bolts are not listed in the parts manual so be careful here.Attachment 47032Be sure to check the bulkheads that the hydraulic ram goes through for cracks. If you get the travel out of adjustment (too long) the gear will hit the stop before the ram hits the end of its travel and that will in turn put pressure on the bulkheads, causing them to flex and at some point crack. So...... check for cracks.Attachment 47033Another bulkhead, another place to look for cracks.Attachment 47031You will need to be able to move the front hydraulic ram. I used the stand-by hand pump and a couple of extra hoses to connect it. No big deal. A= Up B= down S= a reservoir of Hyd fluid.We will use the pump to retract the front gear (the main may move as well depending on where the fluid is) to place the ram arm in the right (accessible) location.Attachment 47034We want this threaded clevis right here so we can unscrew it. There is a lock nut, then you will actually be rotating the ram piston arm to take it off the clevis. This will allow us to get the trolly out the front. This takes patience to unscrew as you can only turn it about 1/8 of a turn per wrench setting. This is also where we adjust the length to avoid cracking the bulkheads. Attachment 47035This long bolt sets the side to side play and we need to remove it to get the trolly out. When you pull the bolt out don't let the trolly fall to the floor. You might damage it.Attachment 47036This is the trolly assembly. The black Delrin slides on the side are what we will be checking. Along with the usual clean, inspect, lubricate and reassemble.Attachment 47037This is what it looks like up in there once the trolly is out of the way. Check the back wall (bulkhead) for cracks. The side arrow shows the rail that the Delrin blocks slide in.The arrows on the front are scrapes from a former life where a mechanic (pilot, or someone) did not keep those 4 bolts that hold the gear leg on to the trolly in the right order. Or he did not use the right washers in the right places. I recommend you do one float at a time, then you can use the other float as an example if you get lost or can't remember how something should go back together. Assuming it was right to start with.Attachment 47038Those little Delrin blocks should slide easily in the tracks. Check each one. This is important. If they bind the hydraulics will have plenty of force/leverage to force it to move but this will then put a lot of stress on the bulkheads holding the ram and probably cause a crack. These blocks will swell over time, especially if you make hard landings or operate from rough runways. They are expensive to replace so I recommend you treat the nose gear with respect. You need to check these blocks and make sure the trolly moves freely every season. You can sand the sides of the blocks to make them slide in the rails. I used 220 paper on a flat surface, followed by 600, 1000, 1500 and finally 2000 grit. Then polishing compound and a dremel tool. You will probably be taking 15 to 20 thousand off. They might mike at .765 and they will need to be about .750Attachment 47039There are three axles in the trolly. Roll them on a flat (glass) surface and make sure they are not bent. Clean, inspect, lubricate and reassemble. Be careful with the snap rings. If one flies off it could be hard to find.Attachment 47040Trolly parts.More to follow. Be sure to follow the Wip manual but hopefully this will supplement things and make it easier.Hope this helps Bill

    Hey bill,
    thanks for the write up. I had the fun task of rebuilding the front end of a set of 2100’s. The old(shiny) actuators were leaking and are not rebuildable. They are threaded into the gear box, but there is no flat to grab. These ones were really stuck. Really stuck. I ended up taking the whole gear box out to get them apart. The new style is rebuildable, and there is a jam nut on the back to loosen and they should spin out. You shouldn’t have to take the gearbox out to remove. Thanks for the info on the pieces that slide in the gear box. These didn’t fit, they were very tight. Got them sanded and they work by hand with out the actuator hooked up nice and smooth. You couldn’t move them by hand prior to that.

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  28. #2268
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Tom

    Thanks for the post. Yeah there is a service bulletin to replace those older actuators with the rebuildable newer ones. They are pretty expensive so, I am kind of a replace only as needed kind of guy on that.I am actually going through my floats right now as well.


    Hope to see you up in Alaska, if not perhaps Greenville. I hope to be there this year


    Bill
    Very Blessed. "It's not an obsession, it's a passion"
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  29. #2269
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Rusk View Post
    Tom

    Thanks for the post. Yeah there is a service bulletin to replace those older actuators with the rebuildable newer ones. They are pretty expensive so, I am kind of a replace only as needed kind of guy on that.I am actually going through my floats right now as well.


    Hope to see you up in Alaska, if not perhaps Greenville. I hope to be there this year


    Bill
    The time estimate they gave was way off. sure is fun taking the actuator off one flat at a time isnt it ?

    Greenville for sure, plan on doing some flying the week before.
    Both sides of these floats had puddles under them. only 230 hrs sense 2003. I think the new ones were a touch under $2000 each

  30. #2270
    cubdriver2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RaisedByWolves View Post
    The time estimate they gave was way off. sure is fun taking the actuator off one flat at a time isnt it ?

    Greenville for sure, plan on doing some flying the week before.
    Make sure your lights are working

    Glenn
    "Optimism is going after Moby Dick in a rowboat and taking the tartar sauce with you!"
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  31. #2271
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Folks


    I have been going through my floats as well right now. What a pain. It is not a pleasant job to disassemble everything, clean, inspect, re-grease, etc. I actually had to go back and reread my own thread in order to remind myself of what to do and the sequence to do it in. The good news is it only took three days this time instead of four. But it sure bruises your arms, hands, and beats you up. It’s a pretty miserable job. At the same time, I will add, I really really like the Wip floats. They have been outstanding.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    This is the set up I use to move the hyd rams and exercise the gear when it is no longer on the airplane. I use the standby hydraulic pump, with two lines connected to that particular float, and a third line that goes into a homemade reservoir of hydraulic fluid. A word to the wise, be sure that hydraulic reservoir you create is securely anchored, so that it cannot be knocked, or tipped over.


    Lord willing I will leave about 1 May to go up to Alaska for a couple/three months. I do hope to get the airplane to Oshkosh this year and, as mentioned previously, try to make it to the Greenville fly-in.
    Last edited by Bill Rusk; 04-04-2022 at 10:38 AM.
    Very Blessed. "It's not an obsession, it's a passion"
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  32. #2272

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    Bill, Awesome work as usual..........on a tangent, do you have an aux 14v external power plug for doing whatever electrical checks in the cockpit? Denny
    If you get lost while flying, don't try hail a cop. Pick up the first railroad you find and hug it until you get somewhere.

  33. #2273
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Denny

    No I don't but that is a great idea and I will look into that. What do you use as a power source? I have struggled with this as the EarthX does not like to be run down as you know, and with all this "programable" avionics stuff you need to be able to sit in the cockpit and work on the systems. Ideas? Thoughts?

    Thanks

    Bill
    Very Blessed. "It's not an obsession, it's a passion"

  34. #2274
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    Bill

    EarthX has a pigtail to connect to an external power source such as a charger. If you limit current to around ten amps or less, this should work as a convenient 'power plug'. It could be installed directly on the battery as originally designed, or installed down stream of the master relay to allow external power to the bus while the ships battery remains off line. The power source should be a battery/batteries that match ships power (12 volt or 24 volt) and an inline fuse or breaker to protect the wiring. A battery is preferred, as an AC power source will be 'noisey'.

    Web
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  35. #2275
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    I put in a standard 2-prong charge port with my EarthX install. Built a small door to access just the charge port on the boot cowl.

    Installed an external power receptacle: https://www.aircraftspruce.com/catal...?clickkey=8443

    Purchased a "Plug & Jump" accessory, though I've never used it: https://www.aircraftspruce.com/catal...?clickkey=7346

    Click image for larger version. 

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  36. #2276
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    Just a note for anyone using a plug that CAN BE connected in reverse polarity (even the remotest possibility). Connect your external power connector to the aircraft power system through a reverse current relay. This is simply a relay that is activated by power supplied by the external supply and 'filtered' through a diode.

    Polarity correct = current is able to flow through the diode and closes the reverse current relay, applying external power to the ships system.

