Results 1 to 26 of 26

Thread: 15 year old curious about flying

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    2
    Post Thanks / Like

    15 year old curious about flying

    Hi, I am a 15 year old girl who lives in Katy, Texas who's interested in taking flight lessons. My father and I were told by a pilot to go for lessons at a school called, The Flight School, located in Cypress, Texas. My father contacted them asking for a price for lessons and they said it would be about 7500 dollars. We are not sure what is included with by paying 7500 dollars but do you think it's a fair price? And does NASA have any pilot related jobs? Thank you for taking the time reading this.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Posts
    815
    Post Thanks / Like
    You've come to the right place for information about flying lessons. The quoted price is about the same for attaining a private pilot's license as in Canada, where I have been flying small aircraft for 62 years. As for NASA, my advice to you is if you want something badly---and careers in aviation for women are expanding rapidly---if you dream of anything, talk of it, plan for it, it will happen. The only question is what you're prepared to sacrifice to get it. Go for it!
    Thanks Glazeddonuts thanked for this post

  3. #3
    aktango58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    18AA
    Posts
    7,991
    Post Thanks / Like
    $7,500 sounds like a total for aircraft, instructor and study materials; not far off I would bet.

    NASA I believe recruits from the Air Force, and yes they have some pilots among their ranks.

    At 15 you can begin, and each of the next few birthdays can be celebrated with check rides for additional certificates. Starting young and being focused will give great benefits.

    There are quite a few members not real far from you, and some great flying activities. We all desire the younger generation to continue the flying traditions, so efforts towards getting your wings will be supported strongly.

    Welcome, and where do I find the donuts?
    I don't know where you've been me lad, but I see you won first Prize!
    Thanks Glazeddonuts thanked for this post

  4. #4
    Gordon Misch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Toledo, Wa (KTDO)
    Posts
    2,553
    Post Thanks / Like
    As a recently retired high school teacher, I'll say this:

    If you have a dream, a goal, focus on doing all of the hard work (sometimes drudge work) required to realize it. It's worth it. You write well, so you've taken your education seriously so far. Take the hard classes - all the math available at your school, and physics. Then in a year or two start looking seriously at post secondary educational opportunities. Perhaps a military academy (don't overlook Coast Guard if you're interested in flying helos), or perhaps an aviation-specific university program. My understanding is that the airlines want a four-year degree at this time. If you want to fly for NASA, consider a degree (and probably an advanced degree) in math, physics, engineering, etc. And go for test pilot school.

    And - - - sorry to say this, but - - - keep your grades up. They matter. I wish I had understood that earlier in life.

    Bottom line, GO FOR IT!!!!! Do whatever it takes.
    Gordon

    N4328M KTDO
    My SPOT: tinyurl.com/N4328M (case sensitive)
    Thanks Glazeddonuts thanked for this post
    Likes RaisedByWolves, Pete Schoeninger liked this post

  5. #5
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK.
    Posts
    317
    Post Thanks / Like
    Just do it. Some of us that are older wish we had done it earlier...some of us wish we still could as well as before. Have some fun in aviation like we have.

    Gary
    Thanks Glazeddonuts thanked for this post

  6. #6
    Scouter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Exeter Maine
    Posts
    1,479
    Post Thanks / Like
    A couple of ways to approach it. I was fortunate enough to have a Dad with a plane who let me learn to fly in it. Sounds like that is not your case. I think you and your dad should buy a decent 150 Cessna for you to learn in and get your tickets then selll it.

    That might be a little more than your Dad would like to bite off. Sometimes you can lease your airplane back to your airport, but I have never seen that work very well.

    If I had to do it over, I wouldn't go the conventional route of dragging it out over a year. I would find a some time and go to one of the flight schools and get it done over the course of 2-3 weeks. It will still probably cost you the same money, but you will have it done.

    You have reached out to a great group here. Someone will come up with a winning idea for you. It's impressive to me that you are thinking this way. There are lots of worse things a 15 year old girl can be thinking of doing instead of flying around in little planes. Somebody it Texas, get her in the back of a cub.

