Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 41 to 80 of 101

Thread: Cessna 180

  1. #41

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    290
    Post Thanks / Like
    Stewart,

    No, I don't have any scientific evidence, one way or the other, that engine monitors, do or do not, improve safety. However, the anecdotal evidence is rather overwhelming that they do help find little problems before they turn into big ones. Now what one does with this information is entirely up to them.

    Does your oil temperature/pressure gauge enhance safety?

    Many would think finding a problem early is a good thing and in turn would enhance safety, save money, apparently you don't?

    Well, You can change your cylinders when they drop below 79 if you like, it's your airplane. For me, I'll continue to save my money and spend it only when it's necessary, on a real problem, not imagined ones.

  2. #42
    StewartB
    Guest
    Skip,

    I'll wait for that evidence. Meanwhile, as my original post said, the two major issues with 0-470s will continue to happen and will, with or without your instrument, require repair. As for my desire to repair cylinders that may be deemed "legal"? Guilty as charged. I'll spend the money to repair them. With respect to my engines I will not be satisfied with minimum standards of compliance. The top of the scale is what I demand. If you believe there is no difference? Like I said, run yours as you wish. But let me ask you, if you need a replacement cylinder, would you consider a 50psi cylinder of equal value to a 79psi cylinder? If you bought a reman engine and all cylinders showed 50psi after 100 hours would you be satisfied? Be honest.

    Some may think I'm opposed to bar graphs. Nothing could be further from the truth. I just recognize their flaws and limitations. I do not think those who don't incorporate them into their panels are reckless or irresponsible. For what it's worth I have a JPI EDM-700 sitting at Merrill Field Instruments with my name on it. It will accompany three Aerospace Logic instruments into my 180's new panel and will eliminate all the stock gauges on the right side. Why the JPI? Because I can replace my current 7 instruments with 4 new ones that are approved as primary replacements. I'll have TC required info plus additional desired info, all displayed in a pleasing and consistent way.

    SB

  3. #43

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    290
    Post Thanks / Like
    Stewart,


    Glad to hear it, now we can get started on this "compression" thing.

  4. #44

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    290
    Post Thanks / Like
    Stewart,

    [/quote] As for my desire to repair cylinders that may be deemed "legal"? Guilty as charged. I'll spend the money to repair them. With respect to my engines I will not be satisfied with minimum standards of compliance. The top of the scale is what I demand. If you believe there is no difference? Like I said, run yours as you wish. But let me ask you, if you need a replacement cylinder, would you consider a 50psi cylinder of equal value to a 79psi cylinder? If you bought a reman engine and all cylinders showed 50psi after 100 hours would you be satisfied? Be honest. [quote]

    Your good at asking questions, when are you going to start answering some?

    As for this latest question, of course I'd want the higher compression cylinder but that isn't the point and you know it.

    Once you own the cylinder and it's on the engine, when does it become a safety/performance issue?

    If you demand "Top of the Scale" as you say you do, they when do you pull the plug on a cylinder? "Top of the scale" suggest nothing less than 80/80 will do for you. That's the top of the scale, 80, maybe it's a floating scale for you?

    Since you seem to know more about the subject than TCM and why they came out with the newer limits in the SB03-3, please enlighten us and tell us all what that limit should now be and why?

  5. #45
    StewartB
    Guest
    My experience the day I pulled off an airworthy 0-470 with compressions in the low 60s and replaced it with a new engine with compression near perfect? There was absolutely no question that the new engine spanked the old one in every power-related parameter. Absolutely no question. And yet the new engine was expected to improve on power as the bearings and cylinders ran in.

    When I had one cylinder drop into the low 60s a couple of years ago the issue was announced to me by a new vibration and reduced cruise speeds. Since my TO weights are always changing I never really noticed TO performance degradation. Once that cylinder was repaired the vibration ceased and normal cruise speeds returned. In fact I've had that experience twice with my current engine. Neither cylinder was required to be repaired using the new TCM standards. I don't regret doing so.

    On what my personal limits are? It depends on how we got there. I become uncomfortable with compressions in a single cylinder deviating from the rest. That's what I've experienced. If I have 5 in the 75-76-77 range and one in the mid or low-60s? It's coming off. See the pirep on single cylinder repairs above.

    Does that help explain my attitude? What questions have I failed to answer?

