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Thread: Good book for those who have time to read

  1. #161

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    Quote Originally Posted by Skywalker View Post
    Gordon, one reviewer called it a combat diary, so no. He also wrote 7 Came Through about surviving in a life raft with 6 others after a crash. His memoirs include some good stories about travelling the country as a car manufacturers' rep, learning how to deal with machinery. The only way he got into pilot training without a college degree was his mechanical experience.Later while traveling the world meeting world figures he would find he knew people everywhere from past lives.
    "Rickenbacker: An Autobiography" or just "Rickenbacker". I seem to recall that my copy was "Rickenbacker" but that may have just been the cover and not the formal title.

    Devoured that book when I was a youngster...the old man met Mr. Rickenbacker somewhere along the line and gave me the book to read.

    Ranges from his early days of an apprentice mechanic, to race driver to WWI pilot to Eastern Airlines.

    Some vignettes:
    - After some early job, had some $$ in his pocket, bought his girl a diamond ring not knowing what that meant;
    - His recollections of taking better care of his aircraft engine and machine guns during WWI so that they were more dependable;
    - He credited his mental toughness for surviving both his offshore ditching (and the long period awaiting rescue) and his severe injuries after a landside EA crash;
    - Stories of the early days of EA and competing with (among others) Braniff and offering to carry mail for "$0.000"
    - Taking a customer demonstration / test ride in a DC-??? aircraft with his entire management team and suggesting a slow and gentle return to the field when the fuselage walls were rhythmically flexing in flight.

    Amazon has copies in hardback.

  2. #162

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    Yes, his wiki makes many ref to "Rickenbacker".
    What's a go-around?

  3. #163
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
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    Reread this excellent book detailing Fred Weick's life as an aeronautical engineer: https://www.amazon.com/GROUND-UP-Fre.../dp/0874749506

    Follows the history of aircraft development and gives some background on propellers, engine cowling, tricycle landing gear, various safety improvements, the Ercoupe, and many years at Piper designing some of their fleet.

    Those were different times and thinking outside the box was encouraged.

    Gary
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  4. #164

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    Along those lines, More Than My Share by Kelly Johnson, director of the Lockheed Skunk Works. I haven't read it, but I did read one by his successor which takes you thru stealth and how devilishly hard it is to achieve stealth.
    What's a go-around?
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  5. #165

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    Not cub or small airplane related, but quite a story.
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  6. #166

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    Nice to see this thread still going. Don't miss Richard Holm's Bound For The Backcountry. He now has two volumes out. The first focuses on central Idaho and has become the definitive reference book for Idaho backcountry aviation history. The second focuses on the Hell's Canyon country and history. They are both great books, but it is probably better to read the first volume first. It gives a great base and background.

  7. #167

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    Runway Dust
    by Charles R Furden
    About Utah central in the 1950's, j3's, spray planes, people. Interesting book.

  8. #168
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    I received a great gift the other day. One of my customers is the son of a farmer named Charlie and his wife Rose. I first meet Charlie back in 1974 when I was up here visting. He had a cow with a twisted stomach and needed help flipping the cow over with the old rope trick ( consult Rick Papp for info ) Charlie was a sly humerous old codger and I liked him right away. We would bump into each other a few times a year and iritate each other. We became good friends. Charlie and Rose grew up on a farm on Long Island NY and then moved North in the late 60s. I knew that Rose and Charlie had both raced motorbikes in enduros in the 60s. Charlie died about 15 years ago in his late 70s and Rose passed a few years ago in her 80s. Both loved life and were missed by many after they were gone. So...back to their son Bill. Bill comes in my shop the other day and says " I have some things of mom and dad's that you might want " he brings in a box of books that they both had read, it was a box of how to fly airplane books. Bill told me his mom and dad had taken flying lessons and that his mom had soloed. That they had gone a couple times to the Rhinebeck Aerodrome years back. Some of you know that I volunteered at the Aerodrome from 98 to 03. The only time that I meet Cole Palen was in 92 when I took my son and a few friends to watch the show. Cole died in 93 and I have regretting not hanging around the Aerodrome when Cole was still alive. I get digging in the box of books and find a cope of Gordon Bainbridge's book The Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome. Something that I had just never gotten around to aquiring. Felt like Christmas



    And then I opened the cover



    Priceless!

    Glenn
    Last edited by cubdriver2; 04-18-2017 at 09:03 PM.
    "Optimism is going after Moby Dick in a rowboat and taking the tartar sauce with you!"

  9. #169
    cubdriver2's Avatar
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    I received a great gift the other day. One of my customers is the son of a farmer named Charlie and his wife Rose. I first meet Charlie back in 1974 when I was up here visting. He had a cow with a twisted stomach and needed help flipping the cow over with the old rope trick ( consult Rick Papp for info ) Charlie was a sly humerous old codger and I liked him right away. We would bump into each other a few times a year and iritate each other. We became good friends. Charlie and Rose grew up on a farm on Long Island NY and then moved North in the late 60s. I knew that Rose and Charlie had both raced motorbikes in enduros in the 60s. Charley died about 15 years ago in his late 70s and Rose passed a few years ago in her 80s. Both loved life and were missed by many after they were gone. So...back to their son Bill. Bill comes in my shop the other day and says " I have some things of mom and dad's that you might want " he brings in a box of books that they both had read, it was a box of how to fly airplane books. Bill told me his mom and dad had taken flying lessons and that his mom had soled. That they had gone a couple times to the Rhinebeck Aerodrome years back. Some of you know that I volunteered at the Aerodrome from 98 to 03. The only time that I meet Cole Palen was in 92 when I took my son and a few friends to watch the show. Cole died in 93 and I have regretting not hanging around the Aerodrome when Cole was still alive. I get digging in the box of books and find a cope of Gordon Bainbridge's book The Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome. Something that I had just never gotten around to aquiring. Felt like Christmas



    And then I opened the cover



    Priceless!

    Glenn
    "Optimism is going after Moby Dick in a rowboat and taking the tartar sauce with you!"

  10. #170
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    I just started reading Rinker Buck's new book "Life on the Mississippi". Most of us have read Flight of Passage, if you have not read Oregon Trail also by Rinker it is a good one. Life on the Mississippi starts out with some pretty interesting history lessons (as did Oregon trail) about how we got out of the North East.

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    P.S. the "for those who have time to read" part of this means it will take me about three months to read this book. It has been crazy here!
    "Often Mistaken, but Never in Doubt"
    ------------------------------------------

  11. #171
    Gordon Misch's Avatar
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    There is this version too.

    Gordon

    N4328M KTDO

  12. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon Misch View Post
    There is this version too.
    Certainly the inspiration for him taking a flatboat down the river!
    "Often Mistaken, but Never in Doubt"
    ------------------------------------------

  13. #173
    Gordon Misch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SJ View Post
    Certainly the inspiration for him taking a flatboat down the river!
    Well, I purchased both. I delight both in Mark Twain and the Buck brothers. Should be fun reading.
    Gordon

    N4328M KTDO

  14. #174
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Usually takes me forever to read a book but quite the opposite with Fighter Pilot by Robin Olds. Couldn't put it down. All he wanted to do was fly and sabotaged his own career so he could. True maverick and a great read from WWII ace in P38s and P51 to F4s in Vietnam.
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    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers
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  15. #175
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Pierce View Post
    Usually takes me forever to read a book but quite the opposite with Fighter Pilot by Robin Olds. Couldn't put it down. All he wanted to do was fly and sabotaged his own career so he could. True maverick and a great read from WWII ace in P38s and P51 to F4s in Vietnam.
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    Imagine being on the cutting edge of aviation fighter technology, going from mustangs and p-38’s to f-4’s all in combat. It was a great book. I’ve been listening to audible a lot when driving. Seems like that’s my only free time. A lot of good flying books on there


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  16. #176
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    I liked how he got checked out in the P80.
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers

  17. #177
    flybynite's Avatar
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    Haven't seen this one mentioned and don't recall where I heard of it. Easy read.

    "My part of the sky" Roland Beamont

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  18. #178
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    Did Wally Fisk ever get a Typhoon? That man had the coolest toys.

    Web
    Life's tough . . . wear a cup.

  19. #179

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    There’s a Typhoon project in the UK, but I think the answer must be «*no*» because there hasn’t been an airworthy Typhoon since about 1947


    Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org
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  20. #180
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    I recently began reading “A Thousand Trails Home” by Seth Kantner. It’s a biographical account of life near Ambler, AK and illustrates the important role that caribou play in the lives of subsistence hunters in that part of Alaska. He’s a great writer and the book is full of beautiful photos. He’s written several other books, include “Shopping for Porcupines” and “Ordinary Wolves,” and I can recommend them, too.