    Jim
    Thanks Glazeddonuts thanked for this post

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Meanwhile,...
    Posts
    4,191
    Post Thanks / Like
    My daughter's tee shirt says "Chicks Fly!" She started ground school at the local Community College here in Tulsa at 16 and completed her private pilot certificate at 17 during her junior year using an independent instructor and various rental aircraft. Today she is now a senior in college earning majors in Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering and is continuing with her flying. Funny thing her instructor had several high school students and he always said the girls made the best students.

    If what you were quoted is materials and instruction through Private Pilot Certificate it is about what we/she spent and if it is part of your plan it is education money well spent.

    I fly into your area on business some, have landed at Katie but usually at Brenham and while a bit further I noticed it has good flight training activity and a friendly atmosphere that might be worth a look if you don't like the school at Cypress. Unfortunately, your local airport Houston Exec. is really just a busy business aircraft destination and I never saw or heard evidence of primary instruction there.

    The key is to find a learning environment/instructor that works for YOU and your parents. Most all schools will do a low cost or free discovery flight to give you an introduction and you might also want to look into the local EAA Chapter for support advice/guidance on schools and instructors in the area.

    Fall and winter are great flying months in South Texas, good luck!
    Last edited by OLDCROWE; 08-04-2017 at 07:35 AM.
    "Don't feed the hipsters"
    Thanks Glazeddonuts thanked for this post
    Likes Farmboy liked this post

  8. #8

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    117
    Post Thanks / Like
    Look into joining your local chapter of the Ninety Nines, an international organization for women pilots. They have several programs and scholarships available to help with the cost of learning to fly. My niece got one for $3300 to help with the cost of getting her Sport Pilot ticket, and one of my young eagles got several scholarships that helped her afford getting her private and instrument ratings.

    Here is a link to their website. https://www.ninety-nines.org/
    Thanks Glazeddonuts thanked for this post

  9. #9
    SJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Kansas City, USA
    Posts
    13,262
    Post Thanks / Like
    $7500 would be the low end these days, and it assumes you will do only 40 hours of flying and receive 20 hours of dual instruction (the legal minimums). I have completed a number of students in this time frame, but they were able to commit to flying every week (at least once). If you can't fly every week, it will likely take more hours so will increase the price somewhat. I usually tell folks $8500 around here.

    Also, finding "the cheapest" way to do it is not always the best way, make sure the instructors and airplanes are in good shape wherever you go - read the google and other reviews, etc.

    sj
    "Often Mistaken, but Never in Doubt"
    ------------------------------------------
    Thanks Glazeddonuts thanked for this post

  10. #10
    mvivion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Bozeman,MT
    Posts
    9,227
    Post Thanks / Like
    SJ pretty well nailed it. Also, keep in mind that the minimum age for soloing a powered airplane is sixteen. You take dual instruction at fifteen, though. Go visit a few schools in your area, if there are more than one, and see what sense you get of each ones operation. Just common sense here, you need not be an expert to get a basic sense of who has a decent program. Ask for a list of their former students, and talk to a few of them.

    That $7500 is likely a "minimum" cost to private pilot. I've told folks to plan for between $7000 and $10000, but a LOT of that is going to depend on you. If you come to each lesson we'll prepared, homework done, and understanding what will happen on each lesson, you'll advance quickly. If, on the other hand, if you come to each lesson with the " teach me" attitude, things will go slower and cost more.

    Finally, there are a lot of folks on this forum who live in Texas. Connecting with some of them will help by providing mentors to help you through the rough spots.

    NASA does hire pilots, both military and civilian. Most have advanced degrees in STEM fields. Study hard, and you can go most anywhere you want to go.

    MTV
    Thanks Glazeddonuts thanked for this post
    Likes Speedo liked this post

  11. #11

    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Platinum
    Posts
    166
    Post Thanks / Like
    Miss Glazeddonuts.... from a grandpa's perspective I'm certain many here ponder, what words or advice will insure this young lady fulfills her goal or dream of earning her pilots license? Do not allow anything to stop you, do not make or use any excuse to prevent or delay you from attaining your goal! If you do you'll be just like me. I dreamt of flying for years...didn't earn my pilots license until I was a bald grandpa. Just imagine all the adventures I didn't have. Tell you what.. ask your dad to send me a PM. I'll pay for an hour or three.



    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Thanks Glazeddonuts thanked for this post
    Likes Speedo, Steve-N1964S liked this post

  12. #12

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    283
    Post Thanks / Like
    Hi Katy,

    A few points to add:

    1) don't pay upfront for the flight training - most schools charge as you go for books, classroom lessons, flying, fees etc. Sometimes you might get a discount for paying for 10 hours upfront, but I am always wary.
    2) I learned to fly in 38 hours and then instructed for a while. The wealthiest students were the worst - would arrive Sunday morning, no preparation from the week before, distracted and then expect me to teach. I read every book I could, read and understood every lesson plan for the next flight - so by the time we went flying, the instructor would demonstrate the exercise, then I would practice a few times, and then we would move on to the next lesson.
    3) Set a pace and then keep with it - allow enough time to prepare for the next lesson, but if you do it too slowly you take two steps forward and one back overtime.
    4) there are several local airports near me with flying schools - one is 5 minutes flying to get to the training area, one is 20 minutes each way. So in an hour, you get 50 minutes training in an hour, the other you get 20 minutes. Not hard to see which one is going to take longer.

    Don
    Thanks Glazeddonuts thanked for this post
    Likes Pete Schoeninger liked this post

  13. #13
    WhiskeyMike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    West Boxford MA
    Posts
    725
    Post Thanks / Like
    If you want to be the best pilot you can be, I personally recommend that you start in a glider (sailplane) You can actually fly one solo at age 14, but that's not the issue. Flying a glider will teach you how to really fly and make good judgments. Another option is to find flight instruction from someone with a Piper J-3 Cub or Aeronca Champ. This is also an excellent way to really learn the basics, not just get a license. You might spend a little more than buying a package, but since you appear to be truly interested, you'll receive a lot of benefit. Check around on-line or maybe someone here will speak up with a local reference near Houston. I was lucky enough to come form a flying family - both Mom and dad, and my parents started an aviation business in 1952 with a $200 war surplus Boeing Stearman.... My opinion only.

    Happy landings!

    Aviad 1952.png
    Thanks Glazeddonuts thanked for this post
    Likes cubscout, Speedo, super stol liked this post

  14. #14

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,236
    Post Thanks / Like
    Well, Whiskey Mike beat me to the suggestion. There are a couple of soaring operations near Katy, here are a couple links:

    http://www.scoh.org/ https://www.houstonsoaring.org/

    Most soaring clubs genuinely enjoy having aspiring young pilots around. Some will help defray expenses by serving as line crew, pushing gliders into position, connecting to tow rope, that sort of thing. And there's a lot of "free" learning to be had by just being around the operation, seeing how the pro's do it, and seeing rookie mistakes. There's some real learning benefit by hanging out with a bunch of adults that aren't your teachers, and aren't your family, but who will treat you with respect and support if you comport yourself well. Some of the best professional pilots I know got started that way, and some are still passing that along.

    Best wishes, and keep us all informed, no matter what direction you choose to take.

    Thanks. cubscout
    Thanks Glazeddonuts thanked for this post
    Likes super stol liked this post

  15. #15
    WhiskeyMike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    West Boxford MA
    Posts
    725
    Post Thanks / Like
    Most soaring clubs genuinely enjoy having aspiring young pilots around. Some will help defray expenses by serving as line crew, pushing gliders into position, connecting to tow rope, that sort of thing. And there's a lot of "free" learning to be had by just being around the operation, seeing how the pro's do it, and seeing rookie mistakes. There's some real learning benefit by hanging out with a bunch of adults that aren't your teachers, and aren't your family, but who will treat you with respect and support if you comport yourself well. Some of the best professional pilots I know got started that way, and some are still passing that along.

    Best wishes, and keep us all informed, no matter what direction you choose to take.

    Thanks. cubscout[/QUOTE]

    Yeah, yeah. Exactly so. No substitution for time and osmosis. As a former line boy, I say, "No grease, no gain."

    So much learning, fun, and great adventures lie ahead!
    Thanks Glazeddonuts thanked for this post

  16. #16

    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    2
    Post Thanks / Like
    Wow! Wasn't expecting so many wonderful responses. Thank you so much for responding and giving me amazing advice!

  17. #17
    cubdriver2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    upstate NY
    Posts
    7,707
    Post Thanks / Like
    Last edited by cubdriver2; 08-08-2017 at 02:42 PM.
    "Optimism is going after Moby Dick in a rowboat and taking the tartar sauce with you!"
    Likes DavePA11 liked this post

  18. #18
    fobjob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Salt Lake City, Utah
    Posts
    1,911
    Post Thanks / Like
    The optimum learning period is to fly EVERY OTHER DAY.....any different will increase the hours needed and the costs, as well....

  19. #19

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Posts
    815
    Post Thanks / Like
    No question that irregular training increases costs. Every other day may be beyond the reach of many students. From my experience, thinking on the ground of the previous flight was as valuable as that lesson itself, and the shorter time the better to apply that thinking in the air.

  20. #20
    WhiskeyMike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    West Boxford MA
    Posts
    725
    Post Thanks / Like
    You also learn from watching others, which can actually only be done at a small airfield, better yet at a glider club, where you'll be on the field working and helping others. Another option, is a small airstrip with the least amount of steel fencing, and the most number of pilots spending time there. Also see about the EAA and youth programs at a local chapter. Want to fly for NASA, learn about building planes, and what makes them tick. You'll love it and meet some great people. www.eaa.org.
    Likes cubscout liked this post

  21. #21

    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    136
    Post Thanks / Like
    A great book, one of the best the FAA put out, the last chapter 17 is real good www.avstop.com/ac/flighttrainghandbook/

  22. #22
    C130jake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    252
    Post Thanks / Like
    I know Civil Air Patrol gets a bad rap sometimes in the search and rescue world but I was a cadet and went to solo encampment at 16 and soloed in four days. Learned about airplanes and got five or so free orientation rides. Try to find a squadron that focuses on the aerospace education more than the marching around if you can.

    We gave C130 rides to cadets in my reserve unit a few times a year. I haven't been a member in 20 years so I may be out of touch.

    http://www.gocivilairpatrol.com

    Jake




    Sent from my iPad using SuperCub.Org

  23. #23
    Scouter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Exeter Maine
    Posts
    1,479
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mark_Moyle has a really great idea. I will sign up for 2 hours of training as well. I would be thrilled to help out in some small way, and I would bet Im not alone. You can email me at jimcrane04435@gmail.com when you get started, and I will work it out with the instructor. Now your at 4 hours for free, lets see where it goes. Good luck, looking forward to seeing your pix beside your plane.

    Jim
    Likes Mark_Moyle, Steve-N1964S liked this post

  24. #24
    BradleyG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    138
    Post Thanks / Like



    Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org mobile app
    If the pilot fears to test his skills with the elements, he has chosen the wrong profession.....Lindbergh
    Likes supercub1999, DENNY, Pete Schoeninger liked this post

  25. #25
    cubdriver2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    upstate NY
    Posts
    7,707
    Post Thanks / Like
    Stick n Rudder is a great book after you have been flying for awhile. I think the simplicity of the Machado's book is a great book for learning the basics.

    Glenn
    "Optimism is going after Moby Dick in a rowboat and taking the tartar sauce with you!"
    Likes Pete Schoeninger liked this post

  26. #26

    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    13
    Post Thanks / Like
    A couple of thoughts if I may. Possibly you could get a job at a local airport. I do no think there is a better way to "break in" to aviation than that. I started washing airplanes when I was 14, and 30 years later was the airport manager and part owner of the FBO at Waukesha, WI. for twelve years. Several entry level people that I hired became airline pilots, corporate pilots, etc. They washed airplanes, plowed snow, became pilots, then flight instructors, then charter pilots.... Starting positions for a very young person like you is sometimes dirty work , but lots of fun too. If you wish message me at pete.harriet@gmail.com
    Likes cubscout liked this post

Similar Threads

  1. just curious
    By dplunkt in forum Cafe Supercub
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 02-04-2013, 09:06 PM
  2. I'm flying *this* to NH next year!
    By Jon B. in forum Cafe Supercub
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 08-17-2011, 07:35 AM
  3. Merry christmas and safe flying all year
    By fireball111 in forum Sportsman's Den
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12-24-2006, 05:23 AM

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •