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Thread: Best all around Rifle

  1. #1
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Best all around Rifle

    To all

    I am interested in purchasing a rifle. I am looking for the best general purpose all around rifle. Just as the Remington 870 is probably considered to be the best general purpose shotgun, there must be a similarly regarded rifle. Probably looking at 30-06 as that seems to be the gold standard. I know that in a perfect world we would all have lots of guns, one for every purpose but.....if you could have only one rifle what would it be?

    Thanks

    Bill

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    A combination gun! For instance a drilling 30/06 - 20/3" or 12/ 2 3/4 " good Schmidt and Bender scope and an insert barrel 22 l.r. I used to hunt with such outfit for decades and was prepared for everything !! Expensive, but one gun for the rest of the life
    The wandering raven

  3. #3
    SteveE's Avatar
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    Bill,,,, whats the intended purpose... Deer,, bear,,rabbits,,,?

    My perfect all around gun for deer and elk is my Rem 700 police tactical in 300 winchester mag.. I use 1 bullet for everything 165 gr Nosler ballistic tip... Good for long range or short... Not the perfect brush gun... Thats why I asked the question... Your intentions.

    Squirrels and such.... its way too much gun for them... a good 22 is fine.

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    Christina Young's Avatar
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    This is a ridiculous question. It's like asking "what is the best all around airplane"! Is it a Super Cub? A F-22? A C-130? A Gulfstream?



    SteveE, he asked for one gun, not two!

    How about a M-14 in .308 / 7.62 NATO?

  5. #5
    PerryB's Avatar
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    Personally I like the Remington 700. I've found them to deliver very good out-of-the-box accuracy. Of all the bolt action rifles I own, the only one thats NOT glass bedded is a 700 (7 MAG.). It shoots to good to mess with. Get a synthetic stock and a stainless action/barrel with a dull finish and you'll have a practical rifle that will last a lifetime.

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    Christina Young's Avatar
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    BTW, if you want a 30-06, why don't you take advantage of a good deal and buy one directly from the U.S. Government:

    http://www.thecmp.org/

    Select "M1 Garand" in the pane on the left side of the page under "Rifle Sales".

  7. #7
    gbflyer's Avatar
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    Evidently he is talking about a big game rifle or he wouldn't have referred to the .30-06.

    The .30-06 is an excellent choice for an all around big game caliber. There is no game animal on the N. American continent that it has not taken. It is without argument the most common choice, and there is a countless selection of both rifle and ammunition.

    Opinions vary on brands, and there is a rifle for every budget. The most accepted models are bolt action, but there are a couple of good quality semi-autos built by Browning and Benelli out there too. If you are thinking low budget, the Savage 110 series rifles are without a doubt an excellent value and the accuracy is unrivaled for a production factory bolt gun at any price. Winchester has once again resumed production of the Model 70, which is the American standard big game rifle. If you enjoy the challenge of a single - shot, the Thompson Center Encore series is also a fine piece, with the ability to quickly switch barrels to other calibers as well as shotgun and black powder, making them extremely versatile.

    Lots of used ones are available as well.

    There are many stainless steel models now stocked with synthetics, which are my personal favorite. Wood is fine, especially in dry climates. On the other end of the spectrum, there are various heirloom quality custom built models, both using factory actions as well as custom, and prices start around $3K. Kind of all in what you want.

    gb

  8. #8
    Ursa Major's Avatar
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    Bill,

    Sounds like you are leaning toward the 30-06. For an all around, do nearly everything, caliber it is a good choice. If you are looking for the genetic equivalent of the 870 shotgun then the Remington 700 is pretty close. I've had a bunch of them over the years in various calibers and configurations from stock to heavily customized. Compared to the Winchesters, Brownings, and Rugers, they seem to be consistently more accurate right out of the box. The others all have nice features, but its hard to beat the 700.

    I too enjoy the M-1 Garand, but it is limited in hunting potential by the type of ammo you should use for proper functioning of the gas system (it really prefers GI hardball) and the 8 round clip (many places limit the mag capacity to 5 rounds when hunting).

    There are a lot of good options out there. If I was to keep only one of my rifles (for hunting), it would probably be a Remington 700 in 30-06.
    Mike

  9. #9
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Wow, didn't take long to get flamed on that one.

    A little research on a couple of other websites seems to point to a Remington 700 or a Winchester 70. I guess I should have been a little more specific. This will be a hunting gun. Not varmint, not survival, not ultra light weight, not sniper, not a Rhino monster, not combination, not over 1,500 dollars, once again, .......something along the lines of what the Rem 870 is to the shotgun world. Does not have to be a 30-06, but that seemed to be a pretty popular all around caliber for medium up to fairly large game.

    Thank you for your inputs. What is your opinion TJ?

  10. #10
    SteveE's Avatar
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    Given that criteria,,, you cant go wrong with a Rem 700... generally the most accurate out of the box... Bring it to NH and I will do a trigger job on it. 30-06 would be fine.

  11. #11
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    I think Jack O 'Connor was on to something pretty good... just don't tell Elmer that I think Roy's idea of Jacks baby is even better...

    I am fortunate enough to have several guns, but 99.9% of the time I reach for my Wby .270. While being one of the least popular Weatherby cartridges it is arguably one of the best. Closely looking at ballistics you will see that no other cartridge shoots as flat as this.... Period! You can load it in everything from 90 - 180 grain bullets, although I find a 140 gr. Nosler balistic will drop pretty much everything that walks short of the biggest bears. I own a .300 wby, but have killed more elk with my .270

    I prefer Wbys MK V action to most (not the cheaper vangurd). But I think the Remington 700 is rock solid, it can be had in Wby .270, and like PerryB said sub MOA groups can be had "out of the box" There is a reason Marine Corps snipers use this action, and given the few the really use, it ain't cash...

    In the end if you don't much care for the Weatherby, I would have to agree that a good old Rem 700 bdl in 30 '06 would probably be the best "one gun"

    Sorry Jack

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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveE
    Given that criteria,,, you cant go wrong with a Rem 700... generally the most accurate out of the box... Bring it to NH and I will do a trigger job on it. 30-06 would be fine.
    I agree. I have a old 742 semi auto. I have shot dozens of deer and wouldn't hesitate to use it on something as big as black bear. Back before all the new designer cartridges the 30.06 was the big game cartridge in north america. You can shoot a wide variety of bullets and loads, and the ammo is cheap. Plus a bolt action will last forever with little or no maintenance, and is more accurate (IMO). If buying new, get a synthetic stock, or get a really nice old used one from the 60's or 70's.... again only my opinion

    Steve

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    I know we've got a lot of Remington fans here, and nothing against the 700, but I'm gonna stir the pot a little bit and suggest a Pre-64 Winchester 70 or an '03 Springfield, both with a good aperture sight. The way things are going, we won't be able to own a scoped rifle without a permit anyway, so I'm gettin pretty good with ma' irons.

    Reason I suggest these is that the Mauser action cannot be beat. There are more accurate actions out there like the 700 that are easier to true, but I would trade a little accuracy for a rifle that will feed and shoot every time, especially if I was around some of the cridders ya'll have up north; no time for a short stroke jam when a bear's bearing down on you.

    Additionally, I can field strip and further dissassemble either of these rifles with my bare hands, no special tools required.

    They're not gonna be MOA shooters, but they'll darn well shoot to 1.5 MOA. And yes they are expensive but you can still get shooters for about as much as a Remington- buy once cry once.

    They've been named the Rifleman's rifle for a reason!!

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    One thing about the o6 is that you will always be able to find cartridges for it, it having been the service round for many years there are lots of components available.

  15. #15
    375handh's Avatar
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    Not trying to stir the pot, but if you really want an all round hunting gun for Alaska or the world, it is the 375 H&H Magnum.

    Factory loads from 235 grain at 3100 fps to 350 grain at 2450 fps. Minimum legal size for most of Africa's dangerous game, perfect for all North American game, including coyotes.

    Ammunition available everywhere in the world.

    I also have to agree with the Winchester Model 70 (African Express, of course).
    Ineptocracy - A system of government where the least capable to lead are elected by the least capable of producing and where the members of society least likely to sustain themselves or succeed are rewarded with goods and services paid for by the confiscated wealth of a diminishing number of producers.

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    Bugs66's Avatar
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    The Speer reloading manual says if you have to throw away all other rifles and are left with one hunting caliber then .270 is the one to pick.

  17. #17

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    My favorite rifle is my Sako "Tikka" in .270 Out of the box it was the most accurate rifle that I have ever owned!
    "Why is it wives can't just accept the biological mystery of guns reproducing in gun cabinets, and let it go at that?" - Patrick F. McManus

  18. #18
    scout88305's Avatar
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    What Aggie Said! Here is one of my pre-64's and with the Mauser action I would give it the nod if limited to one rifle. The Remington 700 my 2nd choice. "Cheap AMMO" does not exist anymore. The way events are transpiring it will only get worse. Political uncertainty, a devalued dollar and loss of faith in many institutions is driving firearms and munitions sales right now. Purchasing rifles and or ammo through the CMP which Christina already mentioned is wise. The price cannot be beat anywhere! Buy a case or two of the M2 Ball to supplement your hunting loads and you are set for a long time. There are alot of calibers to select from but if you do not reload and want to practice the 30/06 from CMP is as ecomomical as you can make it in a popular round. The .308 or 7.62x51 NATO is nowhere as cheap right now. Take the steps I wouldn't wait very long. http://www.thecmp.org/ammosales.htm


    Thank a sheepdog today for they are standing guard!

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    I have a Winchester Model 70 in 25-06 with a Nikon 4x12 and it`s all I have hunted with for the past several years, my 06, 7mm-08, 243 have a ton of dust on em but all I hunt is deer in peanut fields and woods edges

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    If I were to get rid of all guns except one I would keep the .300 Winchester Magnum. Perhaps overkill for most situations, but it’s accurate, reliable, and effective. I’ve found many people shoot different guns differently and some guns I couldn’t shoot my foot if I tried. The .300, for me, just has good karma.

    Lippy

  21. #21
    Widebody's Avatar
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    I knew what you meant Bill, I went through this last Christmas when
    buying my son a rifle. It's the only one I will buy him, the rest will
    come out of his pocket.

    My choice was a simple one for me, 30-06.
    From large Moose to Whitetail deer and anything in between,
    which would include all Bears.

    I personally don't own one, nor have I ever shot one.
    But if I could only pick one rifle to own, it would be my choice.

    Brad

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    .30-06 Remington Model 700 laminated stock.

    Will out last you.

    Ammunition is everywhere.

  23. #23
    harneymaki's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveE
    Given that criteria,,, you cant go wrong with a Rem 700... generally the most accurate out of the box... Bring it to NH and I will do a trigger job on it. 30-06 would be fine.
    I have a 700 Mountain Rifle in 30 - 06 and it is great. 6.5 lbs, very accurate. The only thing I would like to changes is the trigger pull, then it would be the perfect rifle for this MN boy.

  24. #24
    Randy's Avatar
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    best hunting rifle

    I'll be the first to admit that I'm not an expert on hunting rifles...but I have my biases.
    I have to put my vote on the .300 Win mag.
    Mine is a 700 Remington...
    Bought it to go after Montana elk..but haven't had the privilege to shoot one YET...so I don't know how it works on them.
    Bought a cheap Simmons scope (3x9) with some decent Redfield mounts.
    Sighted it in ONCE 25 years ago (once is enough when you were using 200 + grain bullets )..Took three guys to get it where we wanted it. Sore shoulders, ect. Kinda like S2D's handloads
    Haven't needed to sight it in after that.
    Since then I have stuck with the 165 grain for everything...
    From coyotes to whitetails...has impressive knockdown power...you can tell from the "sound" that they aren't getting back up.
    From 100-300 yards...the aimpoint doesn't vary much.
    Some people might think it's a "meatgrinder"..but I don't think its even as bad as some smaller calibers I have used.
    Might be tempted to try a .300 WSM in a Browning autoloader sometime.
    Anybody like that one?
    Randy

  25. #25
    Bill Ingerson's Avatar
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    Hi Bill

    Rob and a few others are right about the 270. It does not kick much and is very flat shooting. I have had the magnums and still have the 30-06 but would get the 270 next time. You can shoot all of the big game but would maybe switch to a Bazooka for Alaska's big bears.

    Bill

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    T.J.'s Avatar
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    I used to have more guns than Cal Worthington had fords. However, I sold all them except a Stevens Crackshot Junior 22 cal.
    Browning A Bolt stainless 338 Win caliber. If I had to have one gun, that is it.

  27. #27
    Iflylower's Avatar
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    Without question the 30-06. why? And, it looks like you already know, because you mentioned it in the first post.

    1. ammo anywhere. like in the middle of nowhere when you lost yours at your campsite or shot it up protecting your stewpot.
    2. big game, small game. As in survival. Not too big, not too small.
    3. common - ammo, parts, ballistics.
    4. accurate, stable caliber, shoots fine with wide range of grains bullet. 75-200gr (can go smaller than 75 and more than 200, but what result?)
    5. shoots good with spear point. It's a stable, stable round. Long range.
    6. shoots good with a snub nose. Now your a brush gun with a bullet less likely to tumble when it nicks a twig.
    7. big enough to put down a brown bear (not my preference, but will all day long)
    8. small enough to pop a rabbit for dinner.
    9. Shootable - you mulekickers know what I'm talking about
    10. I'd shoot a 165 gr for everything. Or, more precisely, feed your rifle whatever you find it likes to eat the best!!

    I usually hunt with an .375H&H, .300win mag, .7MM, .45-70, .22-50. I own, but have never hunted with my .30-06, but then, I've never packed a gun for "whatever I need it for."

    I like a whatever gun for a back up. I certainly feel that way with my 870 shotgun. I usually hunt with an over/under, but I like the 870 because it doubles as a crowbar or hammer when you don't have one. And, you never get upset when it gets some "war wounds" from the field.

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    i have the choice of 2 pro steel safes full of hunting rifles, i seem to find a mod 70 270 in the cub every fall since my dad gave it to me @ 13. that being said, 1 rifle only would be a 300 win mag because of versatility in loads. the 270 works for me because i shoot it lots. has killed every large animal it's been pointed at even a 9+ griz. i am a model 70 fan only because that's what dad started me on. no rifle will work for you if you aren't comfy with it. my suggestion is buy lots of firearms, learn to use them, and NEVER EVER SELL A GUN EVER! they do make great gifts though.

    chris

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    Re: Best all around Rifle

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Rusk
    To all

    I am interested in purchasing a rifle. I am looking for the best general purpose all around rifle.
    if you could have only one rifle what would it be?

    Thanks

    Bill
    AK-47, lots of ammo thats cheap, if the commies decide to invade you can use their ammo too, you can kill what ever animal you wish plus have 29 extra bullets to back you if you miss with the first shot, You can drag it through mud and dirt and it will not jam(like the M-16, I know), Freezing weather and rain does not affect it.

  30. #30
    Gunny's Avatar
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    Bill – I was quite interested to see your post. I’ve been thinking about another bolt gun myself and in .30-06 because of the versatility of the caliber and availability of ammo for it. When you need a box of cartridges in West Podunk, Outback, and you drop in to Uncle Fred’s gas, dinner, general store, post office, dry goods, lumber, hardware and haircut emporium – there will likely be a box of ’06 on the self – but you will have to listen to Fred’s tales of chasing Spaniards out of Cuba with his Krag-Jorgensen .30-40 which was before them newfangled ‘06’s came out. And of course, as you have already seen, with the .30-06 you will have to accept the fact that you are wildly under-gunned for those once in a lifetime 5,000 yard wooly mammoth shots – through therapy I am learning to live with that reality and you can too…

    I’ve visited some gun counters, handled some rifles and done a fair amount of surfing and kind of narrowed my criteria for a .30-06 down to the following. A stainless steel barrel and action for weather resistance and ease of maintenance; laminated wood stock (or maybe synthetic – but laminated just looks better) again for weather resistance; a 22” barrel for portability in brush and weight savings humping up mountains without giving up too much performance at range; and finally a weight before scope of between 6.5 and 7.5 pounds which should keep scoped weight between 7.5 and 8.5 pounds. So, my short list ended up about like this:

    Remington 700 Mountain LSS
    http://www.remington.com/products/fi...untain_LSS.asp

    Ruger M77 Hawkeye Sporter
    http://www.ruger-firearms.com/Firear...17153&return=Y

    Kimber 8400 Montana
    http://www.kimberamerica.com/rifles/8400/8400_montana/

    Sako 85 Hunter Laminated Stainless
    http://www.sako.fi/sako85models.php?hunterlamss

    Tikka T3 Laminated Stainless
    http://www.tikka.fi/pdf/specs/T3LaminatedStainless.pdf

    I’ve handled all of these rifles except the Sako. All the actions were very smooth and felt remarkably similar. I don’t like the safety on the Ruger or the Kimber – feels awkward and a little out of place up too high on the bolt – maybe that’s because I’m used to the Remington style ( I have a 700P in .308 with a 26" heavy barrel). The Kimber only comes in a 24” barrel which just felt a little too long. The T3 felt a little too light – of course the one I handled had a synthetic stock not the laminated. I wish I could go to a range and shoot each of these rifles but that isn’t going to happen. The Tikka and Sako are rifled with a 1:11 twist which maybe a little too slow for heavier (180 – 220 grain) bullets based on data from Shilen; the Remington, Ruger and Kimber are rifled 1:10 which is good up to 220 grains.

    I’m leaning towards the Remington - it felt about right and I like the brown laminated stock better than the black/grey stock on the Tikka and Sako. Remington is about mid-way price wise between the Tikka and the Sako – Tikka felt a little cheap, maybe because it was so light – Sako is its expensive big brother. Savage didn’t offer a laminated stock on a .30-06 nor did Browning. I just didn’t like the black synthetic ones. Aesthetically, a rifle should have a nice hand rubbed walnut stock and be blued – but you can’t argue with the ease of maintenance in stainless steel and the weather resistance of laminated wood. Plenty of time for hand rubbing walnuts after you bring the meat home…

    Are you set on a bolt gun? Cause, if it doesn’t have to be a bolt gun there are some nice lever guns out there and .30-30 would be a good all around chambering there – again no 5,000 yard woolly mammoths, but they are chambering lever guns in some pretty hefty stuff these days like the new Marlin in 338 Marlin Express, but Uncle Fred won’t have them when you swing in for a box of ammo. Semi-autos are for ducks, geese, socialists and revenuers…

    Anyway – I’d be interested to hear what you are looking at and thinking and what you end up getting – heck – picking out a new rifle is almost as much fun as a Cub project and half the fun is the search. Whatever you get, build lots of range time into the training schedule – that’s the other half of the fun. I’ll let you know what I finally bring home.
    "You are the Gray Rider who would not make peace with the Blue Coats, you may go in Peace." - Ten Bears

    Gunny

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    Best All Around Rifle

    1. Rem. 700 30-06 stainless with synthetic stock. Put a Leupold 3-9 40mm VX11 on it.

    2.Sako and Tikka are both very good second choices with the advantage of having a clip in most models. Both available in stainless BBL-Actions with synthetic stocks. They do have a advantage over the Rem. 700 in that they are typically more accurate and invariably have better triggers.

    3. The 30-06 is the most popular modern hunting caliber for some very good reasons;
    A. Excellent range of bullet weights if you reload - from 110 gr. to 240 grains.
    B. Adequate power for all N. American big game.
    C. Flat shooting. Same class as .270 Winchester but with the bullets and power to take on the bigger of the big game, i.e. elk, moose, big bears.
    C. While stainless will rust, it's relatively carefree as compared to blued rifles.
    D. There are more Rem. 700 rifles sold than any other hunting rifle and likely more the the next three combined.
    E. Most common police and military (Rem. 700) rifle for sniper and tactical use, for many reasons.
    F. No I don't own one!! I've owned Winchester pre-64 Mod. 70's, Tikkas, Sakos, Rem-700s all before.

  32. #32
    JP's Avatar
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    My M-1 Carbine. Accurate, light and compact.
    JP Russell--The Cub Therapist
    1947 PA-11 Cub Special
    www.bloomerrussellbeaupain.com

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    Reference Carbine .30 M1:

    I've always thought them a little underpowered because the 30 carbine is basically a 32-20 WCF, which Dad always called a "deer woundin' S.O.B." But then again, I have my grandfather's M1 Carbine from Leyte Gulf, and it musta' been powerful enough to get him home, and his beach jumper missions were dangerous enough to warrant the Navy to write all his equipment off at issue.

    Funny story: Grandfather shot a doe with his carbine, and couldn't find it in tall grass. Of course his father in law, who owned the ranch they were hunting, was giving him all order of grief. When they finally found it, it had no evidence of a bullet wound, and Grandfather's father in law, not to be out done said "hell that thing's so loud you probably scared it to death." Of course he hit it exactly where he wanted to, but that little .30 didn't leave much if any of a mark on the animal.


    Those men were/are real characters, and I wish I could switch generations to be around them more ... I've about had it with my generation

  34. #34
    JP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aggieflyboy09
    Reference Carbine .30 M1:

    I've always thought them a little underpowered because the 30 carbine is basically a 32-20 WCF, which Dad always called a "deer woundin' S.O.B." But then again, I have my grandfather's M1 Carbine from Leyte Gulf, and it musta' been powerful enough to get him home.....
    It is a tad bit underpowered. A neighbor was in the Korean War and he said at long range it was tough to transmit stopping power through the enemies' padded winter jackets, so they switched to garands.

    I always load my .30 cal hunting rounds with a few extra grains. Got my first deer with one--right in the chest. Very hard to find the entry wound. It was a close shot, too.

    I hadn't shot a carbine in awhile and a friend let me have a go with his M2. It had more power than I remembered and was quite accurate at 150 yds. Didn't climb much in full auto but packed a nice little punch. Not like shooting full auto .223, which is like shooting with a sewing machine.

    How about that next to the last scene in "The Bridges at Toko Ri" when Mickey Rooney teaches William Holden how to use the M-1 Carbine...
    JP Russell--The Cub Therapist
    1947 PA-11 Cub Special
    www.bloomerrussellbeaupain.com

  35. #35

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    Bill

    Your correct in saying a 30-06 is the gold standard. I have taken many animals with a 30-06, it had been my first choice for many years.

    It all changed when I bought an old Remington 7mm mag and took it caribou hunting. Today when I head to the field I open my safe look at both rifles and grab the 7mm mag. I understand your living and hunting in a area where brown bears are not the pursuit so I doubt you would require one of the larger mags. The extra horsepower is impressive but it dose come with the cost of higher recoil. My 7mm mag felt recoil is less then my 06 but the rifle if heaver so it's not a fare comparison. The 7mm mag is a flat shooting hard hitting cartridge that will take any game you will hunt in the lower 48.

    My favorite bullet for the 30-06 was the 165 SBT. My favorite bullet in the 7mm mag is a 140 grain bullet but I'm equally happy with a 150 grain bullet. All three bullets bowl caribou over.

    Best of luck with your choice.

    Cub_Driver

  36. #36

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    There is no perfect rifle/caliber. Now that the myth is dispelled, let's see why.
    Ever gun is a compromise just like planes, boats and your choice of spouse. and, a lot of times based on emotion which will be defended to the death and tough to rationalize.
    I'm fortunate in that I have had several to choose from. Just today I took several out for a "walk" that I hadn't touched in a while, some much too long too.
    The 45/70 seems to be the latest "go to" gun for the last couple of years, lives in the plane with me. Mean 'ol gun and does a great job. Took the Huskavarna '06 out and with some 180gr corelokts, shot a <3/4" clover off a "bench" of a rolled up sleeping bag @ 100yds. Marlin Marauder in .35 rem, likes 'em hot with 200 gr Hornady fnsp. Savage model 99 in .300 Savage, my friend made a great group @ 100yds the first time she touched the gun today. I also have a 30-40 Krag that if you don't mind carrying it, works great on Caribou and just about everything else. Not bad for a >100 year old girl! None of these are top shelf guns, just well cared for and lovingly maintained. Those with scopes are single power and most are 20+ years old. All are wood stocks. My freezer is always full and whatever loose money goes towards av gas. There are only two rifles I would like someday. A Sako in 375 and a .223 bolt gun. Just because I like to shoot. I like levers a lot but the bolts are good too. I prefer older guns because of the quality of the machine work. That Krag has the silkiest action....! What ever you decide to get, shoot it a lot and get cozy with it. That will make it the "best" gun for you. Just like your Cub, you can have a great well outfitted plane and not know how to fly it. You can have something that looks like hell and you really know how to fly it. Doesn't mean it's the best, but it takes care of you.
    I've killed bears with an '06, lynx with a .22 and just recently discovered what an '06 with 55gr accelerators will do to a wolf. A 45/70 with a head shot will get a grouse too.
    Shoot a lot, shoot often and don't look back. We still have some options, exercise them. And have fun!

  37. #37

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    Jan 2007
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    I was thinking about recomending my 1895 in 45-70, but then got my wits about me. Ha I do love it though - will turn a bear inside out.

  38. #38

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    Dec 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by gcgilpin
    .30-06 Remington Model 700 laminated stock.

    Will out last you.

    Ammunition is everywhere.
    ditto, except mine is also stainless. Then if you want to really have fun bed, float and pillar are the key words at the gun smith and you will have a stable all weather performer. Regardless buy the very best scope and MOUNTS you can afford, shoot it a bunch and if factory ammo is your deal narrow it down to a couple of rounds and then buy a BIG batch in the same run and you're set for a long time.
    Remember, These are the Good old Days!

  39. #39
    Cubdude's Avatar
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    Apr 2005
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    Little Rock, AR
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    I've got a Ruger M77 chambered in 270. Never missed a deer!

    http://www.ruger.com/Firearms/FAFami...tion&famlst=31

  40. #40
    this would be a title NimpoCub's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Nimpo Lake, BC . . . AKA "the Floatplane Capital of BC"
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    WARNING: opinion follows

    Ruger & Winchester used to be very high quality guns, Remington has always been pretty good, above average. Remington has continued with their level of quality while Win & Ruger have "sit back on their reputation" & let quality slide a bit to put them behind Rem.

    There are of course high quality (expensive) brands, but for hunting purposes not really necessary. A dependable action & tight barrel (anything better 'n a Parker Hale) is a good hunting tool.

    As others have said, to get the most out of it, spend time with your shootin' iron & become familiar with it, just like you do w/your Cub.

    Calibers have everything to do with what you are chasing.
    Nimpo Lake Logan... boonie SuperCubber
    200mi (300km) from nearest stoplight... just right! - "Que hesitatus fornicatus est"

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