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Thread: N9460D 'A' model Super Cub

  1. #81
    AirPigz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MainlandCub View Post
    Yeah, I like that scheme too. I masked this from the Piper drawing available from the Cub Club. I changed it a bit by reducing the size of the registration letters, carrying the stripe past the rego and leaving the scribble off the fin and rudder. This one is a PA-18A too.

    Andrew.
    ZK-BOX looks really nice. I like the idea of reducing the size of the registration numbers like you did... just enough to soften their impact some but not so much that it's obvious that they've been changed. I might do the same.

    I'm considering taking that small stripe and carrying it around the rear window rather than flying it on past the window. I haven't done any drawing yet to prove that it looks good but it seems like a good idea. It will essentially just outline all the glass that way.

    And for me, I really like the scribble on the tail, but was considering giving it a slight design change to make it a little more dynamic. The changes would be small enough that you won't realize it's different than original, but hopefully it would look more impressive.

    Thanx again for the brake pedal info!

    Martt

  2. #82
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    I built a simple jig for putting the set in some leading edge skins today. Worked great!

    It's just some 3/4" OSB cut 11.75" high by 58", supported by some 2x4 braces that put the OSB at a slight angle. I used 2" schedule 40 pvc pipe, which is 2.375" in outside diameter. The OSB is spaced right at the pipe diameter at the bottom of the trough (floor level) and about 1-1/2" wider at the top where the aluminum first enters. I'm working in a loft area of a hangar that has an OSB subfloor, so I simply screwed the braces directly to the floor and then the OSB trough walls are just laying against the braces with no fasteners so there's no risk of damaging the aluminum as it slides down.

    Takes just a few seconds for a person at each end of the pipe to carefully push down, watching a few marks on the aluminum and working carefully, to put the bend in the nose.

    The whole thing went far better than I expected... in fact, couldn't have gone any better. I got one section of the new leading edge installed then, and the nose radius seemed to be just perfect.

    20170411_105252.jpg

    20170411_105617.jpg

    20170411_105736.jpg

    20170411_161939.jpg
    (this pic is displaying upside down - don't know why)

    20170411_162038.jpg

    20170411_162553.jpg

    Martt Clupper
    Warsaw, Indiana
    1959 PA-18A
    N9460D
    Last edited by AirPigz; 04-11-2017 at 09:54 PM.

  3. #83
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    Aileron hinge question:

    I pulled the old fabric off the right wing and hope to blast on thru it fairly quickly now that I've got one behind me. The left wing got 3 new leading edge sections, new tip ribs (full and nose) along with new tip bow, new cables, and the Wip 2,000# mods.

    On the right wing, the middle aileron hinge (with the horn) has an issue and it needs removed and repaired/replaced. Does anyone have experience with removing the 4 rivets that attach it thru the spar and to the horn? Is there a legal way to do that and re-install it with Cherry Max rivets?

    I appreciate any input -

    Aileron Hinge 1.jpg

    Martt Clupper
    Warsaw, Indiana
    1959 PA-18A
    N9460D


  4. #84
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Those are steel rivets. I drill them out , make my repairs, blast, prime paint and shoot four new rivets in. Univair has them.
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers
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  5. #85
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    I drill out the rivets in the upper and lower gusset, remove the trailing edge and spread out the two ribs to gain access to the 4 steel rivets attaching the aileron bellcrank/hinge to the aileron spar. Note that these are AN455 rivets and they are 3/32" not 1/8" like they appear from the head.
    20170423_081215.jpg
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
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  6. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Pierce View Post
    I drill out the rivets in the upper and lower gusset, remove the trailing edge and spread out the two ribs to gain access to the 4 steel rivets attaching the aileron bellcrank/hinge to the aileron spar. Note that these are AN455 rivets and they are 3/32" not 1/8" like they appear from the head.
    20170423_081215.jpg
    Thanx for the help... makes sense : )

    Martt

  7. #87

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    [/QUOTE]


