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Thread: Low and Slow

  1. #1
    scout88305's Avatar
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    “We sleep safely in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm.”

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    Seaworthy's Avatar
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    Impressive---out of my league at the moment, but I'm getting there
    Marine Corps Aviation since 1966

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    I have no difficulty landing an airplane as short as that guy…but the airplane would be wrapped up into a tight little ball when I was finished. Good posting Eric!


    Lippy

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    S2D's Avatar
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    for the novice thinking of attempting that kind of landing, I'd recommend a few changes in procedure. Just because the river curves doesn't mean you have to fly a curved approach. A straight approach to the Longest stretch will get you a lot shorter landing. after you get good at that, then you can work on the impressive curved approach

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    This guy could do it..............................

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EmFgN...elated&search=

  6. #6
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    Re: Low and Slow

    Quote Originally Posted by scout88305
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03RM9ROf_EU&NR
    This looks plenty long, the biggest challenge is missing the obstacles once you have touched down. You have to know where your obstacles are from the air because once you get close to the ground in the flare your forward visibility will really decrease, especially on a curve. Keep it slowed up on approach, after touch down watch for obstacles and stay on the rudders!

    Where things get interesting is landing or taking off over ridges. When the landing area is at 3-4000 feet elevation. The landings are usually shorter than the takeoffs. In the air overhead you can see the entire length of the landing area. But during takeoffs (or landings) sometimes you only have a forward view of 100 to 300 feet that is constantly changing as you go over the crest. I don't know about you but my cub (150hp) with a load can use up 600-800 feet or more at those elevations for takeoff. Don’t forget to lean before taking off, a guy wants every rpm he can get. Short strips and even a slight tailwind is bad business also.
    I learned the hard way, didn’t bend anything but scared myself. I have only taken off downwind on a short strip at altitude one time. I was at 3000 feet elevation, gross weight, and 450 feet maximum takeoff length available. We had to takeoff down hill due to rising terrain that we couldn’t out climb. We (2 Super Cubs) had been at this place for 3 days. The wind was always the wrong direction except for a short calm period some mornings. The fourth morning came and we had most of our stuff packed except the tents and the wind was still the wrong direction. If we had to stay another day there was no sense in taking them down. We waited for the wind to stop or change direction. It finally let up and we broke down the tents. Just as we finished packing a little breeze began to hit our face from the wrong direction. We agreed that it was only 2-3 mph and was going to get worse if we waited. I reminded my friend about leaning and letting it roll to the last foot available before lifting off. There was a small drainage of water at our rotation point that dropped off into a creek. The edge of that wet spot would be our lift off point. I fired up the cub, did my run up, leaned the engine for maximum rpm and smoothness. Then proceeded on the take off roll, at the edge of the wet spot I pulled flaps, rotated briefly and then pushed the stick forward to stay in ground effect. The cub lifted off but just wallowed (I don’t like wallowing cubs) into the air and barely flew down slope until I picked up a few mph. My buddy was a little lighter and did just fine. We knew better but let things cloud our judgement because we wanted to get home. Experience isn't gained by sitting at home. Some times a guy just has to learn the hard way! Pete

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    Seaworthy's Avatar
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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yoeDC...elated&search=

    Glad I don't carry this guys insurance!!!! Looks like Australia
    Marine Corps Aviation since 1966

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