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Thread: Building a Javron Cub

  1. #241
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    ENGINE WEIGHT DATA

    This is still a little incomplete but I got these numbers from Bart at Aero Sport Power. Bart is a Cub guy so he understands the weight issue. If you folks don't already know it he is one of the top engine builders out there. Someone told me the top 5 places at the Valdez Short Field TO/LND contest all had Bart engines this last year. He does great work and has an impeccable reputation. Highly recommended.

    Weights may vary

    All engines have fuel system, 2 mags, starter


    ECI O-375-C2A 283.5LBS
    ECI O-320-D2A 276LBS
    ECI IO-340 280LBS
    LYCOMING O-360-A1A 285LBS
    SUPERIOR O-360-A1A 284LBS

    So a NEW 0-360 is going to be very close to 285 pds, an 0-320 will be 276 or approx 10 pounds lighter.

    My 0-360 engine built by Bart (with extra attention to weight) came in at 270. That is with a carb, pmags, flywheel (lightened) and starter.

    Bill
    Very Blessed.
    Thanks CalAeroNaut thanked for this post

  2. #242

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    Good Stuff Bill. I should have weighed my wood stringers but I didn't think of it at the time. My stringers are on my plane now.

  3. #243
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    Slide the shaft of the reamer through the hinge barrel first and turn the reamer as you draw the flutes the rest of the way through. It stays really straight that way, especially when reaming the double barrel side.
    With guns, we are 'citizens'. Without them, we are 'subjects'.
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  4. #244
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Docstory

    Like I said there are some really sharp folks on this site.....Great tip. Thank you

    Bill
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  5. #245
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    Instead of driving the bushings in, use a bolt with a washer between the head and the bushing. Place another washer on the end pulling on the hinge. Put on the nut and tighten with wrenches. The bushing will pull in with no distortion and you can get a good snug fit.

  6. #246
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    Hey Bill,
    Superior have just bought out an IO408 rated at 230hp on Avgas or 218hp on Mogas, i wonder what the weight of this is? and with a Catto prop it should bring it back into something we can work with? i like the option of running on Mogas..
    cheers,
    Phil

  7. #247
    mongo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pfjay52 View Post
    Hey Bill,
    Superior have just bought out an IO408 rated at 230hp on Avgas or 218hp on Mogas, i wonder what the weight of this is? and with a Catto prop it should bring it back into something we can work with? i like the option of running on Mogas..
    cheers,
    Phil
    Website says 295
    PIG

  8. #248
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Nut plates

    One of the great things about building your own Cub is you get to use nut plates. No stripped out screws. Well....mostly. You can strip out a nut plate but it is a lot less likely than stripping out a sheet metal screw. I personally have a problem with sheet metal screws because it seems like they are always stripped out and that drives me bonkers. So .....I use nut plates for EVERYTHING. There are basically two types. Tinnerman and regular. Tinnerman are easy to use, some just slip on the tabs and some are riveted in and some are just held on by the friction of the threads.


    From the top right....the first two things are tinnerman nut plates, then the next three are different shaped regular nut plates. The screws are from left to right....Tinnerman (type B), sheetmetal (type A), and machine screw. Note that you can (in a pinch) use a sheetmetal type A screw in a tinnerman nut plate but it is not really correct. You should use a tinnerman type B screw for tinnerman nut plates.

    On the Backcountry and Javron kits you will see a lot of tabs in the baggage area and generally all over. This is for you to attach the interior panels to. They look like this................



    These are designed for a tinnerman. You will need to enlarge the hole a little ( I use a #22 drill or 5/32 same thing) then you just slip a tinnerman on and you are good to go. Looks like this............



    Tinnermans work fine but one of the lessons learned from my last Cub was that it was a pain to have a wide mix of screws. #6 and #8 Tinnerman plus #6 and #8 sheetmetal and #6 and #8 machine screws. What a hassle, so this time I am trying to use #6 machine screws as much as possible. In order to do that it takes more time to install regular nutplates. They would look like this for the little tabs. You have to use the mini corner nut plates............



