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Thread: Husky??

  1. #41

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    The AOSS with extended Cub gear is a wonderful mod on the Husky. Sure, it slows you down over the stock gear, but I have yet to see a fixed pitch Cub that could hang with an AOSS Husky. You get more angle of attack with the AOSS/extended gear, and the regular AOSS benefit of reducing bouncing on rough terrain.

    A new wing Husky can work a significantly shorter area than an old wing Husky. Apples to apples landing distance goes from 325 feet to 200 feet with the new wing, because you can approach slower with the new wing.

    While a light Cub is a delight on a nice day, close to home, there is just no comparison to a new wing Husky on a bad day or going a distance. Tomorrow, we have a real winter like low influencing Bristol Bay and the Kenai Peninsula, with Homer's winds aloft forecast at 3,000 feet to be 71 knots out of the east. I flew out to Lake Clark and back today in the helicopter, ahead of the storm, and just landed home in Homer at 10:30 pm. Coming through Lake Clark Pass at 500 feet msl, trying to stay out of the 25 knot headwind even at 500 feet, there was some poor guy in a Cub at about 700 feet literally getting the stuffing knocked out of him. I was about 40 knots faster than the Cub, and at first I thought he was circling in the pass. Turns out, it was his wings flailing back and forth. Life is too short to be flying through a long pass at 50 or 60 mph over the ground, using rudder to right the plane because the ailerons are so poor on a Cub.

    As to Aviat's survival, I am amazed that Aviat continues to sell planes at a brisk clip -- even through this horrendous time. I suspect they will be around to provide parts for a long time, and in any event with the size of the fleet, if something happened to the company, no doubt others would emerge to provide parts.

  2. #42
    SJ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aktango58
    I would suspect that SJ's cub with that prop will keep up with the husky, or close, and still be a better short field.
    Not with 35" tires it won't The smallest tires I have ever had on it are 31" and it still would not keep up with my friends A1B by quite a margin. He has 26" goodyears. Once I get the plane back, I am going to put on some little tires and see what it will do just to satisfy my own curiosity (and that of others). I still don't think it will be as fast.

    I like all kinds of airplanes and I enjoy flying different planes. My personal observations about the "old wing" 180hp Husky I have mostly flown is that it is a quite capable airplane, but requires a more capable - or maybe I should say practiced - pilot to get close to the kind of landing and takeoff performance you can get out of a cub by just slapping it around. The angles for approach and takeoff are different and take some mental adjustments. The tail is quite a bit heavier than most cubs, and that requires a strategy change for short field takeoffs. I don't find the cockpit as comfortable as the cub, partially because I am tall in the torso and bang my head on things. I also find them to be very noisy inside. I have not flown one with at MT prop, this may help the noise and vibration. It otherwise seems to me to be a well built, easy to fly, airplane. If you never get more than 50 miles from home, you probably would be happier in a cub.

    I'd like to fly one of the new wing, hopped up Huskies and hopefully somebody will let me do that soon!

    sj
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    ------------------------------------------

  3. #43
    skywagon8a's Avatar
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    Steve--What do you see for an indicated airspeed in normal cruise flight? At what mp & rpm?
    N1PA

  4. #44
    SJ's Avatar
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    My ASI is goofed up, but with the 35" tires I get close to 100mph at lower levels. I was doing almost 10mph better on the 31's.

    sj
    "Often Mistaken, but Never in Doubt"
    ------------------------------------------

  5. #45
    skywagon8a's Avatar
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    What power setting?
    N1PA

  6. #46
    SJ's Avatar
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    On sorry, 24 squared, burn about 8.8
    "Often Mistaken, but Never in Doubt"
    ------------------------------------------

  7. #47

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    Steve,
    The next time I see you and am in the Husky it is yours to play with. I don't know if my 200 HP is any faster than a 180 HP, but it seems to be quicker off of the ground. As some of you know, Steve Pierce put the AOSS on my Husky.

    I originally bought the Husky for a couple of reasons over the PA-18. I wanted a new airplane, I was tired of dealing with issues on the older planes that I owned. I also live in Texas, it is a long way to anywhere fun to play with a plane of this type. Speed and range were originally a consideration. After I got the Husky I started finding fun places that weren't too far away, but they were too rough for my taste with the factory gear. I first added the 31" and SGS kit, this helped but was still not what I was looking for. And then I was at Nick Pierskalla's place on the Mulchatna, this is where Lonnie works, and Lonnie took me for a spin in his Super Cub with AOSS. Lonnie was very convincing that I needed to add this to my Husky. If I had it to do all over again, I might go a different way, not for sure. The major detriment for my use of the Husky is the empty weight. I would like it to be at least 100 pounds lighter if not more.

  8. #48
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    Interesting discussion. I'd pretty much second everything Dave and George have noted about the Husky.

    Christina: Here's something to consider--you are sort of correct regarding the published stall speeds of the airplanes, except that you're comparing apples to oranges.

    For example, the model A-1 Husky stall speed was published at 43 mph, maximum gross weight (1800 lbs) and power off. The Super Cub, with a max gross weight of 1750 lbs has a published power off stall speed of either 42 or 43 mph, depending on what year you're looking at. That is apples to apples. And, by the way, the A-1 Husky POH also advertises the Gross weight power ON stall speed as 37 mph.

    Now, the model A-1B Husky stall speed (power off and at 2000 pounds) is listed as 53 mph.

    Let's compare apples to apples, then: the Wipaire converted PA-18 published stall speed at max gross weight (2000 lbs) is given as either 52 or 53 mph, though I don't have a supplement here at the moment.

    The CC-18-180 Cub Crafters Top Cub stall speed, at 2300 pounds, is listed as 44 mph. That airplane is equipped with BLR VG kit, from the factory, though. It is a 180 hp, and empty weight of ours is 1307.

    In my experience, the Huskys pretty much stall at or below the speeds Aviat gives for them.

    As to ailerons, EVERY Husky has more effective ailerons than any STOCK Cub I've ever flown, that is a Cub with stock ailerons and wing length. IF you want really BAD ailerons, fly a Super Cub with extended wings sometime where they didn't extend and move the ailerons. I flew one of those for nearly two thousand hours, and pretty much gave up on ailerons in that cub. But, again, that doesn't represent the great mods that have been done to many Cubs either.

    The single biggest issue the Husky has is empty weight. That said, look at an uncovered Husky sometime, and you'll see where the weight comes from--structure. I've seen one that was screwed into the ground, killing the pilot, who wound up with the engine in his lap, but the rear seater didn't get hurt except a concussion from the deceleration.

    For many years, I flew Huskys and Cubs, often on the same undercarriages, same model skis, same tires, same floats. I generally found the Huskys to be 20 mph faster than a Cub, while buring 1+ gph LESS gas. These Cubs were all 160 hp cubs with Borer props.

    If you have to go out a ways, or stay airborne a long time, the Husky really shines.

    I never found the Husky wanting for STOL capability, and in fact, on floats, where performance on takeoff is really noticeable, there were a lot of places I took the Husky that I simply wouldn't take a Cub. At least not a 160 CUb.

    MTV
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  9. #49

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    And ummm, steve,what rpm/mp did you have to dial BACK to to keep me within "Civilian Formation" (same direction same day) when you so gratiously shepherded me out of the KMKC busy airspace? I kinda think cubscout's L-21B with 3" uncovered gear, 26" sissy Goodyears, and VG's runs ~ 77knots or whatever units you all like, 2400 rpm with a Sensenich 74-52 and a lousy pilot

    And or course, watching the semis passing on I-80 whilst en-route to Johnson Crick was a real teat last month

    Thanks. cubscout

  10. #50
    this would be a title NimpoCub's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvivion
    IF you want really BAD ailerons, fly a Super Cub with extended wings sometime where they didn't extend and move the ailerons.
    Damn! Thanks Mike That's exactly what I have, learned in, and all I've flown.
    Was talking to a guy (Aero. Engineer) @ the fly in this weekend 'bout that, and pretty much made up my mind to do that this winter (when I redo the wings). He also said it makes a noticeable difference to move the flaps right to the windows & move the wing root fairings fwd.

    What I understand is to move my EXISTING flaps inboard, and extend the ailerons all the way from them to the tips, izzat right? I'll look up all the existing threads 'bout a month before I start!

  11. #51
    mvivion's Avatar
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    Logan,

    Hey, that's the configuration of the first SC I flew, for eight years, and for much of that didn't know any better. Eventually (and not my choice) they rebuilt the wings during recover, and converted back to stock wings. Big difference.

    There are several ways to modify the aileron/flap assy, and many on here can give you the "hot setup", but the main idea is to increase size of aileron, and extend it out to the tip or close to it.

    I really don't understand this, cause several other Piper A/C, such as the Cherokee Six, have ailerons that end well inboard of the tips, and have okay (not great, but okay) aileron authority.

    But, bottom line is, extended wings with stock ailerons, flown in the mountains WILL teach you what the rudder is for....

    The "new wing" Husky has a redesigned, deeper chord aileron, which is aerodynamically (as opposed to mass) balanced, and has no "aerodynamic counterbalances".

    MTV

  12. #52
    this would be a title NimpoCub's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvivion
    Hey, that's the configuration of the first SC I flew, for eight years, and for much of that didn't know any better.
    That's because you didn't have the SCub.org guiding light.
    I'm a lucky noob to have all this adult supervision!!

  13. #53
    High Country's Avatar
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    I am a Cub guy. I looked at a Husky when I was shopping and I was impressed. Listening to some of the people on this site I thought the Husky would take forever to get off the ground and not be able to land on anything less than 600’. It was just the opposite, it’s a good airplane. It won’t quite do what a Cub will do if you are working real short and I do mean short (100’-300’) but beyond that it will. It will also do things that a Cub won’t.

    This debate will always rage on, but in my opinion the Husky is a great airplane with just a different personality than a Cub. Don’t take anyone elses word for it. Fly one for yourself and learn to fly it correctly before you make any snap decisions.

    Shane
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  14. #54

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    Question for MTV and other Husky Drivers

    Mike, Why do you think so many Husky's have stalled/spun killing or seriously injuring in the ADC program. I know plenty of cubs have fallen out of a turn also but for the number of Husky's flying it seems to be a problem. I think the Border Patrol also lost several also.
    Just asking not pointing any fingers. I would love to fly the new wing sometime, it has to be a big improvement.

    Dave

  15. #55

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    I have owned and flown both the original wing and new wing Husky's. No comparison, the new wing is a different airplane, much better for my taste.

  16. #56

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    Dave,

    I don't mean to steal Mike's opportunity here but I will give you what I found out with some research.

    I have never measured it, but just looking at the wing on the Husky it appears to have quite a bit more dihedral than a Cub. I feel this creates a "stronger" wing tip vortice on the Husky. Much like comparing a C-188 vortice to a C-180/185 vortice, the 188 has a heck of wing tip vortice compared to the 180/185 on an almost identical wing. Most of these accidents were circling a "target" and likely encountered a high angle of attack, dirty configuration wing tip vortice and stalled the nontrimmable horizontal stabilizer.

    According to a couple of the reports the aircraft were being flown "very aggressively." I am not sure what to make of that statement, other than maybe they were doing something they weren't suppose to.

    I have read that a gap seal on the horizontal stabilizer helps in this tail stall phenomenon, I have read and been told that installing VGs on the horizontal stabilizer only really helps the stall characteristics. I have not tried either of these "fixes" so I cannot personally comment on them.

