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Thread: Scott 3200 Taiwheel refurbishment

  1. #41
    wireweinie's Avatar
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    Grease depends on how the airplane is used. I treat it like a boat trailer wheel. On assembly, I just pack the bearings and cover the internals. If the guy works the airplane hard and lands on a lot of beaches or dirt strips, I tell them to pump grease through them quite often. This will push grease and water out and leave relatively clean grease inside. Works for the swivel assembly and the axle, both. But there is no substitute for cleaning them and repacking them, at LEAST every annual. More often if you play in the dirt.

    Web

  2. #42
    kiwicubber's Avatar
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    Slightly off topic, but what is the difference between the 3200 and 3200A tailwheel?
    Are they interchangeable?

    cheers Bill
    Bill and Neroli.
    www.supercub.co.nz

  3. #43
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    I will have to ask Bill Duncan the difference. I believe they are interchangable. Might be the heavy duty steering arm.
    Steve Pierce

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  4. #44

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    Great thread! After watching Steve's videos (thanks Steve!) and receiving my ABI rebuild kit I am pereplexed on how to remove the bearing race (16). Did I miss something? I also had all 5 springs (7) in my Citabria 7GCBC. All but 1 pin had sheared on the thrust plate (6). Should I go back with 3 or all 5 springs? Thx all

  5. #45
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Sometimes I can run a few beads in the race with my TIG and it will fall out when I smack it. Other times I have to weld a large washer to it. If it isn't to bad I don't worry about it, doesn't rotate like the wheel bearing.
    Steve Pierce

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  6. #46

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    Steve thanks for the ultra-quick response. I may re-inspect and reuse the race if OK. Otherwise I have several friends with MIGs and TIGs to put a bead or washer. Thanks again Steve!

  7. #47

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    Can anyone recommend an aviation-friendly spring shop in the lower 48 to get some tail wheel leaf springs re-arched?

    George

  8. #48
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    My Dad uses a shop in Memphis. I can get contact information but any local spring shop can do it.
    Steve Pierce

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  9. #49
    Ursa Major's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Pierce View Post
    any local spring shop can do it.
    Some shops might not want to work on "airplane stuff". They had no problem re arching a spring set for my "field mower".
    Mike
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  10. #50
    CamTom12's Avatar
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    "atv" ?

  11. #51
    hotrod180's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Pierce View Post
    .... but any local spring shop can do it.
    I live in Podunk Washington now, but until I was 35 I lived in southwest Los Angeles--
    I don't recall ever seeing a "spring shop".
    Cessna Skywagon-- accept no substitute!

  12. #52
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Pretty common to re-arch springs on big trucks. Pretty common in a large metropolitan area, usually around big truck repair shops.
    Steve Pierce

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  13. #53
    Jim Hann's Avatar
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    St. Louis Spring did my 22/20 spring. Cash, no receipt, no evidence.

  14. #54

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    Any truck suspension and brake shop should be able to do it. If you have a heavy truck and trailer repair shop around, they should be able to handle it too. Go downtown and look for the old Chevy pickup with a 12" lift. Flag that redneck down and he'll be able to point you in the direction of a capable shop!
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  15. #55

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    Scott tail wheels

    Quote Originally Posted by kiwicubber View Post
    Slightly off topic, but what is the difference between the 3200 and 3200A tailwheel?
    Are they interchangeable?

    cheers Bill
    I belive the 3200 is for the flat spring(used on cubs). The other T/W is for those aircraft that uses the round spring (Cessna 180 or 185). Hope this helps. Best Cliff

  16. #56

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    The "A" model uses a different steering arm. See page 5 of the attachment. Hard to understand why the Univair price is so much different for such a small change. http://www.supercub.org/photopost/da...emblies800.pdf

  17. #57
    hotrod180's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clifford View Post
    I belive the 3200 is for the flat spring(used on cubs). The other T/W is for those aircraft that uses the round spring (Cessna 180 or 185). Hope this helps. Best Cliff
    Incorrect, the Scott (and ABI) 3400 series is for the "stinger" tail spring.
    3200 is standard leaf-spring-mount t/w,
    3200A (actually 3224A) is a 3200 with upturned steering arm,
    3200-3 is for two-bolt mounting.

    https://www.airframesalaska.com/3200...els-s/1871.htm
    Cessna Skywagon-- accept no substitute!
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  18. #58
    j3cubcapt's Avatar
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    Where can I find these videos of Steve’s?
    Thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by DocTX View Post
    Great thread! After watching Steve's videos (thanks Steve!) and receiving my ABI rebuild kit I am pereplexed on how to remove the bearing race (16). Did I miss something? I also had all 5 springs (7) in my Citabria 7GCBC. All but 1 pin had sheared on the thrust plate (6). Should I go back with 3 or all 5 springs? Thx all

  19. #59
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Steve Pierce

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  20. #60
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Steve Pierce

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  21. #61
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Steve Pierce

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  22. #62
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Steve Pierce

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  23. #63
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    I need to take the time to cover some more common issues, wear items etc to add to these videos. Hopefully have time in a few weeks.
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
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  24. #64
    j3cubcapt's Avatar
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    Thanks for the links Steve, and if you can those other videos would be great.

    We thank you for your time and knowledge sharing.


    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Pierce View Post
    I need to take the time to cover some more common issues, wear items etc to add to these videos. Hopefully have time in a few weeks.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
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  25. #65
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    I was hoping that one of the assembly videos might have a secret, cut-and-dried method of adjusting the bottom nut.
    I've always had to rely on trial-and-error,
    too loose and you got shimmy and too tight and it didn't want to steer well or kick out to full swivel.
    I've been counting how many turns to full tight before disassembling,
    then tighten to the same point when reassembling after cleaning & inspecting.
    Just did that with my C180: it was one full turn looser than full tight.
    But got a little shimmy after reassembly, so pulled the wheel back off & tightened that nut 2 flats worth.
    Seems to have done the trick.
    Cessna Skywagon-- accept no substitute!

  26. #66
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hotrod180 View Post
    I was hoping that one of the assembly videos might have a secret, cut-and-dried method of adjusting the bottom nut.
    I've always had to rely on trial-and-error,
    too loose and you got shimmy and too tight and it didn't want to steer well or kick out to full swivel.
    I've been counting how many turns to full tight before disassembling,
    then tighten to the same point when reassembling after cleaning & inspecting.
    Just did that with my C180: it was one full turn looser than full tight.
    But got a little shimmy after reassembly, so pulled the wheel back off & tightened that nut 2 flats worth.
    Seems to have done the trick.
    The shimmy is because of your head angle not the tightness of the nut. You are keeping it from shimmying by making it harder to swivel. On Cubs I set it up loose so it is easy to turn and break over. It is all by feel for me.
    Steve Pierce

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  27. #67
    Eddie Foy's Avatar
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    You are just masking the problem.


    Quote Originally Posted by hotrod180 View Post
    I was hoping that one of the assembly videos might have a secret, cut-and-dried method of adjusting the bottom nut.
    I've always had to rely on trial-and-error,
    too loose and you got shimmy and too tight and it didn't want to steer well or kick out to full swivel.
    I've been counting how many turns to full tight before disassembling,
    then tighten to the same point when reassembling after cleaning & inspecting.
    Just did that with my C180: it was one full turn looser than full tight.
    But got a little shimmy after reassembly, so pulled the wheel back off & tightened that nut 2 flats worth.
    Seems to have done the trick.
    "Put out my hand and touched the face of God!"

  28. #68
    hotrod180's Avatar
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    So you're both saying that the tension on that nut doesn't matter? I don't buy that.
    I have enough experience with 3200's to know that head angle is often the cause of shimmy,
    but also enough to believe that the tension on the kingpin nut can be & often is also a factor.
    BTW this is a 10" 3400-series t/w on a C180, & the t/w head angle is fine.
    I don't think I've ever seen a C180/185 stinger that put an 8" or 10" t/w at a shimmy-inducing trailing angle.
    Cessna Skywagon-- accept no substitute!

  29. #69
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Sure, the head tension will help but if you had a good caster angle it would not shimmy. Post a picture of the head angle when loaded at the point that it shimmies.
    Steve Pierce

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  30. #70
    wireweinie's Avatar
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    The torque on the swivel bolt is to preload the bearing. The drag that's felt when trying to swivel the tailwheel is a function of the five (or whatever number you like to use) springs that apply pressure against the thrust washer, up inside the tailwheel head.

    Web
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  31. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by hotrod180 View Post
    So you're both saying that the tension on that nut doesn't matter? I don't buy that.
    I have enough experience with 3200's to know that head angle is often the cause of shimmy,
    but also enough to believe that the tension on the kingpin nut can be & often is also a factor.
    BTW this is a 10" 3400-series t/w on a C180, & the t/w head angle is fine.
    I don't think I've ever seen a C180/185 stinger that put an 8" or 10" t/w at a shimmy-inducing trailing angle.
    I don't have the big tail wheel but the only time mine has ever had a shimmy was when it was a bit low (but didn't show it) on tire pressure.
    Remember, These are the Good old Days!

  32. #72
    hotrod180's Avatar
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    50psi on the 10" t/w tire, good angle.
    I'll get a pic of the angle later today.
    Not much you can do if the angle is trailing,
    never heard of re-arching a stinger like you can a leaf spring.
    Cessna Skywagon-- accept no substitute!

  33. #73
    hotrod180's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wireweinie View Post
    The torque on the swivel bolt is to preload the bearing. The drag that's felt when trying to swivel the tailwheel is a function of the five (or whatever number you like to use) springs that apply pressure against the thrust washer, up inside the tailwheel head.
    Yes, but tightening the kingpin nut also compresses those springs.
    Don't know any other way to do it, except maybe add spacers to each spring--
    like adding washers to an oil pressure relief plunger.
    Maybe the springs are weak?
    Tailwheel is an XP Mods, installed about 7 years ago--
    not that long, so I doubt it's the springs.
    Cessna Skywagon-- accept no substitute!

  34. #74
    wireweinie's Avatar
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    The only way to adjust spring tension is to go to all five springs or remove them one at a time until it feels right for your operations. The few thousandths of an inch that you might be able to compress the bearing by over torquing it will have a negligible affect on spring tension. Any drag added is the result of excess pressure on the bearing.

    Web
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  35. #75
    RaisedByWolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Pierce View Post
    Sure, the head tension will help but if you had a good caster angle it would not shimmy. Post a picture of the head angle when loaded at the point that it shimmies.
    My baby bushwheel head is pretty loose, breaks free really easy. I did what bushwheel bill said and added a block between the spring and fuselage and the angle is good. It never shimmy’s.


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  36. #76
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Bill got a big truck mud flap and cut a bunch of spacers out of it for that purpose last time he was here.
    Steve Pierce

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  37. #77

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Pierce View Post
    Bill got a big truck mud flap and cut a bunch of spacers out of it for that purpose last time he was here.
    Was it a plastic mudflap instead of rubber? I'm sure rubber would be a bit too squishy.
    You can't get there from here. You have to go over yonder and start from there.

  38. #78
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by N86250 View Post
    Was it a plastic mudflap instead of rubber? I'm sure rubber would be a bit too squishy.
    Hard rubber from an 18 wheeler mud flap. Doesn't compress.
    Steve Pierce

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  39. #79
    www.SkupTech.com mike mcs repair's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hotrod180 View Post
    I was hoping that one of the assembly videos might have a secret, cut-and-dried method of adjusting the bottom nut.
    I've always had to rely on trial-and-error,
    too loose and you got shimmy and too tight and it didn't want to steer well or kick out to full swivel.
    I've been counting how many turns to full tight before disassembling,
    then tighten to the same point when reassembling after cleaning & inspecting.
    Just did that with my C180: it was one full turn looser than full tight.
    But got a little shimmy after reassembly, so pulled the wheel back off & tightened that nut 2 flats worth.
    Seems to have done the trick.
    you NEED TO ADD more shims under your bearing if tightening the nut stops swiveling on a cessna style scott

  40. #80
    hotrod180's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike mcs repair View Post
    you NEED TO ADD more shims under your bearing if tightening the nut stops swiveling on a cessna style scott
    Tightening 2 more flats didn't stop the swiveling,
    it's stopped the shimmying.
    Cessna Skywagon-- accept no substitute!
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