    Note - you can use clecos to hold your cardboard interior patterns in place. Looks like this........



    This works REALLY well as they are in the exact same place each time you take them in and out to get the fit just right. You can also put a piece of tape over the hole to reinforce it if you start to wear it loose. But the reason I am talking about this here is that you do not want to drill out and enlarge the tab holes or put your nutplates on until after you have made all the patterns. After you drill out the holes the clecos will not fit. So...... make all your interior patterns, and even the actual interior panels, cleco it all you want......THEN put your nut plates in. Don't get the cart before the horse here or you will not be able to use the cleco trick which is REALLY handy.

    More to follow

    Bill
    Very Blessed.

  9. #249
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    So lets put some nut plates in the boot cowl channels. If we start about 1 inch down from the top tube and put them about 3"s apart you will have 8 nut plates and they will end about 1 inch above the bottom tube. It will look like this.........





    So mark your holes, center punch them, and drill. I prefer to start with a #40 drill, then I enlarge it to a #28 (9/64). This is the size needed for the drill jig. It looks like this and is one of the absolute must have tools.



    Note I took a marker and wrote the two drill sizes on the tool. #40 and #28. This helps those of us that don't do this every day. Use the drill jig to drill the rivet holes. Then enlarge the main screw hole to a #22 drill. This is so the screw will not hang up on the structure enroute to the actual nut plate. Now you must debur the back side of all the holes. You can spin a larger drill in there sometimes and that will work quick and easy. Sometimes you will have to get creative to get to the back side to debur the holes but you must do so. Now use a countersink on the rivet holes for the flush rivets. You will pretty much always have to use flush rivets to make things fit up tight with nut plates. Squeeze some rivets. You will have to make a squeezer head to go in the channel. I took an AN3 bolt and sanded it down so that it fit inside the channel. So there you are putting nut plates in the aft belly access panel area and you can't get the squeezer in there. Just won't fit. Ain't gonna happen. Looks like this.........



    Trick

    You can squeeze flush rivets just fine with a pair of smooth jaw pliers like these. Jason Gerard turned me on to these and I must admit they are useful for all sorts of things including rivet squeezing........



    Get them from McMaster-Carr.



    They will also come in handy when doing the nut plates for the top front skylight/windscreen area. There are 6 screws across the top. The outside ones are right next to the channel so you will use the one lug nut plates there and std two lug plates in the middle.

    The one lug nut plate is on the left and the std 2 lug nut plate is on the right in this photo...........




    From the outside holes you will have 24 inches to put in 4 nutplates so they will be 4' 25.5/32 apart. Give or take. If you are doing a widebody cub I would use 7 nut plates and that way the center nut plate will be right on the centerline of the windscreen. This is what the outside nut plates would look like............





    When drilling the holes be sure to put something under the piece you are drilling so that when the bit comes out it does not scratch up the tube under it. Looks like this.............




    So we have learned a bit about nut plates. I hope this helps. Again...folks.....I am not a pro but this might get you started. You can also go to youtube and search nut plates and there are some "how to" videos there as well.

    Bill
    Very Blessed.

  10. #250
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Another thought. If you are building a Cub or even thinking about it I recommend you go to the Backcountry website and download their builders manual. They have been kind enough to make it available to all for free....THANK YOU BACKCOUNTRY.....very nice and generous.

    http://supercub.com/html/manual/Assembly_Manual.pdf

    Hope this helps

    Bill
    Very Blessed.

  11. #251
    pittsdriver's Avatar
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    Now Bill, when it comes time to screw everything together all the phillips screws will line up won't they. I did that on my Cub and it's fun when somebody notices that, it blows their mind. It only takes a second to line them up when you are putting them in. i am in the habit of doing it on everything now. And I agree about nutplates and tinnerman nuts, the only way to go. Don
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  12. #252
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    Nutplates are great! I also used some keyed rivnuts in the piper channel and had great luck, plus they're fast. Just don't abuse and cross thread...you might get a spinner. I've had no probs, but I'm careful. Rivnuts are LIGHT, but we're talking grams, not ounces.