    Polarity reversed = current is blocked by the diode, the reverse current relay does not close, and the ship is protected.

    If you chose to use a NATO DC plug like Ted shows in his pics, note that the little pin is internally connected to the positive large pin. That little pin can be used to run power through a diode to the reverse current relay for your protection circuit.

    Don't need a reverse current relay? I'll be happy to print you some new wires when you need them. And help you buy new avionics, a battery, possibly an alternator, . . . .

    Web
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  37. #2277
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    Thank you for the excellent follow up advice Web.

    Zoom into the picture of my plug. For electrical novices, such as myself, you can see I labeled the plugs with a Sharpie. ����

  38. #2278
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    Wireweinie,

    Is there a recommended way to protect the a/c circuit when a lowly rampie connects that NATO plug hooked up to 24V to your 12V plane? Cause I dodged that bullet this past winter - don't know how everything in the panel wasn't fried. I'm wondering if the relay can be designed to turn on for 12V positive ONLY and prevent both reverse current as well as over-voltage.

    BTW this is in my '55 180 so not experimental.


    Quote Originally Posted by wireweinie View Post
    Just a note for anyone using a plug that CAN BE connected in reverse polarity (even the remotest possibility). Connect your external power connector to the aircraft power system through a reverse current relay. This is simply a relay that is activated by power supplied by the external supply and 'filtered' through a diode.

    Polarity correct = current is able to flow through the diode and closes the reverse current relay, applying external power to the ships system.

    Polarity reversed = current is blocked by the diode, the reverse current relay does not close, and the ship is protected.

    If you chose to use a NATO DC plug like Ted shows in his pics, note that the little pin is internally connected to the positive large pin. That little pin can be used to run power through a diode to the reverse current relay for your protection circuit.

    Don't need a reverse current relay? I'll be happy to print you some new wires when you need them. And help you buy new avionics, a battery, possibly an alternator, . . . .

    Web

  39. #2279
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    I've been trying to think of a simple system to make this happen. I think the safest way to monitor for incorrect external voltage would be to place a toggle switch in series with the reverse current diode. Then connect a voltmeter to the external power plug. Line guy plugs into your aircraft, you look at the voltmeter, and if you like what you see, flip on the toggle and the aircraft is connected to external power.
    As for an 'automatic' system, I think installing a crowbar circuit on the reverse current relay should work. Wire up the reverse current relay with the diode in series with the relay coil. Install a circuit breaker in series with the diode. Now install a crowbar, over voltage module in parallel with the relay coil (positive wire from the OV module to the positive terminal on the coil and the negative wire from the OV module to the negative terminal on the relay coil). During normal operation the OV module remains open and does not effect the circuit. If external power is applied that is above the trip point voltage of the OV module, the module closes and becomes a short circuit, which will cause the circuit breaker to trip, which in turn prevents the reverse current relay from closing.
    B&C makes a crowbar over voltage module for the SD-8 alternator. Part number 504-1 gets the whole kit, but I'm sure that if you called them you could get the module alone. This module is set at 16 volts for a trip point, so anything above 16 volts will cause it to short circuit.

    Web
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  40. #2280
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Thank you Web. Awesome info. I know it takes a lot of time to research and post and I GREATLY appreciate your input!!

    On another note I am well into my annual condition inspection. This year I had a leaking exhaust valve. Staking it helped and a borescope inspection indicated crud on the valve seat. We were able to lap it in situ (in place) which cleaned up the seat and restored the compression. I then went out and got my own borescope so I could inspect all valves and cylinders. I got the Vividia 980 model. In the process of looking at the internet I found this by Mike Busch via AOPA and thought it had some really interesting stuff that I was very surprised by.........

