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Thread: Corvus Migrans the Wandering Raven

  1. #1

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    Corvus Migrans the Wandering Raven

    “The Wandering Raven” – new name for this long-time member of supercub.org. It suits me better, I think.
    For many years I’ve been drifting through the bush of North America in my little cub, doing it my way. Always according to the motto “the way should be the goal”.
    I land and camp where it’s nice and there’s room to put my cub down. In the evenings, by the campfire, I listen to the ghostlike call of the Great Horned Owl or the lonesome cry of the Arctic Loon.
    Sometimes on my flights in the huge nordic solitude I worry about not reaching my destination in bad weather. At other times, in marvelous CAVU, I enjoy the taiga and tundra in low level flight.
    Gravel bars, coasts or mountain heights – my cub always finds a little place to rest.
    Once again I am in preparation for a 2-3 month voyage through the north of North America. Since these voyages carry a high potential risk, I do not want to take responsibility for a companion.
    So I’m quite often sad not to be able to share my beautiful impressions and adventures with somebody.
    But by posting small life reports on this website I can at least share my joy with those of you who love the beauty of wilderness as I do.
    I’ll start in about three weeks and will try to upload diary-like reports, when I find internet access somewhere in the middle of nowhere.
    O.K. friends – let’s see where I’ll end up.
    The wandering raven

  2. #2
    Bill Ingerson's Avatar
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    Long flight

    Looking forward to your adventures. Send alot of pictures of your fish and other incounters. Read a book about a guy who did the same thing in a PA-11 on floats. He took bladder fuel tanks for extra fuel. Then several years in a row was in the Canada (north) on the east coast. Alot of history. Hope to read alot about your trip. A couple things to remember. 1) Never run! Food runs
    2) Never take a Laxative and sleeping pill at the same time.


    Bill

  3. #3
    hotrod180's Avatar
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    Re: Long flight

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Ingerson
    ... Never take a Laxative and sleeping pill at the same time. Bill
    Sound advice, Bill, whether at home or abroad.
    Cessna Skywagon-- accept no substitute!

  4. #4
    Gunny's Avatar
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    C-V - I like your new handle and I am looking forward to your posts from your trip. Fly safe and keep us posted!
    "You are the Gray Rider who would not make peace with the Blue Coats, you may go in Peace." - Ten Bears

    Gunny

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    Hi friends!
    4 weeks ago I got a cold, which turned out pretty severe and I still feel weak. But I got my little bomber back in the air and practiced a lot on gravel bars. Three days ago I made a 560 miles test flight before I take off for my big voyage. I flew from Fairbanks to the Porcupine River and set up an overnight camp. It was beautiful warm if not hot weather.
    Next morning at 7 o’clock the “goodmorningwakeupservice” came. I heard a little noise at the tent wall and, only 7 feet away, I looked into the broad face of a grizzly bear. We both had surprised faces for sure. I roared at him and started digging in my mess for my gun. He grunted, swatted short with his paw to my tent and left me with a head size hole in the tent wall. Finally I managed to get out of the tent with my gun in my hand and I saw a two year old grizz slowly wandering away.
    Curiously I back tracked him. I found that he came from over 600 yards across the gravel bar, against the wind, with my full scent in his nose, direct to my tent. And that was an amazing behaviour for a grizz.
    Well, these are the “bush people”. They come and bite holes in your expensive Bushwheels, taste your Cub fabric, rip up your tents or trample with their big hoofs through your camp kitchen. But if you do not like it, stay out of their living rooms.
    If this year continues like this, it will for sure be a very exciting one.



    The wandering raven
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  6. #6
    this would be a title NimpoCub's Avatar
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    Thanks, CV, for your post/pics.

    Could you take the time to do a bit of a caption on your pics?
    That old disappearing boat in someone's long-ago camp kinda tugged at my heart.

    You're living the dream.. keep us dreamin'!!

  7. #7
    Anne's Avatar
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    Forgive my ignorance, but who did you used to be?

    Anne.
    Baloney is still baloney, no matter how thin you slice it.

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    Porcupine River Bank

    Picturesqe back slough at the Black River area

    The hole in the wall the grizz left at the Porcupine when looking through my door

    Stupid two year old blacks bite in everything. This time in my brand new bushwheels

    I built this canvas canoe 15 years ago. Now the blacks got it. I do not know yet how they could get over the can armory

    I wanted to be off this morning direction Dawson and further to the east, but the weather here in Fairbanks was bad. So I have a little time to give the information. Corvus Migrans formerly Heege-Brigmann
    The wandering raven

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    I am finally in the air. Beautiful weather to Dawson. Two very nice custom ladies waited for my. It was a pleasure to pass.
    I sat camp at the Yukon. Next day I landed at Faro, refuelled and camped over night. From there I flew
    the South Nahanni River to the Ram Creek the “Little Grand Canyon of the North” later I landed at Ft. Simpson.
    Man was the fuel expensive here. 2,39/litre + call out charge 50.-$ (Holyday is 150 $ , outch!) + 5% Tax. So 173 litres had
    cost me about 450,- can$.





















    The wandering raven

  10. #10
    12Geezer2's Avatar
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    NICE photos---keep em coming

  11. #11
    55-PA18A's Avatar
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    Great photos. Looks like a fun trip. Have you ever read R.M. Paterson's "Dangerous River" ? It's about his canoe trip up the Nahanni R in the early 1900s. Even has some photos. Thought you might enjoy that as some background for your trip.

    What's the shooter? Looks like an interesting rifle.

    Jim

  12. #12
    this would be a title NimpoCub's Avatar
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    Thanks again, CV. Good to "see ya".

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    These are great photos.
    I'm curious why you capitalize migrans? I would have expected it to be lower case.
    All the best,
    JimC

  14. #14
    Bill Ingerson's Avatar
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    Trip

    This is a great story unfolding. Im going to buy a map of and chart your flight. Everytime you post something about your trip. Mention your last stop of the day. Most of us will never do what your doing and its fun to look at new areas with you. Keep the good pictures coming. Don,t forget the fish.

    Bill

  15. #15
    Christina Young's Avatar
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    CV, keep 'em coming, I love your style!

    Not just the pretty scenery, but also things that happen along the way (like the bears), and how you are doing the trip with the pictures of your camping stuff and how the plane is packed, that's what makes it so special!

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    Hi friends!
    After a few days downtime, due to little engine problems, I could not hesitate to return to the Ram River plateau. This time it became a little bit late, midnight. Well, midnight in the north, there is still a lot light left. But before that I had to fly through the high mountains. The ceiling was about 6-7000’ but also haze, mist and drizzle, but still far more than two miles vis. With that lid on the valleys it was a challenge to find the way through the labyrinth of these canyons and gullies at dawn. Without GPS and a slow cub it would have been almost impossible, because I had to make several 180°s in narrow places to find the right way. But I had the marvellous back up of 9 hours flight endurance, so I could fool around or return any time. Finally I arrived at the Ram River. But with that dim light I had some problems to find “my“ plateau. The wind 20 mls was so favourable that I tried some approaches and it worked out good, so I landed. The 31” Bush Wheels are really nice and with the Baby B.W. you did not feel much of the rough surface. Only the angle to the right scared me a bit when I stopped. I was afraid tipping to the side and rolling into the 3000 feet deep canyon. Which was only 30-40 feet away. Anyway I managed it to taxi to my “tie down tree” and sat camp at 1°° a.m. in a northern night. The next day I enjoyed the unlimited view over the mountains of this marvellous beautiful but rough landscape.
    Well, the signs on the plateau are showing that here must be some severe winds. Almost no trees on the high surfaces and when, they are small and crippled. And now the weather is changing. A storm is approaching.
    Right now as I am writing this, the wind shakes severely my tent and the rain is hard drumming on the walls. Outside the low clouds at 4000’ are chasing each other. But as long as my little bomber stays put. it’s all O.K.!
    Sorry friends when I seldom answer your questions. But while travelling I do not find internet access everywhere any time. I am doing all the work on my laptop in my camps somewhere, so I can load down fast. To reload my electronic batteries I use my board battery. So sometimes I have to hand prop the engine, because of a low battery. But especially the pictures take time. And if you make a mistake and I do often, you start from the beginning. But I really enjoy it to read your feedback. It gives me the drive for all the work and it makes me happy to share my adventures and fun at least in this way with people they are in the same way as me.
    Well, in the meantime (next day) the weather improved. Among sheep, ptarmigan and arguing ground squirrels (because my tent was right at their hole) I am looking forwards for a good take off.
    Well, this was exciting. Ceiling is up, you have packed up and hand propped your engine, have taxied 300 yds over rough terrain, turn around and ------------ FOG. Within a few minutes the dew point changed and dropped the ceiling, what is common in the mountains. A little ptarmigan cock 40 yds away sitting on a high spot observed me in this mist, while a sat in my little raven and waited. 40 minutes later, hearing distant rumpling of an oncoming thunderstorm, the ceiling lifted that much, about 60 feet, that I could see the gap of Little Doctor Lake in the far distance and the clear plain behind. Hand propping again and off I went.
    At Ft. Simpson an hour later I made a new flight plan to Yellowknife and again I went away. With a good tailwind 2 ½ hours later I arrived Whitebeach Point at the Great Slave Lake, 15 minutes cub time to the west of Yellowknife. A 22 year young Cessna 208 pilot lady at Ft.Simpson gave me the info to look there for a landing.
    Next day with an indicated rest of 4 gallons left in my tanks I landed at Yellowknife (actually I had set my fuel indicator to cheat me for about 5 gallons).
    I flew on 57 gallons (I had a 5 gls jug fuel as reserve on board) from Faro to Yellowknife. That is for sure not bad for a cub!
    Yellowknife

    [img][/img]
    The wandering raven

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    The wandering raven

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    behindpropellers's Avatar
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    Great pics.
    Take lots at YK!!

