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Thread: tools, jigs, fixtures, and other neat stuff

  1. #81
    behindpropellers's Avatar
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    Wilburrrrrrrrr.... That would fit in your 185!!!

  2. #82
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    It was bugging me about the Sea Fury "Saw Bones". Finally figured out that used to be George Baker's "Sky Fury". Help build up several R3350 powered Sea Furies at my previous job and use to go to an airshow every weekend in the back seat of a dual control Mk20. Awesome airplanes.
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers

  3. #83
    Darrel Starr's Avatar
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    There is no mistaking the sound when Sawbones lights off -- you won't mistake it for a T6. They missed Reno this year and are in the process of installing another engine. The owner, Robin Crandall, is a doctor.
    Darrel
    http://sawbonesair.com/

  4. #84
    Steve's Aircraft (Brian)'s Avatar
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    Dad has been doing some 0-320 cylinder work so it has given me an opportunity to take some pictures of our cylinder holding clamp.


    This was built by another A&P friend of my dad's and was given to dad in the early 1970's. Pretty sure it was built in the late 50's.
    For some reason, dad has the cylinder mounted in backwards...it is usually mounted with the exhaust/intake ports toward the user.


    The clamp is adjustable so you can work on cylinders as small as a A-65 to as large as 0-540's


    The jig rotates around so you can do valve grinding or cylinder honing. It is also moved into this position to set in the valve retainer tool.


    This is the valve retainer tool.


    And this is the tool inserted into the cylinder to hold the valves closed.


    This is the valve spring compression tool used to remove and install valve springs.


    This is how the compression tool is used....you just have to imagine the cylinder in the correct way to see how easy it is to pull the tool toward you and compress the springs down to install the retainers.

    Brian.

  5. #85
    Steve's Aircraft (Brian)'s Avatar
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    Every shop should have a 60 year old Logan lathe.....(hell, this one is probably 70 years old or more.......)







    I also use this old valve grinder a lot.....



    This thing is indispensable when it comes to doing valve work...

    Brian.

  6. #86
    www.SkupTech.com mike mcs repair's Avatar
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    thanks brian, very cool

    neat stuff darrel...

  7. #87
    Steve's Aircraft (Brian)'s Avatar
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    If you guys want to see some amazing wood work check this site out....

    http://www.joeharmondesign.com/

    Brian.

  8. #88
    www.SkupTech.com mike mcs repair's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve's Aircraft (Brian)
    If you guys want to see some amazing wood work check this site out....

    http://www.joeharmondesign.com/

    Brian.
    ok,
    now I want to make a loom....

  9. #89

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    Ok I had never seen one of these before this thread and your post. Within 24 hours it had moved it to the front of the must have list in my brain. Upfitting the police bikes as I do, has turned into an full time job and each bike has about 200 crimp wire connections. I have permanently creased the inside of my right hand in the last 2 years from squeezing the crimping pliers several thousand times (I had to re-write that last several times trying to remove the joke potential. Can't seem to do it.. I digress) . Soooo. I saw this machine and decided to get one and modify it to crimp wires. There are purpose built power crimp machines but I have decided as usual to have a more universal machine that I can use in many other ways. I am envisioning "shrinker" heads for aluminum, 90* angle die for small brackets, etc. Well I spent a little more $ and got a "new" surplus one off ebay and could not be happier with it. The guy has more of them but he keeps going up in price. Mine was 400 I think. The first crimping dies I have modified work beyound expectation. Using a "flattening die it removes/erases bends from sheet aluminum, I also scored an air powered wire stripper and that will really help with production of the next 17 bike/wire harness backlog I have. Thanks Dave


    Quote Originally Posted by Darrel Starr
    Here is one of my favorite tools. It is a Chicago Pneumatic CP0351 - Alligator Jaw Rivet Squeezer with a 9.125 inch reach. Almost all of the riveting in the interior, boot cowl, etc for our Super Cub was made with this tool. Once the rivet sets are shimmed to create the correct squeeze, you can rivet all day long and each squeeze turns out perfectly. These riveters can be bought new for about $2000 BUT they have been around for decades and are available on eBay, Oshkosh Flymarket and other places in rebuildable condition for about $300 to $400. Rebuild seal kits are available. Mine required disassembly and rebuilding (beware of the loose needle bearings that might end up on the floor). The hard steel jaws on mine were a little rusty so I cleaned them up and reblued them. I had an old engine stand so I used it as the base and welded up some rectangular tubes to mount the squeezer. The pedal is one of those $10 Go Cart brake pedals that are widely available. All the other parts in the push cable system were custom made. The bracket holding the squeezer in place is a 4 inch exhaust pipe clamp from Fleet Farm with some shrink tubing around it.
    Besides using it for normal riveting, I created a tool to make the indentations required around the flat head Lion fasteners in the lower cowl. That tool set consists of an SM214 flat rivet set machined with a 0.250 hole in it. I pressed an MS20470AD-8-10 rivet (.250 dia, .625 long) into the SM214. The matching set is an SM200-47010 normally used for a .312 dia MS20470 (AN470) rivet. With this setup, I can create the indentations needed for the lower cowl fasteners as the test pieces show.
    Darrel












  10. #90
    Darrel Starr's Avatar
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    That is great, Dave. Please post your adaptations. Very interested. This is the great thing about the web site. One good thing leads to something better.
    Darrel

  11. #91
    Iflylower's Avatar
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    Here is one for the home builders....

    I made all my own leading edge skins for the wings, excepting the the last wingtip skin for each side. Those compound curved skin are not easy, and Univair charges $200 per.




    I used a vacuum press process I learned on Youtube. Look it up for clarification.

    Anyway, I made the skins out of .020 2024t3 and that is some springy material. They turned out great. I planned all the skins based on prints. I made them the correct length and width. (a little over on width can give you some play room. Trim later on the wing.)

    Get some length of 2" pvc, buy a cover for one end, and a coupler that fits your vacuum for the other. The tube length doesn't matter much. Take a section just smaller than your smallest skin width and drill 20-30 holes into it. You want air to be able to move. A roll or two of GOOD 3M duct tape. I had two kinds and the cheaper stuff would seal the plastic, but not hold the 2024 closed.

    Figure your leading edge point. Make a mark on the center of what you'd call the apex of the skin where it fits the wing leading edge. Tape that mark to the 2 inch pvc. Now, lay the trailing edge of both skins (upper n lower) to where they should meet together. NOTE: The top half should always be nearly couple inches longer than bottom. Do your own math like I did. I did this eight months ago.

    Tape the sides by the rear corner together as this does a better job of locking the upper and lower than a flat piece on the trailing edge. You're gonna tape that trailing edge too, but experience will show you that your tape will not hold the halves together without those "lock" pieces in place. 2024 wants desperately to stay straight. Honestly, this wasn't always easy, but it did turn out well. Start with the smallest skins first, as they are the easiest. The longest skin has the most bounce back and can be frustrating.

    Now tape plastic around the sides of the pvc tube and sides of the skins. You want NO air gaps between the inside of the skin and outside. Make it air tight, cause you're gonna vacuum it.

    Once you're sealed, turn on the vacuum and watch it all squeeze in on itself. The skin will form right around the 2" pvc and the rest of the skin will lay flat, upper and lower together. I flatten it, shut off the vacuum to release, turn it on and repeat a couple times to lock that form in.

    After you've done it, untape. You should have a nice "L" shaped curved leading edge skin. You're ready for the brake to put spar bends and fit to wing.

    Please reference Youtube for videos to clarify the procedure. You can tell this is a "clean" process as I did it in my kitchen area in February.

    Somewhere, I have better pics of the process, but can't find them. Notice a couple finished skins next to the vacuum.

    Enjoy! This is a money saver for the homebuilder.

  12. #92
    Bugs66's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iflylower
    Here is one for the home builders....

    I made all my own leading edge skins for the wings...

  13. #93
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    I bet Linsay loved that on the hardwood floor.
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers

  14. #94
    Iflylower's Avatar
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    That'll be our secret. Actually, it was a cold day, a clean job, and didn't want to sit on the garage or hanger floor with that long pvc tube.

    I wished I had better and different pics, but I did want to contribute to the jig/tool forum! Wished I had all these when I started two years ago.

  15. #95
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Well you are gonna have to build a 4 place now.
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers

  16. #96
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    A 3' long hole finder. Being used here to locate blind holes for floorboard screws.

    "Fast is fine, but accuracy is everything." Wyatt Earp

  17. #97
    Iflylower's Avatar
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    cool spinner2. Homemade, I'm gonna guess?

    A guy that does a lot of sheet metal around here has shown me how to use some plexiglass strips to copy blind holes and transfer to the new part. Also works great!

  18. #98
    spinner2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iflylower
    cool spinner2. Homemade, I'm gonna guess?
    Partially shop made. I used a purchased hole finder for -3 screws and cut it apart where it was spot welded together. I then re-welded those two pieces onto 3 feet long pieces of 1" wide 1/8" thick steel. One of the 3' pieces has an offset in it to allow a gap between the two so it will easily slide over the floorboards. The duct tape is just to prevent scratching of finished parts. It worked very well.
    "Fast is fine, but accuracy is everything." Wyatt Earp

  19. #99
    www.SkupTech.com mike mcs repair's Avatar
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    was just in Reeve AirMotive here in anch (907)272-8522 and saw this sitting on counter...



    made by a guy here on birchwood field..
    for timing TCM engines just like you do on a Lycoming... slip this over the proper 2 prop nuts and then sight down top of case just like you do on a lycoming... for those engines with not marks on pulley.....or to verify the pulley marking(s)...

    I just thought that was neat...

    looks so much faster than that darn sticky wirlly pointer timing thing!!!

  20. #100
    moneyburner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike mcs repair
    Quote Originally Posted by cubflier
    Mike - Keep um comin. For a Mike you sure know how to Jerry rig.

    Jerry
    running out of pictures for now...

    hopefully you others will add you stuff to this thread!!
    Mike, are you sure you're not a luthier?
    A luthier is someone who builds jigs, presumably to build guitars, but really the goal is to impress other luthiers. Naturally, I have dozens of ingenious guitar-making jigs myself, in case anyone would like to be impressed.



    You are a freaking genius - I LOVE this stuff!
    Quidquid Latine dictum sit, altum videtur

  21. #101
    www.SkupTech.com mike mcs repair's Avatar
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    practice for making mic jack pockets... .......

    not bad results for first prototype form... works easier than expected...
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uiar-4Wp7q0





    [/quote]

  22. #102

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    Looks good enough and pretty good, regardless of first prototype or not.
    Back In Alaska

  23. #103

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    1980 degrees of bends in a 20' stick of 5/8 .049 Stainless tube. It took about an hour of CAD to get the layout for the jig. I had to modify the bender to attach it to the jig.


    [/img]

    This is the jig.




  24. #104
    gpepperd's Avatar
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    tools, jigs, fixtures, and other neat stuff

    Don, That is very ingenious but what is it for? Sorry for my ignorance. Thas is a great thread. Greg
    Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of
    that comes from bad judgment. will rodgers

    "Anyone who would give up liberty for safety deserves neither" Ben Franklin

  25. #105
    moneyburner's Avatar
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    Re: tools, jigs, fixtures, and other neat stuff

    Quote Originally Posted by gpepperd
    Don, That is very ingenious but what is it for? Sorry for my ignorance. Thas is a great thread. Greg
    I'm going to guess it's for making beer.
    Quidquid Latine dictum sit, altum videtur

  26. #106

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    I have to add four more twenty footers to complete this coil. Ill post my progress and tell you what it is for when I’m done.

  27. #107

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    Great Thread

  28. #108
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    I needed to dimple some rivet holes but the formed leg in the part was too tall to allow my rivet squeezer to work. So I made a couple of adaptors to accept dimple dies for a Whitney hand punch. Plenty of clearance now over the angle.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    "Fast is fine, but accuracy is everything." Wyatt Earp

  29. #109
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Nice, I like that idea.
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers

  30. #110
    www.SkupTech.com mike mcs repair's Avatar
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    to sharpen tip of a double fluted unibit,

    set drill doctor to where I marked 'U' and sharpen as normal, make sure bit is gripped tight in chuck!!!!!!!! ops

    (will sorta work for a single flute one, but you end up grind second half by hand.. )

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  31. #111
    www.SkupTech.com mike mcs repair's Avatar
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    VERY COOL!.. just testing the inline video thing.... oh i shall so (ab)use this


    Quote Originally Posted by mike mcs repair View Post
    practice for making mic jack pockets... .......

    not bad results for first prototype form... works easier than expected...
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uiar-4Wp7q0





    [/QUOTE]

  32. #112
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    That is awesome Mike.
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers

  33. #113

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    Another Bungee Tool

    I used a press with self made adapters. Important things are the steel tube (lose fit) on top of the hydrasorb and a wood bar for centering on the lower side to avoid the whole thing shooting out when one side of the bungee slides on. When the press is down I use a hammer to slide the adapters about a half inch inwards, so the ears on the hydrasorb are below the adapers with the bungee cords. Then I slide out the two steel rods to let the cords move on the gear (see second picture). I was trying to make a tool which I found in the forum here but couldn´t make it work with the hydrasorbs - so I came up with this.






  34. #114
    Bushwhacker Air's Avatar
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    That bungee rig will take the thrill out of that job!! Great idea!

  35. #115
    www.SkupTech.com mike mcs repair's Avatar
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    now that we can do inline video

    again,
    the super simple and quick pulley alignment tool..


  36. #116
    www.SkupTech.com mike mcs repair's Avatar
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    well, not airplane.. but a cool wheel winch!

    but too cool!! so simple..

    looks like they need some help getting this to market, someone should step up, I bet it will do well

    watch the WHOLE thing, gets amazing twords end.... so simple!



    http://wheelwinch.tumblr.com/

    then I see this one too for cars


  37. #117
    Darrel Starr's Avatar
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    Got tired of wrestling the family snowblowers ( our son and we own three of the 300 lb beasts) onto our small tilt trailer. So I bought an electric winch at Northern Tool and an 18ah battery from Batteries Plus. Lag screwed to the front of the old trailer, it pulled the snowblower up the tilted bed just fine. I don't know how many blowers could be pulled up before the battery would have to be recharged -- I moved two of them and the battery was still strong. I'll just fully charge it again before the next use.
    Darrel
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  38. #118
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    Make your own Fabric Covering Rib-stitch needles

    This is probably known by many....except for those who know. After reviewing the price of custom covering needles, Jason Gerard told me to make my own. So, I did, and made a few for others too. Covering needles are all over the map, some $15-20 and more. A basic assortment $50 at Spruce. I made 10 of them for myself and others for $2.

    I'll edit and post a picture later.

    Go to a welding supply store and purchase a few 36" sticks of 1/8" Stainless welding filler rod. Cut to desired length. 15" - 18" for through the wing. Eight'ish inches for tail and controls. Make a curved needle for wrapping under a rib. Experiment with bending so they'll hook under the next hole.

    Pound one end flat on a vice to make a drillable surface. Punch and drill two small holes (1/16+or-). I have two needles that have one hole. And, I don't like them as well. Grind the top of that flat or a slight V to get traction for pushing knots into the fabric. On the opposite end, grind a nice point, then slightly round/dull it so it doesn't catch on the fabric.

    Rinse - Repeat.

    Good luck.

  39. #119
    Iflylower's Avatar
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    Trick for getting those tight half rib stitches that don't go through the wing...

    Just learned this from DW. I was so impressed, I threatened to move him to speed dial for build questions. I was shaking my head trying to figure out how to rib stitch the top of the wing that's over the flap cove. If you can't stitch through, it's a 6.5 inch gap and that's unacceptable. I couldn't curve a needle to go through a hole, under a rib, and back out a hole 1 inch away. DW told me the trick to tying a half rib knot. Go through the hole into the wing. Route the needle forward to the next hole, same side (3" or whatever the spacing.) Pull out your cord. Go down through the same hole and guide back under the rib and out the opposite hole from your initial start. Pull out the needle and all the cord should flow back into the wing and out that final hole. Works great. I'm done rib stitching.

  40. #120
    spinner2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iflylower View Post
    Trick for getting those tight half rib stitches that don't go through the wing...

    Just learned this from DW. I was so impressed, I threatened to move him to speed dial for build questions. I was shaking my head trying to figure out how to rib stitch the top of the wing that's over the flap cove. If you can't stitch through, it's a 6.5 inch gap and that's unacceptable. I couldn't curve a needle to go through a hole, under a rib, and back out a hole 1 inch away. DW told me the trick to tying a half rib knot. Go through the hole into the wing. Route the needle forward to the next hole, same side (3" or whatever the spacing.) Pull out your cord. Go down through the same hole and guide back under the rib and out the opposite hole from your initial start. Pull out the needle and all the cord should flow back into the wing and out that final hole. Works great. I'm done rib stitching.
    I glue on the top sheet, shrink it with the 250º iron and then stitch these before putting the bottom sheet on. Then shrink the bottom sheet and back to the top at 350º.
    "Fast is fine, but accuracy is everything." Wyatt Earp

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