    One pervasive old wives’ tale has it that compression readings in the high 70s are excellent, in the low 70s are good, in the high 60s are marginal, in the low 60s are poor, and anything below 60/80 is unairworthy. Another widely accepted old wives’ tale is that an engine with compressions in the low 60s is a “tired engine” that will not put out full rated horsepower. Both are dead wrong.
    More than three decades ago, Continental Motors issued a service bulletin (M84-15) debunking the first of these superstitions by establishing a new go/no-go criterion for compression tests: the master orifice tool. Mechanics who followed this guidance were astonished to find that compression readings in the low- to mid-40s were deemed acceptable by Continental.
    This 1984 guidance was based on a series of engineering studies performed using an IO-550 engine mounted in the dynamometer test cell at the Continental factory in Mobile, Alabama. Those studies revealed that when the compression ring gaps on the IO-550’s pistons were filed oversize intentionally to reduce the compression of all six cylinders to 40/80, there was no measurable loss of horsepower output (although there was an increase in oil consumption). This effectively debunked the “tired engine” old wives’ tale.
    Enter the borescope
    Nineteen years later, Continental threw mechanics another curveball by issuing Service Bulletin SB03-3 (which superseded M84-15), directing that a borescope inspection of each cylinder be performed at each annual and 100-hour inspection, and any other time that a compression test is done. It further made it clear that the borescope, not the compression tester, was to be the gold standard for assessing the airworthiness of a cylinder. It directed that if a cylinder flunks a compression test but the borescope reveals no obvious cause for the low compression, then the engine is to be flown for at least 45 minutes and the compression test be redone. Only if a cylinder flunks its compression test twice in a row (with at least 45 minutes of flying in between) is it deemed unairworthy.
    Continental’s SB03-3 was pretty shocking to mechanics when it was first published in March 2003. In those days, few GA maintenance shops owned a borescope (unless they did a lot of turbine work), and there was no training available to mechanics on how to use one to inspect a piston aircraft engine cylinder. Most A&P schools still don’t teach anything about how to use borescopes in piston engine maintenance.
    The service bulletin recommended using a low-cost rigid optical borescope—the Lenox Autoscope, which was so named because it was designed for automotive use, and at more than $2,000 was one-tenth the cost of the fiber-optic borescopes being used for turbine engine hot-section inspections. Still, lots of mechanics and small GA maintenance shops were not amused by being told that they had to shell out two large to buy one of these instruments. Fourteen years later, some A&Ps still don’t own a borescope.I was an early adopter of borescopy. Having gone through the painful experience of pulling cylinders because of low compression readings, only to find nothing physically wrong with them, I was anxious to adopt this more enlightened way of evaluating cylinder condition. I borrowed a Lenox Autoscope from a shop on my field and began inspecting the 12 cylinders on my Cessna 310. It was an eye-opening experience, almost as if I could climb inside each combustion chamber—or at least stuff one eyeball inside. Over the years, the compression test has proved untrustworthy and prone to false positives, resulting in tens of thousands of cylinders being removed unnecessarily (including a few of mine). That’s why the SB03-3 guidance calls for any disqualifying compression test that is not corroborated by borescope evidence be retested after flying for at least 45 minutes. That’s excellent advice. I’ve seen many cases where a cylinder that flunked the first compression test easily passed the second one. In one notable case involving a Cirrus SR22, a cylinder that tested at 38/80 (and that the shop doing the annual wanted to yank) wound up measuring 72/80 on the retest after a one-hour flight.
    SB03-3 did not go so far as to recommend that borescope inspections should replace the venerable compression test. Continental couldn’t do that, because the requirement to perform a compression test is written into the FARs (Part 43, Appendix D). But SB03-3 did all it could to convey that Continental is no big fan of the compression test for determining cylinder airworthiness. (A senior Continental executive once confessed to me that if they could’ve dropped the compression test altogether, they would have.)


    Bottom line. Inside of the cyls and valves look good. Not hardly any carbon build up (probably due to running lean of peak) and no "over temp" indicators as well. Crosshatch looks good. So.....as soon as I replace the engine mounts I think we can call the engine healthy and get this thing back on floats and hopefully back to Alaska for another summer.

    Hope this helps

    Bill

    Last edited by Bill Rusk; 04-14-2022 at 12:57 PM.
    Very Blessed. "It's not an obsession, it's a passion"
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