  13. #253
    mike mcs repair's Avatar
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    no bother with nut plates in channels.... ever.......

    you are trying to hold flexing airframe with .020" aluminum.....
    Likes flylow liked this post

  14. #254

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    Good stuff Bill,

    I am a Nut Plate Junkie. I too nut plated my boot cowl and everything else I could do. I also labeled my nut plate jigs too.

    Speaking of jigs, they are a must when nut plating, however there are times when the jigs will not fit in the location to be nut plated. I used the actual nut plate as a jig..drilled the screw hole, tightened the nut plate then drilled thru the rivet holes. If you are going to drill the holes at one time then go back and rivet them at one time, DO NOT use the same nut plate for drilling all of the rivet holes. Eventually, the holes in the nut plate will wallow out and all the holes will be off. Don't ask me how I know this.

    Nut plating is A LOT of extra work but the end result is waaaaaay worth it!

  15. #255
    DW's Avatar
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    Great photo log Bill can't wait to get out there and see it.

  16. #256
    fobjob's Avatar
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    Love to watch you gittin after it, Bill...

  17. #257
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    Bill,
    Something to think about - make tail gap seals with balsa wood. I decided to repaint my rudder so picked up a 3/4" square X 3' piece of balsa at the local hobby shop. Cut a concave groove on one side by running it through the table saw at an angle. Cut the two adjacent sides at about 15 degrees. Rounded off the fourth side and glued it to the rudder spar. Covered it with a 3" tape, done. I left about a 1/16" gap between the fin and rudder and allowed for pulling the hinge pins. I don't know if I'll get any more rudder control or not, but it certainly cleans up the gap. You could glue the balsa to the tubing and would not need any extra fabric tapes.
    N1PA

  18. #258
    Roger Peterson's Avatar
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    Hi Bill, after years of having every type of fastener know to man fall out of my planes, we have decided to pop rivet everything except the panels that come off regular. Soft alum rivets drill out very easy and don't take long to put them back. Just a dab of the perm locktite on the stem, stops them from spinning when drilling out.

    Like your workmanship. Come help on our plane anytime.

  19. #259
    mike mcs repair's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skywagon8a View Post
    Bill,
    Something to think about - make tail gap seals with balsa wood. I decided to repaint my rudder so picked up a 3/4" square X 3' piece of balsa at the local hobby shop. Cut a concave groove on one side by running it through the table saw at an angle. Cut the two adjacent sides at about 15 degrees. Rounded off the fourth side and glued it to the rudder spar. Covered it with a 3" tape, done. I left about a 1/16" gap between the fin and rudder and allowed for pulling the hinge pins. I don't know if I'll get any more rudder control or not, but it certainly cleans up the gap. You could glue the balsa to the tubing and would not need any extra fabric tapes.
    curious what happens with ice buildup... even just the wind moving it around....

  20. #260

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    Skyview

    Bill, It may to early to ask, I know you are thinking about the Skyview. If you do go with that and I follow your lead at some point. I am curious if the New Skyview will have options for all of the instrument/gps reading on one screen. If so is that a good Idea? You know my situation is it good or bad for me. Pro"s and Con"s. If it to early for this questions I am patient. Sorry if I didnt find it, if you've already talked on this subject. Thank You Greg

  21. #261
    Roger Peterson's Avatar
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    I am putting a Skyview in now and it has the options for all instruments, Moving map and synthetic vision on one screen. If you are looking at a screen not showing instruments, it will alarm if one goes out of range.

  22. #262

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    Thank You Roger. I really appreciate you guys.