    Just my $0.02.......
    Trace

  17. #57

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    As someone that is very regularly out flying with my wife, each in a Husky, I believe that the Husky has strong wake vortices for its size and weight aircraft. My wife and I allow separation on takeoffs, and offset in cruise with the trailing Husky flying a bit higher. Based on our experiences, it is easy for me to see how a Husky flying circular patterns over a coyote could encounter its own vortice at low altitude and airspeed and depart controlled flight with insufficient altitude to recover. I don't have enough experience with a Cub to compare its vortices to the Husky. Mike Vivion has described alternate methods to a standard circle in the Husky for years, and we have adopted these for observing game or other objects on the ground.

  18. #58

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    Where is "Flagold" Matt when you need him??

    John Scott

  19. #59
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    Dave,

    There were two Border Patrol Husky accidents, one fatal, one not, but badly injured. There were witnesses to both accidents, and the pilot survived the second. These involved some pretty extreme maneuvering at VERY low level, and apparent wake encounters. They were not circling repeatedly. Not long ago, Border Patrol lost a Cessna, with a fatality. They've also lost a few Cubs. You would have to look at the numbers of flight hours for each plane, vs the total hours, vs the number of accidents to actually say anything about that. I don't think anyone has done that. I sure haven't.

    Same goes for ADC. The fatal accident they suffered in a Husky not long ago was a classic circling stall/spin. This was a very different accident scenario than the BP accidents. I don't know how many Husky accidents they had, but the most recent ones were that one and one in SD that the pilot flew into the ground. There was another in training several years ago, and the relatively new pilot flew the plane into the ground on a gunning run. No loss of control in either of those. Target fixation happens sometimes.

    The point is, there is no consistency to the scenarios in these accidents, to the best of my knowledge, and I've looked at many of them pretty carefully.

    I have lost several good friends in Super Cub accidents, all high time very experienced pilots. Most were stall/spins. Why would a high time, very experienced Cub pilot lose control of an airplane? Particularly in very benign weather, as seems to often be the case. Answer that one, and we could make all these airplanes a lot safer.

    I've flown both Super Cubs and Huskys quite a lot in low level maneuvering flight and frankly, I don't see much difference, except that either can kill you. They fly different, and the new wing Husky flys very different than the old wing airplane does.

    I think Wayne Mackey has what could be a great tool to prevent this sort of accident in ANY of these airplanes. I looked at his plane this last week, and it is pretty interesting. He's done a lot of flight test with pretty remarkable results.

    I wouldn't be afraid to fly a Husky, a Cub, a Scout, a Cessna or a Maule in low level looking at stuff on the ground. None of them has really nasty characteristics, but as the saying goes, they're all so gentle that they can just barely kill you.....

    But, the powers that be have the ultimate answer: It's called a UAV.

    Boy would that suck. I'll take my chances with these beautiful little machines, thanks...

    MTV

  20. #60

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    husky

    About 2 months ago I talked to Roger Meggers over in Baker Mt. He has owned and flown huskys for several years, I have no idea how much time he has in one but he is a very experienced pilot in cubs and huskys. He has done his share of dusting and predator control also. He flat out stated that if you try to turn a husky like you can coyote turn a cub it will get you sooner or later.

    Just wondering if any of you guys agree with Roger's opinion.

    Dave

  21. #61
    Dave Calkins's Avatar
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    Re: husky

    Quote Originally Posted by ag-pilot
    About 2 months ago I talked to Roger Meggers over in Baker Mt. He has owned and flown huskys for several years, I have no idea how much time he has in one but he is a very experienced pilot in cubs and huskys. He has done his share of dusting and predator control also. He flat out stated that if you try to turn a husky like you can coyote turn a cub it will get you sooner or later.

    Just wondering if any of you guys agree with Roger's opinion.

    Dave
    Husky is fast. Accelerated stall?

  22. #62

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    Simple damn question, is this Supercub.org or Husky.org?

  23. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by High Country
    I am a Cub guy. I looked at a Husky when I was shopping and I was impressed. Listening to some of the people on this site I thought the Husky would take forever to get off the ground and not be able to land on anything less than 600’. It was just the opposite, it’s a good airplane. It won’t quite do what a Cub will do if you are working real short and I do mean short (100’-300’) but beyond that it will. It will also do things that a Cub won’t.