    Do you file flight plans all of the time? Does anybody know where you are out there? Just curious??

    Tim

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    The wandering raven

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    The wandering raven

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    Mathew Sharp's Avatar
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    Amazing photos, thanks for sharing! Nice fuel flow and temp instruments btw!~

    Matt

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    Hi friends!
    Here I am again. Stopping at Yellowknife was an experience, only 20000 inhabitants but being a modern busy town.
    After refueling I crossed the Great Slave Lake to Lutselk’è at the Snowdrift River , sat camp and went fishing
    to the rapids. I got a pike and two trouts. Good for two dinners and some more days. Because it was weekend and I
    needed cash money I had to return to Yellowknife at Monday.Refueling again at Yellowknife I met Paul Laserich one
    of the owners of Adlair an absolutely friendly man. He gave me one of his antique old Chevies to go shopping. Now
    I know what it is to drive such big ancient car. You do not drive you glide!
    Once in the air, again I wanted to sat camp at
    Whitebeach Point . But I was so heavy that I was afraid, once on the ground, not to become airborne again in this
    small place. So like a wandering raven I decided
    in the air to turn north now. I looked at the map and found that Wek We Ti was laying north en route and would be a good
    point to stop over night. So I turned my course in that direction flying into the northern night. Flying lonely over this
    huge vast emptiness and listening to engines voice.
    Finally, again at midnight, I arrived the new remote but empty airport of Wek We Ti, which belonged to a village with
    120 people of the Dog Rib Tribe. Next day Johnny an Indian woke me up, a very nice and friendly man, who offered
    me next morning a thermos full with hot coffee. He is married to a Phillipinian wife (that really means to be
    international). He was curious how I could get up on a little hill through a ditch beside the taxiway. Well, this is a 180 hp
    cub on BWs! , besides also an off road vehicle. But here the sand-flieses got me. Several big swollen pimples on my arms
    and my neck.
    When I continued my flight, following my flight plan (filing flight plans, in which way ever, is mandatory in Canada.
    Mine are extended flight plans for 2-4 days with several landings plus rescue time), I stopped at Port Radium at
    the Great Bear Lake, just to get a short rest and to have visited this historic site. At the airstrip were two camps
    for the reconstruction crews, which break down the old structures to restore the nature. Here I met a couple they
    are maintaining the heavy equipment, which showed me a picture of a monster lake trout, he caught while trolling on the lake.
    Airborne again I flew an additional half hour to the Coppermine River and on a very nice gravel bar I sat camp. Man
    this was a very nice place and the strong (15knots, the average wind speed here is 9 knots!!!) but warm (80F!!)
    wind blew the bugs away. Next morning four Norwegian river drifters woke me up. I guess almost every river here
    up north gets some when sometimes tourists. This was for this far up north a hot day.
    I tried to catch an arctic char, nothing. I made a rough landing at Muskox Falls next day, nothing.
    I continued to Bloody Falls, this time with a very rough landing, nothing. I got later told that the Arctic Char, right now,
    are in the ocean. But I really was again surprised by the versatility, possibility and sturdiness of the cub. Landing
    at Muskox Falls on a sand covered grass overgrown boulder island with big boulders in your way (you really had to find a
    direttissima) was not that bad, but at Bloody Falls I landed in plus-minus foot deep grass bogs with swampy holes between.
    From the air it looked nice and inviting but once on the ground it really shook me, but the mains took the punching easy.
    All the banging and pounding came from the Baby BW tail wheel. Take off in this kind of terrain was as ever tricky and also
    challenging. Sometimes, because you could not verify your pass safely, I had to mark my 300- 360 feet long take off “runway”
    with toilet paper not to hit the big boulders and holes.
    Finally I arrived in Kugluktuk/Nunavut and weathered in, FOG again. But Larry Whitaker a resident, I met two years ago on