    Stewart

  6. #46

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    greenville, ms
    Posts
    195
    Post Thanks / Like

    cessna 180

    mvivion, an old pilot friend of mine always rinsed his engines with diesel fuel until they ran clear after his oil changes, everything from cubs to 414's, i have been doing the same for 12 years

  7. #47

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    290
    Post Thanks / Like
    Stewart,

    I've heard that story before and I believe, you believe that. The science, and there is a study and data on this, suggest otherwise. I can't point you directly to the studies finding, however, IIRC, Mike Busch and the GAMI guys have talked about and I trust their opinion and am going with it as fact. If you have any data to the contrary, I'd like to see it.


    I've replaced cylinders, one at time, two at a time, even topped an 0300 with all new cylinder and didn't see one bit of improvement. None, zero. I'd say what you experienced was a "placebo" effect. I am sure you feel otherwise but, to use an old APS quote, "the data doesn't lie".

    You said TCM changed the standard because they couldn't meet the old one anymore. Do you have proof of this or is that just your opinion?

  8. #48
    StewartB
    Guest
    Sorry Skip, but this topic has run it's course. I participated to help answer the original question. I'm done.

    SB

  9. #49
    Scouter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Exeter Maine
    Posts
    1,911
    Post Thanks / Like
    And for me both of your 0-470 insights have been helpful, since you both have "been there, done that" with TCM, and I have not.

    Jim

  10. #50
    jaypratt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    373
    Post Thanks / Like

    0-470

    Thanks for a good discusion. Good timing for me.
    I found a 1976 180J, its been sitting since 2003. 1080 TT, no mods, one owner, same hanger, never left out side over night. NDH. Still looks new.

    I flew this plane home and did about 8 flights and 8 hours. Did a compresion ck, it had 20/80, 60/80, 72/80, 72/80, 74/80, 70/80, compression. I took the two low ones off and had them reconditioned. Just put the engine back together this evening.
    I hope to fly this airplane some before having to take the other four cylnders off. Haven't started it yet. maby tomorrow.
    Jay Pratt
    Paul Revere, Borrowed Horse, & Shooter

  11. #51

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    290
    Post Thanks / Like
    OKMike,

    Quote Originally Posted by okmike
    What about low compression readings on the later model O-470-U?
    I was told the steel ring lands don't seal well under 80# pressure during compression tests but seal OK under combustion pressure.
    Is this true?
    This is the response I recieved from Bob Moseley. Bob worked for TCM for some 35 years and was their SE Regional head honcho when he retired. He and his wife now run thier own engine and cylinder shop in Fulton, MO. Skytek I believe.

    "Actually, TCM introduced the steel insert in the top compression ring land only due to the fact that wear issues in that area caused low compression readings and the steel insert virtually eliminated those issues. Compression readings are mainly used as a tool to determine engine health, not airworthiness in itself. Piston skirt scuffing is usually caused by overheating if severe, and light scuffing will be noted on the thrust side of the piston which is not a cause of concern. TCM has leaned to less and less choke during manufacturing, and, the issue of choke compatibility of inserted pistons has been a subject of possible concern in years past. However, I can tell you with absolute confidence that .008 taper, (not choke) with an inserted piston works very well with an oversize set of rings fitted to min specs. Taper started about 4" from the bottom of the cylinder. I have also had good luck with compression staying higher longer. With that being said and knowing that compressions have to be understood of what they mean, if the engine runs up to higher times, and many of the TCM's do, it also works."

    mose

  12. #52

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    290
    Post Thanks / Like
    OKMike,

    Quote Originally Posted by okmike
    What about low compression readings on the later model O-470-U?
    I was told the steel ring lands don't seal well under 80# pressure during compression tests but seal OK under combustion pressure.
    Is this true?
    This is the response I recieved from Bob Moseley. Bob worked for TCM for some 35 years and was their SE Regional head honcho when he retired. He and his wife now run thier own engine and cylinder shop in Fulton, MO. Skytek I believe.

