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Thread: exhaust studs and nuts

  1. #1

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    exhaust studs and nuts

    Some of my exhaust studs and nuts are crusted together. If I use stainless studs and nuts will this stop. Thanks teeweed

  2. #2
    behindpropellers's Avatar
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    Just make some long nuts out of brass stock. The ends will not get corroded that way.

    Tim

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    Thanks

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    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Or you can use the factory stainless nuts and studs. STD 1410 516-18 Lycoming exhaust nuts and 31C12 Lycoming exhaust studs.
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers

  5. #5

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    Thanks again!

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    Luke_theDrifter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by behindpropellers
    Just make some long nuts out of brass stock. The ends will not get corroded that way.

    Tim
    This is the craziest thing I've heard of!

    DO NOT use BRASS. Brass is too soft and will NOT take the heat from the exhuast, and then will for SURE twist in half when you take them off after some hours in service.

    Stainless is the way to go, appling liberal amount of anti-sieze to the threads when you put it together seems to helps over the long run also.

  7. #7
    fatcub's Avatar
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    Use a high quality copper anti-seize. Brush a little extra on when tight. Won't completely stop corrosion but will slow it way down.

    Scott..
    PA-12 Fat Cub

  8. #8
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Luke, The small Continentals use brass exhaust nuts.
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers

  9. #9

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    Changed my exhaust gaskets yesterday 7 out of 8 exhaust studs threaded out of the cylinder. I need to find exhaust studs that will stay in the head and nuts that will spin off a year later when working on the exhaust system. Stainless might be the way to go. Thanks teeweed

  10. #10
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Look in the Lycoming parts manual for the part number for the over sized exhaust studs.
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers

  11. #11
    behindpropellers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luke_theDrifter
    Quote Originally Posted by behindpropellers
    Just make some long nuts out of brass stock. The ends will not get corroded that way.

    Tim
    This is the craziest thing I've heard of!
    Probably need to get a life then.

  12. #12
    S2D's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by behindpropellers
    Quote Originally Posted by Luke_theDrifter
    Quote Originally Posted by behindpropellers
    Just make some long nuts out of brass stock. The ends will not get corroded that way.

    Tim
    This is the craziest thing I've heard of!
    Probably need to get a life then.
    I agree with Byron.
    May work great on the little cont's, but anything bigger, they are a pain. We ran them for years on the IO-520's and they were always a problem. We started using those high priced split SS nuts from continental and Have very few problems. I would highly recommend SS.
    I may be wrong but that probably won't stop me from arguing about it.

  13. #13
    SuperCub MD's Avatar
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    I like to see a little rust on my nuts, that way the bastards don't shake loose and fall off. I would never slather anti seize on my nuts, they would probably fall off.

    The brass nuts don't work well on the big engines, they get hot and bell out and are a pain. The split thread ones for the Conts work great, but wrong thread for the Lycs. If you want plain stainless nuts, Lyc will probably sell you some for 20 bucks a nut, or I've heard rumors that the same stainless nut just might be at your local hardware store.

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    Gosh, I have never had a problem on the airplanes that I regularly maintain by using the Lycoming 31C12 series studs and the Lycoming STD1410 nuts. A little anti-seize on the studs, remove the exhaust every year and spray with lube periodically. No problem. The STD1410 nuts are around $1.50 each.

    I have noticed the after-market nuts are softer, tend to round out and are more prone to sticking than the Lycoming nuts. But they are cheaper in the short run.

    Vickie

  15. #15
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tamarack
    I have noticed the after-market nuts are softer, tend to round out and are more prone to sticking than the Lycoming nuts. But they are cheaper in the short run.

    Vickie
    I agree. The ones that Spruce sells are made for Superior. I get mine from Aviall and they are factory Lycoming and seem to be of better quality.
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers

  16. #16
    Clyde and Susan's Avatar
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    Stainless steel nuts on stainless steel bolts will often gall and freeze if you don't use a good quality anti-size in the threads. ...Clyde Davis

  17. #17
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    Of course, one could just helicoil the head, and then it wouldn't matter if the stud comes out with the nut.

    Studs, gaskets, lockwashers & nuts are cheap in the grand scheme of things.

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    Would there be something wrong with using the hi temp lock nuts on your exhaust studs? (not the teflon ring type). Do you guys use thread lock on the exhaust studs or would that be a big no no? Seems if you used thread lock on the studs and antisiezed the nuts you would have less of a problem with backing out studs, I just removed my exhaust and ran into the same problem, I only had two studs back out though. I also noticed that I had a bolt in lieu of a stud in one of my intake ports. The reason for using studs and nuts instead of bolts is to prevent over torquing the threads in exhaust flange and still allow for efficient clamping force (with the nuts) to prevent exhaust leaks ?? are the intake flanges less critical due to less heat? If lock nuts aren't a good option, would split lock washers be more secure than the toothed washers, I had the toothed washers on all my exhaust and intake studs as well as my acc case and oil sump bolts. I don't know why I just don't like them and think the split washers would work better

  19. #19
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    If the exhaust studs keep coming out you might check for cracks. I had that problem before. They do make over sized exhaust studs. Steel lock nuts would be more prone to pulling the studs out do to the friction of a lock nut.
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers

  20. #20
    DesperadoPilot's Avatar
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    What would be wrong with using red loctite on the studs? Just asking.

  21. #21
    behindpropellers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DesperadoPilot View Post
    What would be wrong with using red loctite on the studs? Just asking.
    I doubt it will stand up to the heat. I usually use a torch to soften red loctite.

  22. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Pierce View Post
    Luke, The small Continentals use brass exhaust nuts.
    .......and Gipsy Majors.....

  23. #23

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    I use some stuff from WWII called anti seize. It is really thick and full of graphite. Plus, I make really, really long nuts out of brass hex stock. If your cylinders get hot enough to melt brass, you might have more problems than a few rusty exhaust studs. That said, the Super D has stainless all the way around, and the few times I have had the exhaust oof they have been no problem at all.

  24. #24

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    I'll check for cracks before reinstalling my exhaust, thanks Steve, Are you guys who are using anti seize applying it to the case side of the stud or only to the side with the nut

  25. #25

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    Lycoming STD-1410 nuts with Star lock washers And be sure they are on the correct way the nut has a larger flat surface on one side. Depending on the style of flange (how thick) or how far the studs were put in i add AN washers so when the nut is tight it is flush with the bottom of the stud any threads that stick out past the nut will rust and corroide over time and there is a chance of the stud coming out of the cylinder. I have never used any anti-seeze but do not see what it would hurt to use some Champion spark plug anti-seeze.
    Steve C.

  26. #26
    texmex's Avatar
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    I agree. The ones that Spruce sells are made for Superior. I get mine from Aviall and they are factory Lycoming and seem to be of better quality.
    The problem with Avill, at least in Australia, is that they won't sell to anyone with less then a fleet of turboprops. Availl are owned by Boeing. That leaves Aircraft Spruce as the only practical alternative.

    Any other alternative gratefully received. I'm away at the moment and can't take a look on the aircraft, but I assume there's a flat washer, lock washer and the questionable nut.

    Thanks, Denis.

  27. #27

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    Denis, give me a call have some here if needed.
    John

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    texmex's Avatar
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    PM sent. Thanks.

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