    My -18 "A" was rebuilt by Pete Sanders in Helena, MT. after a wreck and I flew it back to Fairbanks in September 1987. I did the following: Light electricals and battery; bare panel and interior; Atlee Dodge simple baggage; stock 150 engine and 80/40 prop; stock fuel; Hendricks squared tips and ailerons at stock Cub span; flap gap seals over flaps and ailerons; flaps extended into fuselage; VG's on wings; stock Cub wing rigging. Weighed 1087# but could have been lighter with a lighter fabric job and stock wings. Would fly down to 28 GPS under cruise power in level flight. Next time I'd leave the wing stock but did like the aileron seals, and VG's especially on floats.

    [/QUOTE]

    Interesting to hear about Pete Sanders, he just passed away last summer at around 92 y.o. up until a few years ago he's come out to the airport everyday and sit and watch the goings on. I bought the pa-12 project I am about to finish up from Pete and just bought a PA-18A project from his estate, N9935D. Small world (but I'd hate to paint it.
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  8. #88
    BC12D-4-85's Avatar
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    Pete was an airplane enthusiast and fine gentleman. I'm saddened to hear of his passing. His life and work will continue in the planes and people he knew.

    Gary
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  9. #89

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    Quote Originally Posted by BC12D-4-85 View Post
    Pete was an airplane enthusiast and fine gentleman. I'm saddened to hear of his passing. His life and work will continue in the planes and people he knew.

    Gary
    Yes a good guy for sure and enthusiast doesn't quite capture his passion. I wasn't aware of his 18A I do know he did a 12 that ended up in AK as well.
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  10. #90
    AirPigz's Avatar
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    Does anyone know for certain what year this version of the Piper logo was first used?

    InShot_20170526_170050501-1.jpg

    Btw, started fabric last Friday and got both stabs, both flaps, both ailerons, both gear legs and the rudder covered (and stitched where applicable) but still have the tapes to install. Using the Stewart System and all is going well so far.

    Martt
    1959 PA-18A
    N9460D
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  11. #91
    AirPigz's Avatar
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    Ok, so I have it confirmed that the Piper name in that style of script was in use in 1959, so I have taken that as a base and built up 'Super Cub' in that letter style to put on the project airplane. I don't think the airplanes came out of the factory with this specific graphic on the airplane, but that's ok... not looking to be 100% authentic, just authentic to the age.

    I was unable to locate a version of "Super Cub' that was using this exact style. There's one close, but it's clearly not the exact style as the 'Piper', so I made my own last night and this morning.

    This pic shows what I came up with. Still a little rough on the edges, but I'll clean that up and eventually have some vinyl stencils made.

    Logo Super Cub Black and Red.png

    Let me know what ya think...

    Martt
    N9460D
    Last edited by AirPigz; 05-28-2017 at 05:25 AM.
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  12. #92

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    Martt, I like your ideas. Aerographics has most if not all of the Piper logos as stock items, either as high quality vinyl stick-ons in just about any colour, or as paint masks. They can also do custom stuff if that matters. Many folks on here have dealt with them, I'm a very satisfied customer.

    www.aergraphics.com

    Please show us how it comes out, looking forward to this.

    Thanks. cubscout
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  13. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by cubscout View Post
    Martt, I like your ideas. Aerographics has most if not all of the Piper logos as stock items, either as high quality vinyl stick-ons in just about any colour, or as paint masks. They can also do custom stuff if that matters. Many folks on here have dealt with them, I'm a very satisfied customer.

    www.aerographics.com

    Please show us how it comes out, looking forward to this.

    Thanks. cubscout
    I checked out their website and I see they do have this type of Super Cub graphic... I'll look closer on a computer later and see if I like it as well as what I've done. There are a few details on mine that I might like better... might check in to having my version made by them. I appreciate the info, and I'll be sure to show what I wind up doing : )

  14. #94

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    I happen to like the paint scheme IMG_0004.jpgIMG_0004.jpg
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  15. #95

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    IMG_0280.jpgEIMG_0280.jpgxample of script used
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  16. #96

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    DANG! That's purty. Looks like I need to try to stretch my fuel range out to Roggen . But what's that funny-lookin thing with the odd windows in the back of the hangar....