    "Actually, TCM introduced the steel insert in the top compression ring land only due to the fact that wear issues in that area caused low compression readings and the steel insert virtually eliminated those issues. Compression readings are mainly used as a tool to determine engine health, not airworthiness in itself. Piston skirt scuffing is usually caused by overheating if severe, and light scuffing will be noted on the thrust side of the piston which is not a cause of concern. TCM has leaned to less and less choke during manufacturing, and, the issue of choke compatibility of inserted pistons has been a subject of possible concern in years past. However, I can tell you with absolute confidence that .008 taper, (not choke) with an inserted piston works very well with an oversize set of rings fitted to min specs. Taper started about 4" from the bottom of the cylinder. I have also had good luck with compression staying higher longer. With that being said and knowing that compressions have to be understood of what they mean, if the engine runs up to higher times, and many of the TCM's do, it also works."

    mose

  13. #53

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    290
    Post Thanks / Like
    Hey Jay

    Just curious, did you pull all the tappets/lifters?

    Find any spalling from sitting for that long?

  14. #54
    okmike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Pryor, OK
    Posts
    805
    Post Thanks / Like
    Thanks for the great information
    I bought a 79 182 with 1500TT, it has a O-470-U with 150 hrs SMOH w/new Millinimum steel cylinders, the MOH was in 2003 and the plane was only flown 115 hrs SMOH when I got it in late Oct, 2009. I've put 40+ hrs on it and the compression hasn't changed much and is in the low 60's with one at 58 (standard test without master oriifice tool). The engine uses no oil, puts no oil on the belly and has plenty of power. Custom AreoMotive in Tulsa did the MOH and they say it's typical of the U series with the steel ring lands and to just fly it and check it per the TCM S.B.

    If I thought someting was wrong I'd have it re-ringed but it runs great and uses no oil so I think I'll just watch it. I've got a trade working with it for a 180 with the O-470-U, and don't know the compression readings on it yet.

    Any advice is appreciated concerning the later model O-470-U high compression low RPM engine.

    Mike

  15. #55
    180Marty's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Paullina, Ia
    Posts
    2,025
    Post Thanks / Like
    Any advice is appreciated concerning the later model O-470-U high compression low RPM engine.
    Texas Skyways winds it up 200 rpm and it puts out 250 hp.

  16. #56
    jaypratt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    373
    Post Thanks / Like

    only 2

    Could not look at all lifters. Only removed two cylnders.
    Had em fixed up and put them back on.
    The inside of the engine looks good, from what we can see looking in through #1 qnd #4.
    If ? doing this dosent fix it up I will pull the other four. Since this 180 is new to me ,,, I am willing to do the work twice ,,, just to see if I can save a little money. Its only sweat equity.
    I had a quart of oil blowing out and coating the belly after each hour of flight.

    #1 20/80 had a leaking exhaust valve. #4 60/80 was blowing past the rings.
    Jay Pratt
    Paul Revere, Borrowed Horse, & Shooter

  17. #57

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Surfside SPB-Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    257
    Post Thanks / Like

    180

    My C185 - 520D with over 1500 hours and never touched a millenium cylinder yet [compressions are all in the 70's] carrying heavy loads on floats and doing float training, not a easy life. My 54- C180 - 470-U has over 800 hours on milleniums [ compressions low 60's] float training and solo rentals - great engine with 90" 2 blade mac prop, my C172 - 180hp lyc - ECI's, a few stuck exhaust guides, ream them out and good to go. [compressions 70's] over 2000 hours in 4 years all float training and solo rentals, thousands of take-offs and landings. Fly the heck out of them, sitting is the worst thing!

  18. #58

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    290
    Post Thanks / Like
    FWIW, if anyones is interested here is some more information(re: opinion)
    on static compression.

    http://www.avweb.com/news/savvyaviat..._197497-1.html


    And an index of all of Mike Busch's columns

    http://www.avweb.com/news/savvyaviator/list.html

    Another that is very useful and informative from John Deakins

    http://www.avweb.com/news/pelican/182155-1.html

  19. #59

    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Posts
    0
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: 180

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Schanche
    Fly the heck out of them, sitting is the worst thing!
    Ditto. Looking through the logs on my plane every engine went to tbo and most without pulling a cylinder. The vast majority of the time on my plane was .7 hour trips to the guy's favorite fishing spot every other day.

    "top of the green, all day every day" and "cool cylinders and plenty of cool, clean oil."

    The only engine that had cylinder problems and needed a top was when it was not flown weekly.