    This debate will always rage on, but in my opinion the Husky is a great airplane with just a different personality than a Cub. Don’t take anyone elses word for it. Fly one for yourself and learn to fly it correctly before you make any snap decisions.

    Shane
    You are probably referring to my statement for the 600'.

    No doubt that they can land much shorter, and takeoff real short.

    But lets be realistic, the 100-300' you mention for a cub is absolute performance, nothing goes wrong. Not many of us want to put a 250' strip for our home strip, seems many make 500+ if they can. It is called margin for the best, and in normal flying means a lot of comfort.

    So 600 would feel easy in a husky. There are those on this site that have trouble with 1500' in a cub

    Indabush,

    We could talk about rifles if you would like
    I don't know where you've been me lad, but I see you won first Prize!

  24. #64
    skywagon8a's Avatar
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    My only experience in a Husky was in an early model on floats while giving the owner his 10 hours dual for the insurance company. The only thing that stands out in my mind is that during slow speed during approaches it didn't feel comfortable without any flaps extended. Then when the flaps were extended to the first notch there was a noticeable increase in drag. Perhaps this has been improved in the newer wings? This uncomfortable feeling didn't exist in a Cub.
    N1PA

  25. #65

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    In over a thousand hours of Husky flying, I can't remember ever making a landing or maneuvering approach without some flaps. Take off with full flaps 90+ per cent of the time, climb maneuver with flaps 10 or 20, land with full flaps. Exceptions being very turbulent/gusty conditions where I land/takeoff with flaps 10 or 20, and glassy water where I use 10 or 20 degrees.

    I have taken off flaps 0 a handful of times, mostly by accident, which I discovered by wondering why the takeoff took longer. Given my lack of experience with flaps O approaches, it is hard to comment whether the plane feels good with 0 flaps. I have to ask, though, given how good the Husky feels with flaps, why would anyone with familiarity with the plane not use flaps in a Husky?

    The larger flaps of the new wing increase the descent rate with full flaps, making it much easier to get in over an obstacle. Where I frequently slipped with the old wing Husky, slipping is something I reserve for the odd situation in the new wing Husky. Burl gear increases the sink rate even further than stock Husky gear. In a simulated engine out at full flaps, I would retract some flaps in the new wing, because of the additional drag.

    As long as we are discussing flaps in the Husky, it might be worthwhile for folks to understand best technique for a max performance Husky takeoff on 31 Bushwheels and extended gear because we use the flaps different than I did in a Cub. Set flaps 30, stick all the way back, add full power, release the stick to a takeoff attitude, and let the plane fly off. You don't pull flaps, and since the plane flies off it is very predictable/repeatable.

  26. #66
    High Country's Avatar
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    George,

    How does the Husky react when you do pop the flaps?

    Shane

  27. #67

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    It reacts conventionally, but in our testing, we prefer to set full flaps, set the attitude, and let it fly off. If popping the flaps helps some minute increment, and we haven't been able to observe it, it is more than offset by being able to focus on directional control and tuning the takeoff attitude. We not only use full flaps at sea level but also at high DA in Idaho and Utah as well. In the Skywagon, by comparison, we routinely pull flaps on wheels and floats, so is isn't that we are opposed to that technique.

    As I have said before, we would be delighted to fly with or along other aircraft with our Husky on Burl gear to explore differences. Down here in Homer, we have a bunch of nearby strips around Kachemak Bay to play on.

  28. #68
    Widebody's Avatar
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    Re: husky

    Quote Originally Posted by ag-pilot
    About 2 months ago I talked to Roger Meggers over in Baker Mt. He has owned and flown huskys for several years, I have no idea how much time he has in one but he is a very experienced pilot in cubs and huskys. He has done his share of dusting and predator control also. He flat out stated that if you try to turn a husky like you can coyote turn a cub it will get you sooner or later.

    Just wondering if any of you guys agree with Roger's opinion.

    Dave
    100%.

    Brad

  29. #69

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    Please elaborate. Are you saying that a Cub stalls slower than a Husky, and that if you turn both at the same speed, there will be less margin above stall in the Husky? Or is there something else about the Husky's behavior -- and if so, can you describe it? Does Roger M have any time in a new wing Husky?

  30. #70
    Coyote Ugly's Avatar
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    Re: husky

    Quote Originally Posted by ag-pilot
    About 2 months ago I talked to Roger Meggers over in Baker Mt. He has owned and flown huskys for several years, I have no idea how much time he has in one but he is a very experienced pilot in cubs and huskys. He has done his share of dusting and predator control also. He flat out stated that if you try to turn a husky like you can coyote turn a cub it will get you sooner or later.

    Just wondering if any of you guys agree with Roger's opinion.

    Dave
    Yup............
    "Pops Dory"
    They used to say there are no old, bold pilots, Hell, looka here...

  31. #71

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    So my two buddies left Anchorage today in a Cub and Husky for a week long trip up north. Both on 31 inch Bushwheels. Left at the same time, and had a push along the way to their first destination of Fairbanks. The Husky flew at just 19/1900, stopped for two patterns at a strip along the way, landed ten minutes before the Cub, and burned 25 per cent, or five gallons less fuel.

  32. #72

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    husky V cub

    George, Not sure if its is all in the stall or if there is something else going on, like something with the wake. Last year there was a fatal ADC crash in Utah. The year before 2 very experienced pilots had bad crashes in South Dakota. S. Dakota suspended predator control with the Husky & it may still be grounded. I don't have near enough time in Husky's to say what is going on but with a Cub if your paying attention at all it will give you a loud and clear warning that you crowding it just a bit to much before paying off & if you let off it at all it gets happy again fast.
    On the wake thing, I have hit my own wake hundreds of times both hunting and spraying with a cub and its not that big of deal but, If you have 2 cubs both making passes on the same "object" you better not make parallel passes, Scary, !! Also when spraying tandem the second plane needs to be up wind of the first to stay out of the wake and spray drift.

    All Roger would say was if you try to fly, "turn" a husky like a cub it will bite you hard. He thinks it has something to do with the tail as I remember the conversation.

    Dave

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    delete

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  34. #74

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    I follow Husky crashes carefully, and I am just not aware of any number of Husky crashes that seem to result from a stall or stall/spin. Now the Cub fleet is obviously much larger than the Husky fleet, but it seems like stall and stall/spin crashes, often with fatal outcomes are not uncommon.

    With the exception of partial power stalls with VGs, I just haven't observed stall behavior in a Husky that would bite you. Mostly the plane just mushes. I have experienced encounters with wakes from a Husky that have gotten my full attention. If I was betting, I would place my bet that the problems encountered by the predator control Huskies you mention have resulted from low level encounters with their own wakes.

    I am not suggesting that a Cub is a bad plane because there are stall/spin accidents or that a Husky is a bad plane because its wake can bite. Despite being similar in many ways, as has been said many times, the Cub and Husky are different aircraft and need to be flown that way.

  35. #75
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    Well I have a Husky frame in the shop with some bent upper deck tubing. Asked at OSH about getting information, dimensions etc. to help facilitate repairs. I was given a phone number and contact person at Aviat so I contacted them. They called back that it is all proprietary information and I needed to buy a new fuselage for $18K. I love Piper Super Cubs.
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers

  36. #76

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    Steve,
    What does expiatory mean?
    Gary

  37. #77
    behindpropellers's Avatar
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    I think he got mixed up with proprietary.

    Tim

  38. #78
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Yep, I let spell check change it without looking at the whole word. Clifford has the fuselage fixed now without Aviat's help, though it would have saved some time.
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers

  39. #79
    mvivion's Avatar
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    The Super Cub pilot originated panic about Husky stall characteristics has been rampant and well publicized since the Border Patrol stuffed two Huskys into the desert back in the late eighties. If any of you ever discussed those accidents with the BP pilots who flew those missions, you probably wouldn't be surprised that they had a few accidents. They were flying Huskys to and probably beyond their limits, frankly, and doing things that they never did with the Cubs. Those are the ONLY two accidents of that type that I'm aware of, and those APPEARED to have involved a tail stall. The factory was unable to duplicate without using two airplanes at altitude (ie: without the assistance of ground effect-the BP was flying these VERY low). The factory managed to duplicate this effect using two airplanes, but the departure required a VERY dramatic pitch up and max power from the lead plane, and the trailer flew into this mass of mixed up prop wash. If you're more than 30 feet off the ground, and at normal loitering power settings, you just could not get there. These were very dramatic maneuvers those folks were doing.

    The ADC accident in Utah last year was a classic stall/spin-NOT a tail stall. The airplane was rotating at impact. This was NOT at all like the BP accidents. As George noted, Cubs stall spin pretty regularly....take a look at FlipFlop's "Lets Be Careful out there" thread for an example or two.

    The ADC Husky accident in SD was a pilot who was not real experienced in the Husky, and inexperienced in aerial hunting (I was told), but in any case, he flew it into the ground, under control trying to pull out of a shooting pass. The airplane did not stall, spin or tail stall. This again is not unheard of in ADC work, if you simply look at the accident statistics, and Cubs have been involved in that accident scenario as well.

    I've put about equal time in both Super Cubs and Huskys, almost exclusively doing low level maneuvering work. It is largely true that you don't fly a Husky like a Super Cub, but the differences arent' that huge either and it shouldn't take an experienced pilot long to figure it out.

    Now, on the other hand, I know of at least three Husky stall/spin accidents where someone survived. That is almost unheard of in Cubs. The reason Huskys are heavy is because of structure. That structure provides more protection to occupants in an accident.

    One of those accidents was a fed airplane in AK several years ago. Classic stall/spin during a mission that didn't require any maneuvering. Pilot had only a short introductory flight in the Husky, but was a high time air taxi guy. Lots of flight time in a Cherokee Six does not qualify one to work EITHER a Cub or Husky close and tight.

    I'd fly either airplane any day in low level maneuvering work. They're both great airplanes.

    Pilots kill pilots--airplanes don't, and there's nothing ugly at all about Husky flight characteristics that I've noted in several thousand hours in them.

    I have lost several good friends over the years in Super Cub stall/spin accidents, and these were almost exclusively very experienced pilots. Does that mean the Super Cub is a "dangerous" machine? Hell no. It just means that us pilots don't always meet the tests we're presented with as well as we might.

    I'm not casting stones at anyone....I've made mistakes in airplanes, I've had an accident, and I've been very lucky. I'm lucky to still be here, and well aware of that fact. Good airplanes of several models brought me home most days.

    MTV
    Thanks eviens thanked for this post

  40. #80
    WhiskeyMike's Avatar
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    Husky

    We got our first Husky. 1987 A-1. A Cub it ain't, but for a very reasonable price you can have 180HP, 50 gallons gas, really low total time, and 125-130 MPH or better cruise. Tail don't shake, everything works smooth as silk, no struts to replace. My PA-12/180 will out climb it any day, and has twice the aileron response, but the cost to replicate the airplane is $50,000 or more higher. Sometimes you have to settle for a compromise. My 160 Cub for sale on this site, is for sale because in Europe, 90MPH doesn't cut it. Landings cost $30 bucks a pop, and so LR tanks, a bit of speed/gas milage save you a heck of a lot of money and time. I note that the 83" MT prop is a must on the Husky as the short 76" Hartzell is no good on any plane. The MT is fabulous, and if I can find the spare $, I'll put a Sutton MT prop on my Cub and I'm sure that will solve the speed problem. Like I always say, I never flew a plane I didn't learn to like- Husky included. Used, it's a lotta bang for the buck! If you're worried about fixing it, don't wreck it in the first place, or take up stamp collecting instead.

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