    Thanks. cubscout

  17. #97
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    Looks like a pressurized 210?

  18. #98
    AirPigz's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=RoggenPilot;689546]I happen to like the paint scheme

    Wow, thank you for sharing those pix, they are very inspiring. I just got back to finishing the fabric on the elevators at 8:30pm tonight... Those pix will keep me going!

    Martt
    N9460D

  19. #99

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    RagAero in Placerville CA did the rebuild recover paint. I bought it in its current condition. It's now hangared at Boulder Municipal. They use that that thing behind it to go places, the poor joyless souls.
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  20. #100

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    It is a P210, but my other roommate is a Champ.

  21. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by AirPigz View Post
    Ok, so I have it confirmed that the Piper name in that style of script was in use in 1959, so I have taken that as a base and built up 'Super Cub' in that letter style to put on the project airplane. I don't think the airplanes came out of the factory with this specific graphic on the airplane, but that's ok... not looking to be 100% authentic, just authentic to the age.

    I was unable to locate a version of "Super Cub' that was using this exact style. There's one close, but it's clearly not the exact style as the 'Piper', so I made my own last night and this morning.

    This pic shows what I came up with. Still a little rough on the edges, but I'll clean that up and eventually have some vinyl stencils made.

    Logo Super Cub Black and Red.png

    Let me know what ya think...

    Martt
    N9460D
    That is incorrect, that style was used later. I have made up exact copy masks for the Piper script that would be correct for 1959.

  22. #102
    skipster's Avatar
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    1959 Super Cub 95.jpeg This picture shows a brand new 1959 PA18-95 at Lock Haven factory. I have stencil/ mask to duplicate the Piper on the cowling. Click on picture
    Last edited by skipster; 05-29-2017 at 08:30 PM.
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  23. #103

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    Quote Originally Posted by RoggenPilot View Post
    RagAero in Placerville CA did the rebuild recover paint. I bought it in its current condition. It's now hangared at Boulder Municipal. They use that that thing behind it to go places, the poor joyless souls.
    Well heck, I haven't been able to get to the PRB Consular Office to get an Entry Visa to the People's Republic of Boulder. But maybe if you can sneak out some time, like some of fly-ins.... And reliable rumour that there has gotten to be a pretty good cadre of Supercubs just up the road at Longmont, with occasional visitors from Erie and Platte Valley. Except when they fly out to places like La Garita. Or so I've heard

    Paint job like the one just posted of the '59 PA-18A in factory cotton I flew quite a bit in a land far ago and long, long, away. The Piper and heck, even Cessna paint designers in that era had an eye for the paint lines which really complemented the aeroplane's lines. That one would be a LOT of work to lay out, though.

    Thanks. cubscout

  24. #104
    AirPigz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skipster View Post
    1959 Super Cub 95.jpeg This picture shows a brand new 1959 PA18-95 at Lock Haven factory. I have stencil/ mask to duplicate the Piper on the cowling. Click on picture
    I've seen that the script 'Super Cub' wasn't put on the airplanes in 59, but I thought that style was in use with putting 'Piper' on various other of their airplanes. Do you have any definitive info on when that script style was first used? The goal isn't to be accurate to factory paint, just accurate to the time period.

    Thanx.

    Martt
    N9460D

  25. #105

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    I married a genuine PRB woman, so I get conjugal visits. I still maintain a residence in Columbine. Fortunately the bride is a Wyoming ranch girl who grew up in the back of her dads ranch Supercub

    i told the airport manager at BDU that my Cub is an "electric" model, so I can hangar there. And it's got an alternator and a battery
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  26. #106
    skipster's Avatar
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    Looks like 1951 was the first time for using that script, with the horsepower (125) after it. I see "Piper" in that script beginning in 1960

  27. #107
    AirPigz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skipster View Post
    Looks like 1951 was the first time for using that script, with the horsepower (125) after it. I see "Piper" in that script beginning in 1960
    Thanx for the info. That makes it work for me... again, just trying to fit the era in general.

    Martt

  28. #108
    AirPigz's Avatar
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    Here's a long update with a lot of pix.

    I've been working 70 hours a week on the project trying to get done in time to make it to Oshkosh. Might make it, might not. Since starting the first fabric work on May 19th I have the flaps, ailerons, stabs, elevators, rudder and gear legs all covered, stitched, and taped. Also, as of today, I have the first wing covered, stitched, and about half taped, along with the second wing almost finished covered and will be rib stitching on Saturday. If things go as hoped, I'll be ready to start spraying fill on the 24th. I'm using the Stewart System and so far I'm really liking it. Back in the 80's I used the Ceconite process on a set of T-Craft wings, and then in the 90's I did a Citabria in Stits. I'm using Ceconite fabric this time (Stewarts doesn't make fabric) and will be doing color in their EkoPoly.


    Float Fitting Fairing.jpg

    Some of you might remember that my thread here started with questions about float fittings. Here's a pic of the Dakota Cub fittings that I welded on, and specifically the Super Fil that I added on either side of the weld to help smooth out the transition. My desire all along is to have the fitting look more like a part of the airplane under the fabric than they typically look. I think this will help a lot, but won't really know until it's all done.


    Aileron Detail.jpg

    Here's a close up looking down the leading edge tape on one of the ailerons. I find that the unique nature of the EkoBond glue makes it easy getting the tapes on really straight. Some of you might wonder about that pinked edge at the near end of the aileron... I like to finish off the ends with an end cap of fabric that gets cut around the radius and then folded over, but then I cover the fold-over with a tape near the edge so you don't see any fold-overs directly. This also allows me to run that last chord-wise tape in a straight line even if the end rib isn't quite true.


    Rudder Up Close.jpg

    This is a close up of the rudder trailing edge where the fabric overlap glue joint is on the left side. I mixed up some Super Fil and applied a very thin layer with a crisp metal putty knife to help mask that overlap. I don't have a pic handy of the trailing edge tape, but I'm pretty sure once I spray fill on it you won't be able to see that overlap joint thru it.


    Gear Leg Brake Line Exit.jpg

    The gear legs have the 1/2" square tube welded in for the 2,000# gross weight kit (centered on the front and rear tubes) so the inner surface isn't quite as funky shaped as a standard legs. I wanted a clean way for the brake line to exit so I made some aluminum 'washers' with a circle patch over them. Seems to have turned out pretty nice.


    Tape Up Close.jpg

    Here's a close up of a tape going over the stab stitches. I use flat rib lacing cord and the staggerwing knot. My research on the Stewarts process really pointed out that a key to making the finish process come out really nice is making sure that excess EkoBond is removed carefully and quickly from the top and edges of the tape. Of course I won't know until I start spraying, but it looks to me like the edges are really going to look nice. I also go over the pinked edges with an iron at about 250 degrees which really makes them look tidy.


    Paper Towels.jpg

    Folded Paper Towels.jpg

    I've watched the Stewart videos on youtube several times to pick up on the details, but I wasn't keen on using the blue paper shop towels for removing the excess EkoBond... so I thought I'd try the paper towels that we use in our home. They are cheap WalMart towels that are perfed at far less than full size (their term on the package is: 'sized 4 spills') - they sell the same towel full size so you have to look for 'sized 4 spilles'. They seem to be working fantastic. I fold them in half, and then again into quarters. That gives me 8 surfaces I can use to pick up EkoBond with by folding them as I use them. By having the towel nice and flat, the wipe is very smooth (compared to just using a towel in a wad) and I also get great mileage this way. I'm guessing I will wind up using about 6 rolls of these paper towels for the entire covering process... about $11 worth. I also don't have much trash since they are very flat once they've done their job.


    Wings Hanging Uncovered.jpg

    I work alone and often their isn't even anyone around that could help me turn the wings over, so I came up with the idea of hanging them leading edge down for the entire process. I install the fabric, stitch, tape, and will spray fill and color without ever moving the wings. I have 3 different loops in the rope they hang with that allows me to change the height by moving the carabiner. And I can move them to a different height by myself. So far, the middle position is perfect for installing fabric, stitching, and taping. I will likely move them to the highest position when I spray the leading edges. This arrangement also makes good use of the 20' x 25' space that I'm doing all the work in.


    Cutting Fabric.jpg

    I have a blue and a tan tarp on the floor anywhere that the fabric will touch. I installed heavyweight Ceconite 101 on the lower surface, running from the spar on the top of the leading edge and then around the flap and aileron well. Then the the upper surface, which is medium weigh Ceconite 102, is installed from the spar on the bottom of the leading edge (with a 3" glue joint) up an over the top of the wing to the flap and aileron well. This gives a full double layer of fabric on the leading edge, with the under layer being heavyweight. Best of all, no tapes will be in the radius of the leading edge. A 4" tape will cover the 3" glue joint on the bottom of the wing over the spar area.


    Glueing Top On Wing.jpg

    The first wing as I make the 3" overlap seam on the lower surface. The bottom of the wing has the heavyweight fabric lightly shrunk, and the medium weight is hanging down to the floor as I make that glue joint. I then pull it up and spring clamp in a few places as I get it in position and glued at the trailing edge and tip.


    3 Inch Seam At Spar.jpg

    Here are both layers installed on the first wing, with the 3" glue joint near the spar. The leading edges look fantastic with that double layer. I also made new skins anywhere there were dents (5 new sections total) so it looks like these leading edges are gonna look awesome.


    Rib Stitching.jpg

    It took me 12 hours of labor to stitch the first wing. Flat cord slows the process down a bit but I think it's totally worth it. I don't like having chalk line dust on the wing so I lay out the stitch locations with a 6 foot steel rule. I made a needle out of 3/32" welding rod with the slightly bent tip. Works great. I lay on the floor to run the needle from the top to the bottom side and then back to the front for the first 5 stitches, then I stand on a step ladder and reach over the trailing edge for the rest of the stitches. I think this is much nice than bending over for every stitch... especially now that I'm 56 years old!


    Both Wings Low Light.jpg

    Both wings last night just before giving up for the night. The near wing only has the bottom fabric glued, not yet shrunk.



    Both Wings.jpg

    Here's the second wing today with its lower fabric lightly shrunk and the upper fabric pulled up and over as I get ready to trim and glue it in place. The 3" overlap seem can be seen near the floor.



    I've made a lot of progress in the last 4 weeks, and I have the fatigue to prove it! However, I'm feeling really good about the work and I'm hopeful I can keep the pace up and have the airplane in the air before long. I welcome comments but I will say that my priority is working on the airplane, so I might not be able to respond for a while.

    Martt
    1959 PA-18A
    N9460D
    Last edited by AirPigz; 06-16-2017 at 02:28 AM.
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  29. #109
    Bearhawk Builder's Avatar
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    Nicely done! As long as you wipe all the glue off or through the fabric your pinks will look great. The Ekofill is somewhat thinner than some other mid coats so it's harder to 'bury' the tapes but I find you can lightly hit the pinks with the iron after the Ekofill is sprayed if needed and then carefully sand the edges. Do this between coats and the edges look really good.
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  30. #110
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    The plan early on in the project was to cover the slightly beat up red painted interior panels with a red leather as a way of hiding imperfections and adding a great look and smell. I found a source for really nice leather at a great price and ordered a couple color samples. Both were close but one was a bit thinner with a little less texture, so I choose it.

    20170621_113044.jpg

    20170620_211356.jpg

    20170621_112953.jpg

    20170621_113115.jpg

    I got started covering and installing the panels a couple days ago (while moving various parts of the project forward at once) and the results so far have been awesome. I'm using 3M Yellow Super Trim Adhesive and I'm confident it's gonna do very well. It's $26 for a 19oz can, so it's not a cheap way to go, but cheap adhesive is rarely ever a good choice. I think the most important step is using a roller that you can really lean into to help the adhesive that you apply to both parts make really good contact. This thin leather used with this adhesive looks really nice going around the outside corners... nice tight radius.

    I hammered out the bigger dents, did some straightening, and used some professional bondo designed for really small imperfections to smooth out the tiny dings. Now that some of the the panels are covered, they are almost perfectly smooth... really couldn't be any happier with the results. Once the seats are in, which will be a combo of the same red leather and a cream leather, I think it's gonna all look amazing.

    And yes, I left the hopper mounting stub on both sides of the fuselage and you can see the left one pushing against the leather. I've got my reasons for leaving them, and so far I'm thinking the leather tent over them is the least noticeable solution to covering them up.

    Martt
    Warsaw, Indiana
    N9460D
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  31. #111
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    Nice work. I know you wrote about taking this ship to Oshkosh. That would be nice but the Piper nuts would really like to see this bird at Sentimental Journey next year in my opinion.
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  32. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cub junkie View Post
    Nice work. I know you wrote about taking this ship to Oshkosh. That would be nice but the Piper nuts would really like to see this bird at Sentimental Journey next year in my opinion.
    Thank you. The airplane will be living in California (belongs to a brother I have out there) but I might be able talk him into letting me fly it across the country to Sentimental next year. That would sure be an awesome adventure. I went to one of Clyde Smith's workshops last November and now I have Lock Haven desires : )

    Martt
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  33. #113
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    I've been working 7 days a week (70+ hours a week) for the last 6 weeks... fabric work is basically done and on to some of the paint finishing now. I got the left wing sprayed a few days back and it turned looking really nice. I've now experienced the full Stewart Systems process and I really like it.


    Left Wing Painted 2.jpg


    Left Wing Painted 1.jpg


    Left Wing Painted 3.jpg


    Left Wing Painted 4.jpg

    I have little experience painting large objects, and also haven't used a real spray gun much, tho I did cover and paint a Citabria in the 90's, so I've been careful to try to research how to do things and have paid close attention to the specified Stewart's procedures. I'm using a DiVilbiss Finishline 4 waterborne gun, and a large compressor able to supply the minimum 23psi at 13cfm. I've used the updated Stewart's procedure of brushed, thinned ekobond to fill the fabric weave instead of the previous procedure of using brushed ekofill. After 3 crosscoats of gray ekofill with some sanding I'm doing 2 crosscoats of white ekoprime and a lot of detailed sanding. The ekoprime is really great to sand and it doesn't have the somewhat clammy feel that ekofill does. Plus, the white color makes it really easy to see minor imperfections.

    On the left wing I sprayed the Daytona White ekopoly base color with 6 crosscoats on the top and 4 on the bottom. This paint is applied in thin 'fog' coats to build up the color saturation, then finished with a final 'wet' coat. This procedure of really thin coats is new to me so I was a little uncertain applying it. I'm also putting in the full amount of 'flattener' in the paint (2 parts paint, 1 part flattener) and I didn't know how that would affect the look of the 'wet' coat as it was sprayed. As a result, I didn't have the wet coat as wet as it really should have been. I had full color saturation, but I did not have an even and correct sheen between the bays. It was only noticeable when the light was in the right spot, but I confirmed the problem by moving the wing outside into the sun the day after painting. So, I decided I would scuff sand the entire wing (these paints must be scuffed for adhesion) and recoat. I added 3 more crosscoats (EDIT: I had said 4 crosscoats originally but it was 3) to both the top and bottom, and made sure that the wet pass truly went on with a wet look. This recoat was done 26 hours after I had sprayed the first coats. I was pleased to see that not only did I get the even sheen I needed, but the flattener did indeed soften the gloss quite a bit from the way it looked when it was truly wet on the wing.

    I learned a lot in that relatively short period of time, and fortunately, my missteps were easy to fix. 24 hours after spraying the recoat of Daytona White. I started masking for the Santa Fe Red leading edge. Since I work alone and wouldn't have quick access to a helper to turn a wing over, I have done all of the wing fabric work with the wing hanging leading-edge-down. This has worked surprising well from fabric install, rib stitching, tape application, fill and sand, and color coat. I wasn't sure what to expect trying to mask a spanwise line tho hanging this way. Turned out to be a bit of a challenge but no problem at all. I first ran a line of making tape about 1/8" from the desired line, then I put a 1/4" 3M fineline #218 tape on top of the masking tape and right on the desired line. then I masked off the entire wing with thin plastic sheet and more masking tape. The curve around the tip was all eyeballed (around midnight actually) and ultimately turned out to be easier than I expected, but still a lot of work. I also had the wing hanging in the highest of the 3 positions I had in my hanging ropes, which put the leading edge high enough that I could lay under and spray the nose.

    I didn't get spraying until after 1am, and by then the temperature had dropped and the humidity was rising. By the time I had the first fog coat on the humidity was 76% and rising. 75% is the stated max for spraying, so I was heading into a problem. I decided to heat the space to see if that would help, and it did. I ran the heat up to 85 degrees and got the humidity down to 70%. The ekopoly needs to tack up between fog coats, and the high humidity was really slowing that down. Once I got it back down, the tack time reduced significantly and I could get back to applying more coats relatively quickly. I'm guessing I applied around 10 fog coats of the red on the leading edge. At about 3:15am I sprayed the final wet coat and immediately pulled the fineline tape off. The edges looked fantastic, which was a huge relief.

    I came back about 10am and removed the plastic sheet and masking tape and was really pleased to see how smooth the transition line was between the two colors. You can just barely feel it. Really glad I chose to pull the fineline tape right away, otherwise there would be a noticeable edge at the color change. All the masking worked out great, but I did have a few spots where the red bled under the tape when it went over a pinked tape edge. At about 2pm I used a pair of precision tweezers and a 4x magnifying glass to gently scrape the bleed under off before the paint before fully cured. The spots were small, you wouldn't have even noticed them from 10 feet away, but nice to have the line look pretty much perfect even up close.

    I'm hoping to spray the base color on the fuselage today, and with what I've learned so far, I'm confident I can do a good job the first time around.

    I'm very happy with the Stewart System. These colors look just right for a vintage style Super Cub, and the satin luster with the flattener added just looks fantastic.

    Martt Clupper
    Warsaw, Indiana
    N9460D
    Last edited by AirPigz; 07-15-2017 at 12:19 PM.

  34. #114
    cubpilot2's Avatar
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    The wings look great!

    What was your reason for using heavy wt. fabric on the lower side and medium wt. on top? Was it to reduce the "scalloping"?

    I have not seen a wing covered with the fuel tank installed before. How did that work out for your stitching with the padding on the ribs?

    Thanks for the detail of your experience with the Stewarts. I've been thinking of using it on my next project.
    Ed
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  35. #115
    AirPigz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cubpilot2 View Post
    The wings look great!

    What was your reason for using heavy wt. fabric on the lower side and medium wt. on top? Was it to reduce the "scalloping"?

    I have not seen a wing covered with the fuel tank installed before. How did that work out for your stitching with the padding on the ribs?

    Thanks for the detail of your experience with the Stewarts. I've been thinking of using it on my next project.

    I figured the tighter weave of medium weight would make the top look a little nicer, and the extra strength of heavyweight on the bottom would help keep the fabric from vibrating as much in the prop blast, would make it a little less likely to be damaged if something is thrown up at the wing by a tire, and, it also worked out nice in that I installed the fabric such that I have a full double layer of fabric covering the leading edge, and that first layer is the heavyweight fabric. I get the protection over the screws and edges with the heavyweight fabric, along with a general smooth look, but the tighter weave of medium is what you see on the outside of the leading edge. The glue joint for the two is back at the spar on the lower side, covered by a 4" tape that is centered over the spar. So, there are no tapes on the leading edge until that one over the spar on the bottom, and I have a full double layer of fabric. I wont know for certain how well that works/looks until I have the wings on the fuselage, but looking at the red leading edge as it is, no tapes there sure looks nice.

    On the fuel tank: I made a special hook/needle tool to be able to stitch the tank ribs with the tank in place. The hook tool allowed me to get just over the rib (going in the hole in one side and out the hole on the other side) then I would feed the cord into the small drilled hole in the end of the hook and pull the hook back out, effectively pulling the cord over the rib. From there I'd tie the knot, then switch to the regular needle to get to the next stitch location, then use the hook tool again.

    Stewarts Systems updated their installation manual in February. The revision #3 (2/01/2017) manual can be downloaded on the support page at http://www.stewartsystems.aero/support.aspx and it includes the info on using thinned ekobond to seal the weave instead of the previous method of using ekofill. The previous method required wetting the fabric to help with penetration into the weave. The current method requires that the fabric be cleaned with ekoclean, then rinsed and dried, but you don't wet the fabric before applying the thinned ekobond.

    The older videos on youtube from Stewart's are very helpful in understanding the way things work with the system (I watched some of them several times) tho it's most important to read, understand, and follow the directions laid out in the revised installation manual, especially since that's where you'll find the update on sealing the weave.

    Martt
    N9460D
    Thanks cubpilot2, Bearhawk Builder, Jim Hann thanked for this post
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  36. #116
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    Nice write up on the Stewart's paint process. Your results appear to be very nice. Interesting on the ekobond as a filler, I'll have to look that up. What do think the advantage is? Sound like you did everything right, watching humidity, heating when needed etc. The fog coat/wet coat process is actually an easy spray process right? Almost eliminates the risk of runs. If when you pull your tapes you have some bleed under a cloth dampened with denatured alcohol will clean it off before its cured. Just a heads up, covering fresh paint with plastic sheeting as a masking for a contrasting color can cause blushing spots. Ask how I know.

  37. #117
    AirPigz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bearhawk Builder View Post
    Nice write up on the Stewart's paint process. Your results appear to be very nice. Interesting on the ekobond as a filler, I'll have to look that up. What do think the advantage is? Sound like you did everything right, watching humidity, heating when needed etc. The fog coat/wet coat process is actually an easy spray process right? Almost eliminates the risk of runs. If when you pull your tapes you have some bleed under a cloth dampened with denatured alcohol will clean it off before its cured. Just a heads up, covering fresh paint with plastic sheeting as a masking for a contrasting color can cause blushing spots. Ask how I know.
    My guess on the ekobond as a weave sealer, which I've heard is how the process was instructed at some point in the past (before the change to using a brushed coat of ekofill), is that the thinned ekobond really easily permeates and encapsulates the fabric, and the ekofill appears to have needed the fabric to be wetted to get good penetration. If the fabric wasn't wetted sufficiently, I'm guessing the bond wasn't as good as it should have been. The switch back to using ekobond makes this critical step easier to get right.

    I suppose the fog coat/wet coat process is pretty easy, but it's not what most of us are used to. So it becomes a bit more of a challenge when first using it. Plus, the paint goes on very thin this way which means you have to watch closely to be sure you have full color saturation everywhere.

    I'll try some alcohol on the next stripes for removing any bleed under. I didn't look at all of the line details when I pulled the tapes before since it was already 3:30am and I need to be done! It was 7 hours later before I realized there were a few little bleed under spots. Don't know if the alcohol would have worked them.

    Thanx for the info on the plastic making sheet.

    Martt
    N9460D
    Thanks Jim Hann thanked for this post

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