  20. #60

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Gillam Manitoba
    Posts
    114
    Post Thanks / Like
    I know an engine that sits will get condensation and is likely to start corroding but what would you suggest for an airplane that sits from fall to spring over the winter? When it's on floats and your waiting for spring what's the best thing to do for your engine?

    thanks

  21. #61
    captainron55746's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Hibbing, Minnesota
    Posts
    118
    Post Thanks / Like
    If I remember right, the manufacturers recommend pickling the engine anytime it is going to sit for 30 days or more. There is a pickling procedure available on how to do it. I don't know the specifics and I have never done it and my plane has sat for a few months on end. I never intend for that to happen but sometimes that is just the way it goes. If you knew ahead of time it would be a different thing altogether, like the guys who put up their plane for the winter and don't take the floats off. They know they aren't going to use it. I wonder how many people really do the pickling thing and what their results are and how they feel about if that is a worthy procedure.
    Captain Ron

  22. #62

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Surfside SPB-Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    257
    Post Thanks / Like

    180

    Jason - use camgaurd! change oil, put camgaurd in , run engine for 1 minute, put it away and don,t turn the prop. You can pull the plugs and put storage plugs in also if you wish. This was recomended to me by a good engine builder in MN. He has tested his 550 powered 185 for many years with little flying, stored winters and most summers also with very little flying and no corrosion yet. Also we should be comming through Gillam this summer again up to the arctic, wanna join us?

  23. #63

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Gillam Manitoba
    Posts
    114
    Post Thanks / Like
    Brian, i haven't used camguard but regularily use AVblend which i believe to simular camguard. I would love to take in the arctic trip with you guys. What are the dates that your going this year?

    Jason

  24. #64
    mvivion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Bozeman,MT
    Posts
    10,438
    Post Thanks / Like
    Jason,

    AvBlend is NOT the same or even similar to CamGuard. CamGuard is the only additive that's approved for use in Lycoming engines by the manufacturer.

    This stuff is not snake oil, it's the real deal. MMO, AvBlend, etc are not approved by the engine manufacturers (which doesn't mean they're not legal--just means the engine manufacturers haven't agreed that they do anything productive in their engines).

    I've used CamGuard since the stuff came out, and if you read up on it, I think you'll find that it is the only one of these additives that is really thoroughly tested and proven to work. That is by other than subjective evaluations. The fellow who developed the stuff was a lubricant engineer for Exxon I believe, so he knows of which he speaks.

    See: http://www.aslcamguard.com/

    If I were going to park an engine over winter, however, I'd still go through the engine manufacturer's recommendation for pickling the engine.

    The down side to NOT doing so could be corrosion in your engine, and shortened engine life.

    MTV

  25. #65
    CubDriver218's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    626
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by jason crozier
    Brian, I would love to take in the arctic trip with you guys. What are the dates that your going this year?

    Jason
    Brian, I heard Florida was a good time. Kirk said he could feel the rocket kind of buffet the airplane when it launched. What is this Arctic Trip all about? You guys flying up to the Hudson Bay? I've always wanted to make my way that far North, but figured in summer on floats would be the time.
    Fast or slow, always low, freedom of flight soothes the soul.

  26. #66

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    290
    Post Thanks / Like
    OKMike


    Quote Originally Posted by okmike

    Also can someone tell me how does the differential pressure tester with the Master Orifice Tool discussed in the S.B. work? How is it different?

    Bob Moseley just got back to me on the Master Orifice tool question.


    "The "Master orifice" is related to how it is manufactured, along with how big the hole is. Approach angle to the hole is 60 degrees, hole size is .040 and exhaust angle is 60 degrees. Hole depth is I think from memory is 1/2". All these specs are from memory. What it does is take all compression gauges in use in all shops and calibrates them so they read a minimum allowable static compression check to be airworthy.

    mose"

  27. #67

    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    18
    Post Thanks / Like
    well, I haven't read the rest of the posts, so excuse me for reposting. but I have had almost all of my engines go untill TBO. Keeping the CHT below 400 is important as well as flying the plane as often as possible. More importantly though, you should pull the power back 1" every to 5 minutes approx at a time when approaching your landing area and use your cowl flaps to aid in slowing down engine cooling when its cold out. It will say in the manual how many degrees per minute the engine should cool, i can't remember exactly, but the way i approach my landing area give alot of room for error. Letting the engine shock cool is the biggest reason you will lower your tbo, because of different metals cooling too quick. on top of that, as soon as you break ground/water, get the power back ASAP, to climb power. and never run lean of peak, i always lean rich of peak, the little bit extra you burn in fuel will save you lots in overhauls. I also advise using 15w50 in the winter and w100 in the summer, especially if the plane will sit for a week at a time, as the w100 will stick to the cam lobes and other engine components better while it sits.

    this is just an opinion btw!