    “A Thousand Trails Home” led me to the online biography of Oliver Cameron, found at olivercameron.org. It’s a really interesting account of a family of gussuks moving to the Kobuk region. If you read either book you’ll come away with an appreciation for how tough and resourceful you need to be if you’re going to live in the bush. Definitely much, much harder than you might think.
    Speedo
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  21. #181

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    I am in the midst of this book and can also recommend it for content. As well, it is a beautiful book in terms of print and pictures.

    Quote Originally Posted by Speedo View Post
    I recently began reading “A Thousand Trails Home” by Seth Kantner. It’s a biographical account of life near Ambler, AK and illustrates the important role that caribou play in the lives of subsistence hunters in that part of Alaska. He’s a great writer and the book is full of beautiful photos. He’s written several other books, include “Shopping for Porcupines” and “Ordinary Wolves,” and I can recommend them, too.

    “A Thousand Trails Home” led me to the online biography of Oliver Cameron, found at olivercameron.org. It’s a really interesting account of a family of gussuks moving to the Kobuk region. If you read either book you’ll come away with an appreciation for how tough and resourceful you need to be if you’re going to live in the bush. Definitely much, much harder than you might think.

  22. #182
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    Probably one of the best Vietnam war books I've read is "Dead Men Flying" by Michael Mullane. A4's and F8 (escorts) off the USS Oriskany in the 1967 - 68 time frame. Carrier Air Wing 16 had more losses than any other CAW in the war.
    "The sword of freedom is kept sharp by those who live on it's edge." - Scott Adams

  23. #183
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    Quote Originally Posted by Willie View Post
    Probably one of the best Vietnam war books I've read is "Dead Men Flying" by Michael Mullane. A4's and F8 (escorts) off the USS Oriskany in the 1967 - 68 time frame. Carrier Air Wing 16 had more losses than any other CAW in the war.
    THAT is a GREAT book! Talk about tough duty….. A must read.

    MTV

  24. #184
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    Cathy got me her cousin's book Diary of An Aerospace Whistleblower: The Ultrasonic Research Story for Christmas. Fascinating book to me and I read it in 2 days. Hit home with me in several ways, some people's ethics and the behavior of some of pour government employees. With as much military and commercial aviation manufacturing in the Dallas Ft. Worth metromess I have dealt with some of the players and use the company that picked up the pieces in the aftermath for magnaflux work. Not for everyone but an easy read and I found it very interesting.

    Reading Lucky 666 right now. Having read a lot on B17s bombing in Europe and a lot of books on the Pacific theater this covers the B26 Marauders and B17s in the Pacific theater. Even has a blurb on the cover from Rinker Buck.
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers
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  25. #185
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Visited my folks after Christmas and they are both avid readers. Was telling my Dad how much I like the Robin Olds book so he sent me home with a couple of Navy versions.
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    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers

  26. #186
    Steve's Aircraft (Brian)'s Avatar
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    https://www.amazon.com/Smokejumper-G...s%2C162&sr=8-1

    One of our good friends. Lee keeps his SuperCub just to the South of our hanger.

    Brian
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  27. #187
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    Steve Pierce, Ch 26 of "Last of the Gunfighters" is a harrowing story of my friend Ron Luther getting keelhauled by the Enterprise. He and the airplane went through the screws which chopped up the airplane. The Captain of the Enterprise was not happy.
    "The sword of freedom is kept sharp by those who live on it's edge." - Scott Adams
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  28. #188
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    Quote Originally Posted by Willie View Post
    Steve Pierce, Ch 26 of "Last of the Gunfighters" is a harrowing story of my friend Ron Luther getting keelhauled by the Enterprise. He and the airplane went through the screws which chopped up the airplane. The Captain of the Enterprise was not happy.
    I suspect Luther wasn’t very happy, either.
    Speedo

  29. #189

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    “Into The Mouth Of The Cat” is one of the top 5 books I’ve ever read and I read a lot. It’s a biography of Lance P. Sijan who was a USAF Phantom pilot, Vietnam POW and MOH recipient (posthumously).
    Be prepared to be moved emotionally as you read about his resilience and shear mental will power during his survival, evasion, resistance & escape after being downed over North Vietnam. After reading this book, you will have a renewed appreciation for those who volunteer to serve in our country’s military services.
    The USAF awards the Sijan Leadership award annually to those who best demonstrate the highest qualities of leadership in their job and life.
    Attachment 64290
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