  23. #263
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Thanks guys for all the inputs. Don, you and I will be the ones at the fly in wearing the T shirt that says " Is the word Anal Retentive hyphenated? "
    Pete - I have used that trick on models and even on a Hatz Biplane. It does work well. I will have to think about that.
    Roger - I can see where that would work well in some applications.
    Greg - I have not really gotten into the avionics yet. I have a concern that the Skyview may have too much info in a small place so I have not locked in to that just yet. But that is strictly a personal opinion. I do anticipate going glass again. It is simple and light. Key word = LIGHT. I do like the Ifly700 GPS and will probably have that in the panel somewhere.

    I have decided to go with half a skylight. Saves 25oz when using .100 thick plexiglass. I do not feel it will be a significant deterrent for my passengers as they will still have the side glass and will also get the light from the forward skylight portion. I will still have the visibility I need through the skylight when making tight turns or searching for traffic. It will not be as airy as the L-19 glass configuration, but...... oh well. The PA-12 has no skylight at all and I certainly do not mind flying that. So.....after great consideration this is the nutplate pattern for the skylight......







    So the fabric will go to the center of the top structure and the glass will go forward of that. I am a little concerned that the fabric will try to warp the C channel so I will need to be careful of that but I think this will work well, provide ample visibility and save a little weight as well. I know some of the folks building ultra light cubs have used fabric for the top with no skylight at all but I think I would like to have the visibility through the top for maneuvering flight. This is all personal preference folks and one of the great things about experimental is you can do things like this.

    Hope this helps

    Bill
    Very Blessed.

  24. #264
    Olibuilt's Avatar
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    I used .080 cheap plexi for all the glass in my white cub. A little lighter. No problem since installed more than a year ago. Not there yet in my build but I plan using something a little lighter. Maybe .060 lexan.

  25. #265
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    COMPOSITE FLOOR BOARDS

    I finally got this all sorted out after mucho effort. It is totally insane how much time was invested in this one area. I can now save you a lot of time. If you are interested in this stuff....call Jay Derosier at Javron. He is stocking this stuff now and can even precut your floor boards from this stuff using a CAD program. I am using three different products on this build. My last Smithcub had the honeycomb floor boards and it saves a lot of weight. A normal set of floor boards weighs about 18 pounds. This stuff will weigh in at about 7.5 saving over ten pounds. Thats huge folks. It may not quite as durable as ply wood so if you are really going to use your cub hard, to haul tools in to build your cabin (post hole diggers, augers, sledge hammers, rebar, etc) maybe ply would be better. But I am really thinking mine will mostly be camping gear and if I need to haul some nasty stuff I will lay a thin piece of plywood in for that mission.
    The 1/8 inch material weighs .23 pounds per Sq ft, which is about the same as .016 2024T3. I used this for the top baggage floor, back wall of the top and bottom cargo bays, and will be using it for the side walls of the bottom aft (extended cargo) cargo bay. It is quite rigid so you must plan your installation as you can't fold or bend it to get it in place, but the rigidity makes it look nice when installed. Sometimes things that flex and sag tend to look flimsy. This particular brand is an off white color and I think it will look fine without any additional surface paint, fabric, etc. thus also saving weight. My last cub had the .016 AL covered with fabric. It looked nice but the weight with glue and fabric came in at about twice the weight of bare AL. The weight penalty for fabric in the cargo area was about 4 pounds. You could just use bare AL but you may have to go to .020 as .016 is pretty flimsy without some type of fabric on it.
    This whole area is pretty subjective folks and you have to decide what works for you and what penalty you are willing to pay for aesthetics. I want my cub to look reasonably nice (That is opinion too as what is nice to me, may not be to you) and yet still be light. Obviously the lightest cub will have no interior at all, then you can step up from there to a fully finished Cub that looks awesome and weighs a ton. So you have to find that middle place that works for you. Keep in mind that you rarely, like .....NEVER...., hear someone complain that their Cub is TOO light.
    So...... all that said....my last Cub was pretty light and I was happy with the interior look. I am hoping to achieve the same aesthetics (for me) and make it a little lighter along the way.