    one of my previous voyages through the north, gave me accommodation. So we had nice entertaining days and his wife a very
    good cook filled our bellies up to the brim. But the shower I could get after 14 days was the best!
    Now I am laying on my foam mattress while writing this. My camp is on a wide open place across Bathurst Lodge.
    I landed here with a 20-25 knots blowing hot wind from the south. En route I had to circumnavigate several
    thunderstorms. One was developing within 8-10 minutes! out of a tiny gray cloud to a big strong gray storm.
    I almost had past that when I got hit by an updraft. Within two minutes it lifted me up from 1500’ AGL to almost 4500
    feet. Nice, it saved me some gas in a slow descend.
    And for sure you’ll believe, that it was really entertaining to set up a tent with winds blowing up to 25 knots, but it
    was manageable in the wind shadow of my raven, tied to a big stone.
    And again the nuisance of the north: Mosquitoes.
    In any wind shadow they landed on me and immediately started their meal.
    After a windy night with little rain and a long sleep, I walked to the Burnside River waterfalls.
    The river divides here in two channels both are rapids. I only could visit the north channel. But man, was that bombastic!
    Sitting only 10 to 20 feet above the roaring, thundering waters sometimes getting the feet washed. And you believe or not:
    No tourists or tourist buses (smile). I enjoyed this pearl in the arctic on my own, but somehow a little sad not to have
    somebody here to share with.
    At the foot of that shoot was a big eddy and I got my fish: Two arctic chars and six graylings. I took the big one
    with me for food. The chars are really good fighters. On the way back I collected a cap full of mushrooms (funny
    they grow in the arctic too) and fried them with some eggs for dinner. Now in the evening it is calm and the mosquitoes
    are humming by the hundreds outside of my tent, angry that they cannot eat me and once in a while a ptarmigan is calling close by.
    I woke up at 3am with loud thunder. Thunderstorms were approaching. I cleaned everything up and secured my tent and
    went to bed again. Next morning the ceiling was on the ground and it rained. That destroyed my plans to be in Cambridge Bay
    today. I do not like it to pack up a wet camp. But at noon the weather lifted up and finally the sun came out.
    Breaking camp between the still oncoming rainstorms took it’s time. Take off in 15 knots wind was short. I made a last low
    approach over the waterfalls and headed to the Wilberforce Falls at the Hood River. Thirty minutes later I landed on an
    esker about a mile away from the river. My last visit here was two years ago. This time the water is high and so the action was great.
    These are the highest water falls north of the Arctic Circle. The water was thundering into the almost 300 feet deep dark
    cut in two cataracts.
    Because I didn’t like to fly next day two hours to Cambridge Bay I continued my flight to the Kent Peninsula.
    This is a flat peninsula almost no elevations. 40 knots wind from 300° and boggy country. Out of the air everything
    looked smooth and nice to land. But low I had carefully to choose my place. With 25-30 knots wind on the
    surface it was a short landing run. Erecting my tent in that kind of wind was the greatest challenge I ever had.
    But in the wind shadow of my cub it was manageable. I guess the real fun started at the Coppermine River. From
    there on every off airport landing was a real challenge. What I have to note specially are the almost ever present
    strong winds. If it is in the old books I read, or getting a weather briefing, they do not talk much about the winds.
    But for me with my little airplane it is a nuisance. Well, right now I am writing this the wind is shaking my tent
    and rattling seriously my plane. I wonder how I’ll get out of here and land at Cambridge Bay. Well, we’ll see.
    Well, next day turning the plane in this wind was tricky, but take off was 60 feet and to Cambridge Bay 19 minutes with
    45 mls tailwind. When I approached Cambridge Bay a fog bank came in from the still icy coast. It was again an
    interesting task to fly under a fog layer searching for the airport and than landing with an almost 27 knots crosswind.
    Everything until now I had no problems and than here on the airport it almost got me, the wind wanted to lift up my left wing.
    I do not know if it was luck or proficiency that nothing happened, but I made it.
    Cambridge Bay
    The wandering raven

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  27. #27
    Speedo's Avatar
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    Wonderful descriptions and photos. Please keep them coming.

    Eric
    Speedo

  28. #28
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    Great descriptive writing and cool pictures. Thanks for taking the time to share your magic carpet ride. Love the alternate use for toilet paper. Eric
    Thank a sheepdog today for they are standing guard!

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    Hi friends!
    I was so lucky to get from Adlair a case 15W-50 aviation oil. Piston-oil is pretty hard to get here up north.
    Everything is set up for turbines. The wind went up to almost 35 knots, but my fueled up “ton-cub” sat
    quite on the ground with parking brakes on. After a short shopping to get food I sat until 2 am at my laptop
    and placed my diary in supercub.org. At 3 am the wind was down and I got the weather briefing: (Gjoa
    Haven forecast 40-50 knits wind!! to much for my cub) and filed a three day extended flight plan to Rankin Inlet.
    I do not like to stay in the civilization, when I have the choice to be in the nature. Tired as I was,I flew direct to
    Allice River in search of a nice camp place. As a “gravelbar specialist” I expected somewhere a nice landingsite.
    Just above the first rapids I found a huge beautiful levelled sandbar, a real pearl and so I had a marvelous rest
    for the days. In the evening a storm front approached. Thunderstorms came at first, than strong winds and rain.
    The wind became so strong that I filled two of my tie down sandbags with sand and to tie 400lbs on my upwind wing.
    The rain came horizontally over the ground pushed by the gale. 20 hours wind, rain, humidity, condensation on the
    inside of the tentwalls, what a feeling, but at least I had a nice flat levelled bed.
    When it improved next day I broke camp and taxied into the wind when I realized while checking the brakes, that
    my left brake had no action. Shock! When I looked at it, it looked like the tire was off. A closer look showed me
    that the whole brake disk/drum had broken off completely. I once again I was happy that it happened before flight.
    A landing not being aware that one brake was inoperable, would have ended for sure in an accident in a bad
    crosswind situation (which is almost ever the case). I called up CARS for the winds in Camebridge Bay and sat camp
    again to wait for the next day and to sleep this situation over. If I would had a jack I could have made a field repair
    easy. But on the tundra you have no wood to make a jack and I am not that strong to lift 1000 lbs. Next morning I
    called the flight service with my Iridium Satphone (this worked absolutely beautiful here up north). Man, were they
    happy to hear from me. CARS had reported them from my mishap. They really keep track of their pilots.
    Cambridge Bay, Rankin Inlet was IFR so they advised me for my flight to stop at Baker Lake where weather and
    wind direction should be the better choice. Taking off was easy. But immediately I had my head in the soup.
    What you do not realize at the ground is the heights of a blanket layer with an unlimited horizontal view. This
    ceiling was only 60-80 AGL but the ground was flat almost like a table. So I cruised between 5-15 feet AGL to the
    south, where I saw the light. Flying that low I observed in any pond, in any creek eddy at least one waterfowl
    family if not hundreds of birds. For the next hour I estimated, that I had seen two thousand birds on the waters.
    Three and a half hour later I arrived at Baker Lake: Runway heading 340°, wind direction out of 300°-310°.
    What a situation for me, without brakes. But I took the wind for my advantage. I took the very right side of
    the runway and dragged the plane in with full flaps, aiming diagonally to the left side. I managed it to miss a
    runway light by applying a short powerburst and let the wind do to brake me down. But taxiing to the taxiway
    was a challenge. Light falling terrain half quartering wind and it became a slalom between taxi lights and finally
    a fight to stop and hold the cub in place. But a man came to help me and we placed two pallets as wheel chokes.
    The people here in Baker Lake were absolutely helpful. I got a jack, a grinder and a drilling machine. Within one
    hour I had drilled precisely three new holes into the drum that it fits like original. The whole repair took three hours
    and I was ready to go. Well, what an exciting occurrence. Brad a 32 year old pilot who flew one of the two
    Turbine Otters (he has 6500 hrs flight time on his back) offered me his lunch sandwich while I was working on
    the apron. He also gave me the tip to fly to the Kazal River at the south side of Baker Lake to set camp there.
    I may see some Muskoxen and Caribous. And right. On landing on a little esker I observed a heard of these animals
    close by and while setting camp a caribou heard passed slow in a distance of a mile.
    But when I woke up next morning and was looking out of my tent I saw 4 big humps 240 feet away on the ground.
    4 Muskoxen were resting in front of my tent with my full scent in their nose. Four hours later when they left I
    took my fishing gear and went for the waterfalls to catch dinner. One cast, first bait and I got a 15 lbs Arctic
    char than two graylings and another 9 Chars. The last was so strong he broke the swivel and took off with my
    Mep #3. I filet the first for dinner. On the way back I found a peregrine falcon nest with three white feather balls
    in it. Man did the parent dive-bomb me. Next morning I called North Bay radio to get the weather for Rankin Inlet.
    They advised me to fly in the afternoon because of low ceiling. Here at Baker Lake it was marvellous. So
    I started at 2 pm in hope the forecast would be right. After flying half the way and turning from the waters of
    Chesterfield Inlet to Ranking Inlet the weather deteriorated. I flew through mist and under low ceiling
    between 15-30 feet AGL for an hour but I had even in the mist at least two miles visibility in dry air sometimes
    even 8-10 miles. God grace, that this country is flat like a table. When I arrived Rankin Inlet I took a hotel room.
    I guess you understand when I got a shower and fresh washed cloth that I felt like a king.
    Rankin Inlet
    The wandering raven

  30. #30

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    Hi friends!
    I was so lucky to get from Adlair a case 15W-50 aviation oil. Piston-oil is pretty hard to get here up north.
    Everything is set up for turbines. The wind went up to almost 35 knots, but my fueled up “ton-cub” sat
    quite on the ground with parking brakes on. After a short shopping to get food I sat until 2 am at my laptop
    and placed my diary in supercub.org. At 3 am the wind was down and I got the weather briefing: (Gjoa
    Haven forecast 40-50 knits wind!! to much for my cub) and filed a three day extended flight plan to Rankin Inlet.
    I do not like to stay in the civilization, when I have the choice to be in the nature. Tired as I was,I flew direct to
    Allice River in search of a nice camp place. As a “gravelbar specialist” I expected somewhere a nice landingsite.
    Just above the first rapids I found a huge beautiful levelled sandbar, a real pearl and so I had a marvelous rest
    for the days. In the evening a storm front approached. Thunderstorms came at first, than strong winds and rain.
    The wind became so strong that I filled two of my tie down sandbags with sand and to tie 400lbs on my upwind wing.
    The rain came horizontally over the ground pushed by the gale. 20 hours wind, rain, humidity, condensation on the
    inside of the tentwalls, what a feeling, but at least I had a nice flat levelled bed.
    When it improved next day I broke camp and taxied into the wind when I realized while checking the brakes, that
    my left brake had no action. Shock! When I looked at it, it looked like the tire was off. A closer look showed me
    that the whole brake disk/drum had broken off completely. I once again I was happy that it happened before flight.
    A landing not being aware that one brake was inoperable, would have ended for sure in an accident in a bad
    crosswind situation (which is almost ever the case). I called up CARS for the winds in Camebridge Bay and sat camp
    again to wait for the next day and to sleep this situation over. If I would had a jack I could have made a field repair
    easy. But on the tundra you have no wood to make a jack and I am not that strong to lift 1000 lbs. Next morning I
    called the flight service with my Iridium Satphone (this worked absolutely beautiful here up north). Man, were they
    happy to hear from me. CARS had reported them from my mishap. They really keep track of their pilots.
    Cambridge Bay, Rankin Inlet was IFR so they advised me for my flight to stop at Baker Lake where weather and
    wind direction should be the better choice. Taking off was easy. But immediately I had my head in the soup.
    What you do not realize at the ground is the heights of a blanket layer with an unlimited horizontal view. This
    ceiling was only 60-80 AGL but the ground was flat almost like a table. So I cruised between 5-15 feet AGL to the
    south, where I saw the light. Flying that low I observed in any pond, in any creek eddy at least one waterfowl
    family if not hundreds of birds. For the next hour I estimated, that I had seen two thousand birds on the waters.
    Three and a half hour later I arrived at Baker Lake: Runway heading 340°, wind direction out of 300°-310°.
    What a situation for me, without brakes. But I took the wind for my advantage. I took the very right side of
    the runway and dragged the plane in with full flaps, aiming diagonally to the left side. I managed it to miss a
    runway light by applying a short powerburst and let the wind do to brake me down. But taxiing to the taxiway
    was a challenge. Light falling terrain half quartering wind and it became a slalom between taxi lights and finally
    a fight to stop and hold the cub in place. But a man came to help me and we placed two pallets as wheel chokes.
    The people here in Baker Lake were absolutely helpful. I got a jack, a grinder and a drilling machine. Within one
    hour I had drilled precisely three new holes into the drum that it fits like original. The whole repair took three hours
    and I was ready to go. Well, what an exciting occurrence. Brad a 32 year old pilot who flew one of the two
    Turbine Otters (he has 6500 hrs flight time on his back) offered me his lunch sandwich while I was working on
    the apron. He also gave me the tip to fly to the Kazal River at the south side of Baker Lake to set camp there.
    I may see some Muskoxen and Caribous. And right. On landing on a little esker I observed a heard of these animals
    close by and while setting camp a caribou heard passed slow in a distance of a mile.
    But when I woke up next morning and was looking out of my tent I saw 4 big humps 240 feet away on the ground.
    4 Muskoxen were resting in front of my tent with my full scent in their nose. Four hours later when they left I
    took my fishing gear and went for the waterfalls to catch dinner. One cast, first bait and I got a 15 lbs Arctic
    char than two graylings and another 9 Chars. The last was so strong he broke the swivel and took off with my
    Mep #3. I filet the first for dinner. On the way back I found a peregrine falcon nest with three white feather balls
    in it. Man did the parent dive-bomb me. Next morning I called North Bay radio to get the weather for Rankin Inlet.
    They advised me to fly in the afternoon because of low ceiling. Here at Baker Lake it was marvellous. So
    I started at 2 pm in hope the forecast would be right. After flying half the way and turning from the waters of
    Chesterfield Inlet to Ranking Inlet the weather deteriorated. I flew through mist and under low ceiling
    between 15-30 feet AGL for an hour but I had even in the mist at least two miles visibility in dry air sometimes
    even 8-10 miles. God grace, that this country is flat like a table. When I arrived Rankin Inlet I took a hotel room.
    I guess you understand when I got a shower and fresh washed cloth that I felt like a king.
    Rankin Inlet
    The wandering raven

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    The wandering raven

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    The wandering raven

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    The wandering raven

  34. #34
    Snert's Avatar
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    Pretty cool! I look forward to your posts.

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    Bob Breeden's Avatar
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    corvus-migrans

    Corvus Migrans,

    Congratulations on a summer well spent! That is quite an adventure you are having. Thanks for sharing it.

    My 14 year old son and I took a trip exploring together in the Cub this summer - so I know what you have done there is precious!

    Bob Breeden

    www.AlaskaAirpark.com

  36. #36
    this would be a title NimpoCub's Avatar
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    Yeah, that char looks delicious in the pan, but am I s'posed to believe you just pick 'em up out'a the stream? That's what the pic looks like!

    Keep on travelin' & sharin, you ol' crow (I mean raven)

  37. #37
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    CV,

    Great documentary of your adventure. I'm curious about the electric fence sign in your gear photo. Did you have your fence up when the griz showed up at your tent for breakfast or did you get it after the encounter?

    I have a fence that I set up but have yet to test it with a bear encounter. I'm not sure I want to either. I did hook myself to it and it worked just fine.

    Jerry
    If it looks smooth...it might be

    If it looks rough...it is!!

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    Hi friends!
    I really feel sorry not to answer on your many commentaries. But I am happy to find nice people on the way
    they let me connect into the Internet. Mostly at the CARS and I do not like to stretch their patience. Thanks
    once more to all these people on the trail they let me do this. When I’ll be back home in two month I have for sure
    some time to answer all those questions they breed in your mind.

    Here in Rankin I got a barrel 100LL for cheap 375 Can $. But I had to transfer the fuel with my own pump into the wings.
    One thing is noticeable: Where ever I was, sooner or later the people walk by admiring my cub, also being interested
    about my voyage. I stood in Rankin for a while to wash up and to get a shower.
    When I was rested and recreated I continued again. And it became late again when I took off, as ever. But I like to
    fly into the evening. The wind goes down and the sunset gives the landscape a romantic touch. When you land
    here up north and the sun is slowly diminishing at the horizon producing long contrasting shadows it sets me into a
    rest and peaceful mood, just right to set camp and go to bed, and so I did after flying 3 ½ hrs to Southhampton Island
    and crossing a 40 mls wide strait. I landed on a 600ft long lime split hump somewhere in the tundra, I found
    convenient for me. And I had for the next days marvelous weather, which I enjoyed doing nothing but reading,
    sleeping or walking. At Coral Harbor I blended my fuel with 5 gls car gas to have a very good reserve going to
    Ivujivik or even Salluit my next expected refueling points. If you are going to cross a 100 refueling wide sea
    strait you want to be sure not to run out of fuel over the sea. But North Bay reported bad weather at Ivujivik.
    The line between high and low was a line north to south at Nottingham Island. So I decided to fly as far as possible
    to the south-east of Southhampton Island make camp there and sit out the weather. While I unpacked my camping
    gear I heard a bleat. There came an orphan caribou calf running thinking I would be its mother. But when it got my
    scent it showed me the butt. On landing in this sometimes featureless terrain I didn’t see a two feet high ground
    undulation and my cub made a huge jump when hitting it. I goosed it a little bit and settled down. Well, this is what
    happens always ever in one way or the other when doing off airport operations. I sat up a bear alarm. The
    people in Coral Harbour warned me I would be right in Pole bears habitat. I was anxious to get some pictures of these
    big bears. But none showed up. Next day I was fogged in for some time. The ceiling was on the ground. So I waited
    knowing when the sun will come up it will melt off the fog. The call a day later, I still had bad weather, to the FSS
    reported at Ivujivik 500sct 1000 sct 3000 brkn and flyable visibility for the next 10 hours. So I took the chance packed
    up again and took off. I had a visibility of 1-2mls over the water and a ceiling of somewhere 100-200 feet. But also
    for sure I knew, I had no obstacles in front of me for the next 100 mls. But friends, flying in the soup for the first 45
    minutes with foamy waves almost touching your wheels, because the ceiling came almost on the water, it was amazing
    what thoughts came up. But actually nothing has changed with my flying except the terrain under me. It is funny to
    observe the psychology of your mind. I was still over open water an hour later but it had cleared up a bit. Now I flew
    1000-2000 ft MSL and my mood became so much better, but it still was the same situation! I had up to 50 mls headwind
    30° from the left. So it took two hours to arrive at Ivujivik. That wind was not reported. You always have to
    consider this and other possible circumstances when you do that kind of flying I do. Try to have always 10-15 gls fuel
    in reserve. Wind strength and direction here up north changes so fast, from calm to blowing 50 mls, from tail to nose.
    AND take your time. Learn to overcome the “goitis” which gets so many people in trouble. If in doubt, sleep a night.
    The people here in Ivujivik are very friendly and as ever here up north very helpful and well behaved. For me it is a
    joy to be in touch with them and learn about their customs. In Ivujivik some of the women wear the old style suites
    with the skirts cut out at the sides and bearing their babies in a kind of sack or hood on the back in the old Inuit fashion
    way. And one real thing I observed here in town, there are far more kids then adults and a blond nurse which sticks
    out of the black haired people like a light house.
    I got my drum 100LL. It coasts me 820 Can $. Outch!
    But well, this is up north and transportation and storage is expensive. But I am happy. So I extended my flight plan
    to Labrador City. A NOTAM said that they are out of 100LL in Kuujjuaq AND Scheffersville. So I have to blend my avgas
    on the way with car gas. This is no problem here up north because the car gas has to be of a very high quality. I got told
    that they run here at least 92 octane if not 96. Anything else and the snowmobiles strike in the extreme cold.
    So there has to be absolutely no alcohol in the car gas. Because it became late and the wind was up to 20 knots
    gusting 28 and I want to make a 1000 mls flight to Labrador City, I decided to stay another night at the airport
    of Ivujivik. Also a Twinotter landing at Salluit reported a severe windshear. So I had to expect strong turbulence
    at the flight along the coast. Ceiling was also not favorable for sight-flying on the coast.
    I do not know if it is destination or not. I woke up the next morning and a very dense fog wetted my tent. But wind was
    calm. Adami Ainalik the CARS man here was so friendly and let me sit in his room to write this and to dry out from
    the wet fog. He also offered me lots of coffee and gave me an arctic char to fry.
    Days later I took off at 7:30 am and flew to Kangirsuk to buy 20gls autofuel to blend my 100ll with. And here it
    almost got me. On touch down, being concentrated to handle the 15-20 knots wind from almost 90° from the left two
    caribous suddenly appeared out of the right ditch and ran in front of my path. One retreated but the first I missed
    barely by 4-6 feet. The CARS man said the day before a thousand caribous had crossed the runway.
    For the past hours I flew along fog swept cliffs and over vast really barren landscapes and saw nothing! I passed the
    huge 2 ½ mls wide steep meteorite crater “Crater Nouveau de Quebeq” with a lake in it and now that, a “near miss”.
    But friends if you really want to see barren country fly north west Quebec. When I called FSS for weather info
    and asked the lady what is between Ivujivik and Sheffersville she laughed and said “there is nothing”. Next stop
    was at Kuujjuaq. A NOTAM from the FSS said there is no 100LL available up to the August 15. So I transferred the
    fuel out of my jugs from the cabin into the wing tanks and off I went again. The weather was “hot” and marvellous
    sunny and I had only 15 mls wind on the nose. I was heading towards Schefferville or better was looking for a
    campsite between. But since about Kuujjuaq the trees were back and so the before rare landing sites became almost
    nil or to rocky or swampy very risky emergency sites. I turned my course to Rivière Caniapiscau north of Scheffersville.
    And right again, 30 minutes later in the last light I arrived at huge sand bars but they were “wavy”. In dawn I managed
    it to find a “smooth” spot but still I hit two good 1-2 feet waves I could not see in this light. After a few big jumps my cub
    finally settled down. But what a great campsite on this huge open sandbar, no bugs, warm and in the nose the
    scent of warm spruce sep. It is barely to describe what I felt when I erected my camp tiered and slow in that big
    empty loneliness and upcoming peacefull quite night.
    I passed Schefferville next day and landed
    at Wabush/Labrador City. This is an iron ore mining city with a huge mining site. There was a big hill they had
    cut rectangular as you would cut cubes out of a big piece of cheese. I fuelled up my tanks and took off again.
    A Canadair water bomber crew verified me that I’ll find sandbars at the Churchill River below Churchill Falls with it’s
    big hydropower plants. Again I arrived in the deep canyon of the river in dawn, landed and sat camp on a nice sandbar.
    Being 1000 miles south of before I have a distinct night now and because I am flying to the east it is sooner. Well, I think
    I have to set camp latest at 6:30 pm not to get to much trouble. I rested for some days and enjoyed fishing. But I got
    only little once. Anyway, they tasted great. One morning well rested I continued and after take off I enjoyed a low
    cruise over the river in it’s deep bed. Finally I arrived at Goose Bay.
    What a huge airport also not with much traffic.
    But I felt like an ant on a big table being pushed around by the controllers because there were bigger
    species to give place. But the people from Esso Aviat FBO were really friendly. The manger kept care that I got
    a missing WAC map # 22 which I could not get because they were sold out by the Canadian publisher. A waterbomber
    crew gave me their worn one.
    When I wanted to take off I became shoved
    around again. Five Swedish fighters for training arrived and I had to wait 15 minutes until they were on ground.
    I felt pretty much lost. In the future, if I can, I for sure will avoid any big international airport, especially after 6 weeks
    flying in uncontrolled airspace and aerodromes. But finally I flew direction Lourdes de Blanc Sablon. Direction N’fenland.
    Looking again for a camp 2 ½ hours later I landed on a big sandbar of the Rivière de St Paul. This river had many nice
    coarse red sand bars. Days later I refueled at Blanc Sablon and will continue flight.
    Blanc de Sablon
    The wandering raven

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