    Mr.J

  28. #68
    mvivion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Bozeman,MT
    Posts
    10,438
    Post Thanks / Like
    The Big Continental engines have their camshafts located below the crankshaft in the case. So, when stored for long periods of time, oil continues to drip onto the cam from the crank, making them (continentals) less susceptible to cam spalling when not flown regularly.

    As Brian noted, however, I'd still run camguard in those engines.

    The O-470 R model engine is about as reliable an engine as you'll find. It seems to be the preferred model of O-470, and the only one I have a lot of experience with. I think if you start off with a good one, and don't do anything really stupid, your chances of getting it to TBO are really good.

    Shock Cooling: Engine experts have been saying for years that shock cooling damage is probably more a factor of re-using cylinders for many runs, instead of replacing them, rather than how pilots operate an engine.

    There are LOTS of examples of flight training airplanes, which are generally operated regularly, and go from wide open throttle to throttle closed (or nearly so), with long glides pretty regularly. And, often in some pretty cold weather. Our engines all go to 500 over tbo, with this kind of abuse.

    Start with a good solid engine core, and don't re-use cylinders that have been run through a half dozen runs. The metal in those old cylinders starts to work harden and crystalize over time, and then crack.

    Now, PLEASE don't suggest that I'm saying you should abruptly reduce engine power, or otherwise abuse your engine, BUT, I think the engine manufacturers have now pretty well concluded that shock cooling doesn't apply to good engine components, and those old multi-run cylinders are probably going to crack anyway at some point.

    So, reduce power judiciously, but I sure wouldn't spend a LOT of time in loooonnngggg shallow descents while worrying about shock cooling, especially if that long slow descent will put you lower than comfortable over hostile terrain.

    MTV

  29. #69

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    greenville, ms
    Posts
    195
    Post Thanks / Like

    cessma 180

    I used to believe the old advice of 1" per five minutes untill i started using engine analyzers, not saying you should pull the power all at once from a high power setting but 4 or 5 inches at a time doesn't cause any shock cooling in my opinion, however i believe quickly going to full power rather than a gradual advance of the throttle (on a long runway) does a lot more damage than shock cooling, i also am a big fan of camguard

  30. #70

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    290
    Post Thanks / Like
    Keeping the CHT's below 400 is a good start, and if you don't let them get too hot to begin with, then they won't need to cool down very much after the fact. However, if you believe in "Shock Cooling" then you have to believe in "Shock Heating" too! Because they heat up a lot faster going to full throttle on take-off than they cool down pulling the power off.

    And it may seem counter-intuitive but it's been proven time and again on the test stand that reducing the power ASAP after take-off for the climb, is actually harder on the engine in the long run. When pulling the throttle back from wide open in the climb, your disengaging the Power Enrichment Valve (Economizer Valve) in the carburetor, who's sole purpose is to enrichen the mixture at high power and help control over heating. By reducing the throttle from "wide open", your effectively leaning the mixture without ever touching the red knob and prolonging the climb at slower speeds and/or reduced rates of climb, which in turn reduces the airflow needed for additional cooling. With an Engine monitor and Fuel Flow gauge you can easily see the results and verify the effects. It's true!

  31. #71

    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    18
    Post Thanks / Like
    i didnt think there was an economizer valve on the o-470?

  32. #72

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    290
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mr J,

    Quote Originally Posted by mr.jinks
    i didnt think there was an economizer valve on the o-470?

    There should be, at least there is on the ones I've seen. On the other hand, I haven't seen all of them either!


    Maybe this will help.

    http://home.comcast.net/~r123rs/Docu...b%20Manual.pdf

  33. #73
    Tim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Petersburgh, NY
    Posts
    3,469
    Post Thanks / Like
    Skip
    That explains alot, very interesting.