    Another thought if I may. Dark interiors are dark. DUH. You can't see in there. Look in the floor area of a Cub with black floorboards. You can't see squat. The light does not reflect. My last Cub had white floor boards and although it showed a little dirt I really liked being able to look down and see something I had dropped. I recommend you do a little research here. Go to a couple of fly ins and look at the floor near the forward rudder pedals of a bunch of airplanes with this specifically in mind. Then decide what works for you.
    All that said, the purpose, was to say I prefer light colored interiors and thus I think I will be OK with the bare composite honeycomb that I used. Different composites have different natural colors so you may end up painting yours to suit your taste. Don't forget to include that in your weight calculations. If you get this stuff from Jay it will be this, kinda off white, color.

    I used a 1/4 inch thick, 1ply, composite for the cargo floor. Weighs .26 pounds per Sq ft. I will be using a 1/4 inch, 2ply, composite for the cockpit floorboards. Stronger than the single ply material but weighs .46 pds sq ft. A light plywood will weigh .85 pds sq ft. Hardware store ply will weigh 1.5pds sq ft. or more.
    You will have close to 18 sq ft in floor board area depending on narrow body or wide body so this stuff can add up fast. If you use hardware store plywood at 1.5 you will weigh in at 27 pounds plus finish. Composites will weigh in at 7.5 so you just added 20 pounds to your cub. If you are going to use plywood make sure you use the lightest stuff you can find.

    So here are a few pictures of the beginnings of my composite floor boards for the baggage compartments.











    I have not started building the boxes around the rudder cables yet...... don't panic, I won't leave them exposed. Carbon fiber for those.

    Source info for the composite floors is in post #268 below

    Hope this helps

    Bill
    Last edited by Bill Rusk; 12-03-2015 at 08:11 AM.
    Very Blessed.

  26. #266
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    Hi Bill,
    you are about a month in front of me. i haven't had time to unpack my kit yet and had to leave for work late last week, i won't be home 'till the middle of next month, but you have given me plenty to think about. i was looking at something similar, a sandwich constructed panel for the same areas you are fitting. does your material have a name ?? how do you plan on fixing it? do you have some wide load bearing fittings to spread the load? what about the areas under your feet? do you plan to reinforce/protect them with some extra plating or material.
    great job Bill.
    thanks,
    Phil

  27. #267
    Roger Peterson's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the info Bill, saves a lot of work. Wondering where you do all the work as the shop looks way to clean to have done any of it in there. Project looks great, wish I was closer would like to come over and take a good close look.
    Keep up the posts.
    I am leaving the skylight out of mine as I don't ever seem to use it.

  28. #268
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Phil

    I understand about work, it sure gets in the way of our hobbies. The composite is usually called "flat panel" composite stock. There are several companies that make it including Gilfab, Nordam etc. The problem is they will not return your call unless you tell them you work for Boeing or Airbus. Then they will ask what company you work for and tell you that they have a min order of 100 sheets, etc. It is a huge pain. Just call Jay.

    Update
    I left the specific information on the composite source out of my original post because, at one time, I thought Jay at Javron was going to carry it. But apparently he has not been flooded with calls for the stuff and so I guess he is not going to be a "distributor". It took a TON of time to find this stuff. I will add it to the shopping list but here is the info.......

    AAR Precision Systems 727-539-8585 14201 Meyerlake Cir. Clearwater FL 33760

    ATR-FP-121F1 this is 1/8 th inch. I used it for the floor of the upper baggage and the back wall. It is very light but not strong enough for cargo floor or floorboards. At the time I got it, it was 284 dollars for a 4' X 8' sheet. I tried to use it for the side walls in the cargo area but it did not really work out.

    ATR-FP-251F1 - 1/4 inch stuff I used for cargo floors, seat backs etc. The "F1" in the name means it is one layer of glass. 340 dollars for a 4 x 8 sheet

    ATR-FP-251F2 - 1/4 inch again but two layers of glass. I used this for the front and rear floorboards. 455 dollars a sheet

    Light ain't cheap



    In the event of a torn/broken piece I think I would be inclined to replace rather than repair. All of the panels are placed, cut and installed such that they can be removed relatively easily. I believe that it will be plenty strong to span the areas of the structure and I do not plan to put any scuff plates under the heel areas next to the brake/rudder pedals. As those areas get scratched up it just becomes part of the patina of a well flown and used Cub. You could certainly epoxy a piece of Stainless or something there if you wanted to. Adds weight.
    I do not plan to put a bunch of reinforcements around the holes. There is little to no lateral force on the cargo floors so the screws are just there to keep it from coming up with negative G's, and the cockpit floor is the two ply which is much stronger that the single ply used in the cargo area so I think it is going to work fine. Did the last time, but I admit I only got a little over 100 hours on it before......swimming. I guess this is my part of the "experimental" concept.
    Roger - thanks for the compliments. Anytime you, or anyone else, is in the Chicago area you are more than welcome to come by. The airport is C77 just outside Rockford Illinois.
    I gotta throw in a THANK YOU here to Mark Rusche who has been helping on this. Mark is an engineer and he is my go to guy for technical info. Also to Jim Preise and Buck Wyndam who helped on the last build and are right in here on this one. And that folks is half the fun. It is just a lot more fun to have several guys building, joking, and working together. It is all about the people. I am Blessed to have friends like these guys. A lot of folks have helped me, and thus this thread is just to try to pay it back/forward.

    Hope this helps

    Bill
    Last edited by Bill Rusk; 12-03-2015 at 08:10 AM.
    Very Blessed.

  29. #269
    Dave Calkins's Avatar
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    ...about those rudder cables where they pass through the aft baggage area...
    .....carbon fiber "boxes" sound like alot of work.....and will be kindof "boxy" looking.
    Routing the cables through plastic tubing will keep them from being fouled on cargo. Aerocet does something like this to route cables inside their floats.

    It's simple, cheap, light, and easy.

  30. #270
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    Bill, re enforcements are really fast and easy to do. Drill all the holes for your mounting screws. On the bottom side use a 1/2" hole saw and drill out the back side laminate and honeycomb leaving the top side laminate intact. Put a piece of masking tape over the screw hole on the top and fill the 1/2" hole with a fairly thick mixture of resin and flox. When set redrill the hole, countersink and you have a really strong mount. Don't even need a tinnerman washer for strength this way. Don
    PS I built a Lancair 360 so I did LOTS of work with honeycomb.
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  31. #271
    Dave Calkins's Avatar
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    DonPittsdriver...Hi. Have you used the "bent nail" trick??
    1. drill your mounting holes in the floorboards
    2. make an "L" bend in a nail and chuck it in your drill
    3. insert the "L" into the hole and spin the drill a moment
    4. vacuum out the "core" material that the L-nail disrupted
    5. tape one side of the hole and squirt thickened epoxy into the untaped side of the hole
    6. re drill the holes

    This method captures the "thickenened epoxy bushing" inside both skins.

    If you've tried it, is there a reason you prefer the "hole saw" method. Thanks. DAVE

  32. #272
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    ELT

    I elected to get the Kannad ELT. This is a 406/121.5 unit with an internal GPS. It is the lightest ELT I could find and as best as I can tell about 1.5 pounds lighter than the other fixed ELT units. It weighs 1.87 pounds with the batteries. That does not include the mount or antenna. Yes, I did drill into a fuselage tube. I know some folks do not like to do this but I feel it is stronger than adell clamps and I did not drill into a longeron or other critical structure. So I am comfortable. Perhaps if you will be building a Javron cub you could have Jay weld on some tabs for this.

    Here are some pictures.









    Hope this helps

    Bill
    Very Blessed.

  33. #273
    pittsdriver's Avatar
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    Dave, The epoxy with flox is a lot stronger than straight epoxy and it was just the way Lancair had you do it. Also run a flat blade screwdriver around all the edges about 1/8-1/4" in and fill with epoxy/micro to seal them. West Systems is the best epoxy to use. Don
    Vans RV7 finished 2008
    Backcountry Super Cub finished 2011
    A&P Aircraft rebuilding, Building assistance
    1956 Supercub complete rebuild

  34. #274
    Dave Calkins's Avatar
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    Don, I mentioned "thickened" epoxy...you could use whatever thickener you like. A 'cake decorator' bag (folded paper cone filled with "goo") works great to distribute the mixture.....a "ziplock" filled with the mixture and the corner cut off works, too.

    The "bushing" is captured by more skin area, seemingly, with the bent nail trick. I see this as advantageous. ...just thought I'd mention that.

    Also, have been up to my elbows in WEST, MAS, System Three (Silver Tip, General Purpose, and also the new Five-One, plus QuickFair) Devcon, Dubro, etc, etc, etc,

    Is there a reason why you prefer WEST? Thanks for your answers.

    Bill Rusk....Not that you should worry, but we have had problems with Kanad's Antennas...seems we are not the only operators.....also, seems like it is only on the turbines, not on the recips. The antennas are breaking internally, and you cannot tell by looking at it......you can tell by pulling up on the wire and the top wire pulls out ...FYI. Looks like we'll be replacing them with "blade" antennas.

    DAVE.

  35. #275
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Dave and Don

    Thanks for the tips gents. Don - where do you get Flox?

    I like the bent nail trick. That seems like it might be a player.

    Dave - Kannad has three different antennas, based on speed. The whip for us slow guys, a mid speed unit for turbo props, and then the blade for jets. I will look into that. I had not read or heard of any problems from the antenna they recommend for recips. Perhaps it is limited to the mid speed band range unit. Hope so.

    Thanks for the help, I learn from you guys every day.

    Bill
    Very Blessed.

  36. #276
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    Dave, I like the West as it is pretty idiot proof (this is important when a guy like me is working with anything) with their pump dispensers on the cans. It sands really well and will stick to about anything. I also developed a severe allergy to the Jeffco I was using on the Lancair and West doesn't affect me as much. Thinking about it I think your bent nail trick would work really slick. Sure be a lot faster than my way.
    Bill, Spruce calls it Flocked Cotton Fiber pn 01-14780. You will also need some Micro. Spruce calls it glass bubbles pn 01-14600. Be aware the flox mixture is a bear to sand so only use it for re enforcements. The micro really sands nice so use it on edges and filets. I also laid up my windshield fairing in glass and it is stronger and lighter than the metal and fits perfect. It is pretty easy to do and another little detail that guys that know Cubs think is really cool. Don
    Vans RV7 finished 2008
    Backcountry Super Cub finished 2011
    A&P Aircraft rebuilding, Building assistance
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  37. #277

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    Bill,

    I use US Composites http://www.uscomposites.com/index.html for resins, fillers and glass.

    Jack

  38. #278
    Dave Calkins's Avatar
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    I use Plaschem Supply and Consulting to source nearly all the composite materials. (907) 274-5505

    Don, I love the idea of composite windshield retainer.

    I've done composite wing root fairings and the fit is as good as can be gotten......slap a bunch of masking tape across the wing root to fuselage and windshield gaps, wax it a couple of times and then lay 2 layers of 6 ounce carbon bidirectional over the waxed masking tape....VOILA! and lightweight, also!

    Bill, the part number for the failing antenna's is....I'll find it later and post it. D

  39. #279
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    Here is the windshield fairing. Only took a couple hours total to do. I messed with the stock metal fairing for hours trying to get it to lay down perfect with no dents or puckers. I've never seen a metal one on a Cub that looked good.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    Vans RV7 finished 2008
    Backcountry Super Cub finished 2011
    A&P Aircraft rebuilding, Building assistance
    1956 Supercub complete rebuild

  40. #280
    halestorm's Avatar
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    pittsdriver

    That's a great looking fairing! Did you lay it up in place over the boot cowl and windscreen or did you use an aluminum fairing as a mold?

    Sam

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