  34. #74

    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    18
    Post Thanks / Like
    huh... i guess you learn something new everyday, I haven't flown the 180 in a while, but i seem to recall climbing out at 23"/2400 after breaking water. I guess it'll be WOT and 2400 from now on. I will admit that I'm more familiar with the 185..

  35. #75

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    290
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mr J

    I haven't flown the 180 in a while, but i seem to recall climbing out at 23"/2400 after breaking water.

    That sounds about right and probably exactly what the "Book" called for. Then they went on to justify one of the reasons for the reduction is for "passenger comfort" or "cabin comfort".

    Today that wouldn't seem to have much merit but of course, that was written way back before anyone knew what a headset was, let alone actually used one. So I guess maybe there was some truth to it, way back when........



    I will admit that I'm more familiar with the 185.

    I Wish I could say that with a straight face.

  36. #76

    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    idaho falls, id
    Posts
    14
    Post Thanks / Like
    i have found with the carb'd 540 to leave my prop set so that it wont let things scream on takeoff in the back-country as to not rile the natives and other users...i find that reducing the throttle works good for my motor, with the edm running to monitor cht's and such. full rich is ok, but i have found i like to lean as i climb out...if we're in the middle fork, the flaps stay at 20 anyway...so 1/2 throttle and 65 for the speed works really good, leave the cowl flaps open 3/4...then it is just full flaps, speed to 55,12",1600 rpm, and land and stop in 450'...! gotta love those heavy old 182T's with the better cuff and the vg's...

  37. #77

    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    18
    Post Thanks / Like
    I have never seen or heard of a 540 in a 180? I have seen the 550 conversion in the odd 185 , but never a 540. The only 540 I have ever flown was in a Wilga 2000 but that was only a 20 minute check flight, I have seen a few in maules and the odd homebuilt though.

  38. #78

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Poplar Grove, IL
    Posts
    41
    Post Thanks / Like
    Many airplanes which were destined for the far north were equipped with an oil dilution system. The way the system was INTENDED to be used is that prior to shutdown, when the airplane is to be parked out in very cold weather, you'd use the dilution system to introduce gasoline into the oil system. This thinned the oil, and thus made cold starts easier.
    In a book written by Erich Hartmann (all-time high ace of ANY war...German) who got many of his kills on the Eastern front, he said the Luftwaffe was unable to operate in the cold Russian winter temperatures but the Russian planes could. A captured Russian pilot told them they used oil dilution to thin the oil so they would start the next time. And of course the gas evaporates as temperatures increase. The Germans adopted this technique.

    My 180 also came with an oil dilution valve and panel control, but I removed it when it stopped working. Plane was purchased and used in Maine by Folsom's Flying Service in Greenville.

  39. #79
    gbflyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    PAGS
    Posts
    708
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by mr.jinks
    I have never seen or heard of a 540 in a 180? I have seen the 550 conversion in the odd 185 , but never a 540. The only 540 I have ever flown was in a Wilga 2000 but that was only a 20 minute check flight, I have seen a few in maules and the odd homebuilt though.
    There was an old 180 done by a guy I think in Montana 20 some years ago on a one time field approval. Used a modified Cherokee Six cowl. It was an OK looking airplane, needed painted when I saw it. I spoke with the guy, he said it was a hell of a project, would never do it again.

    -540 is a great engine. The abuse they stand up to in these air taxi Cherokee 6's is amazing. The FAA allows them 2500 TBO now if they meet the maintenance and usage requirements.

    There is a TSIO-540 conversion out there for 185's and I believe there are a few of the '64 and newer 180's converted as well.

    gb

  40. #80
    StewartB
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by mr.jinks
    I have never seen or heard of a 540 in a 180? I have seen the 550 conversion in the odd 185 , but never a 540. The only 540 I have ever flown was in a Wilga 2000 but that was only a 20 minute check flight, I have seen a few in maules and the odd homebuilt though.
    The post you were responding to clearly said 182T. All T182s used lycoming 540s as far as I know. There was an STC to install a TSIO-540 @ 350 hp in 185s, but not many are around.

    SB

Similar Threads

  1. Cessna 180/185
    By Paul in forum Cafe Supercub
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 02-16-2004, 09:28 PM
  2. Used Cessna 180
    By R. JOHNSON in forum Cafe Supercub
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 12-23-2003, 11:56 AM

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •