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Thread: Building a Javron Cub

  1. #2121
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    flylowslow - no, headliner is not removable., but has worked great so far. Not a lot of changes planned for the new build, except will add autopilot. And avionics will be whatever is available at that time. Boy, they are changing fast, and all for the better. If you are driving to Jays, you drive right by Poplar Grove (near Rockford IL), feel free to stop and visit, if I'm there and not in Spokane.

    Denny - Yes, if necessary I can run ROP and it does lower the temps a little. Throttling back has the greatest affect. I had to do that last year coming back from AK. The midwest was in a heat wave with temps over 100 all across from MT to Illinois. Made it back OK but that is what is driving me to see if I can improve on things. I want to be able to fly in the heat of the summer and not worry about my CHT's.

    Thanks for all the inputs gents. It will be a couple of weeks until I can tackle this but, as always, I'll keep you posted.

    Bill
    Very Blessed.
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    I put Aluminized tape over the cowl door hinge to help close up cowl, lots of daylight showing through that hinge.
    DENNY

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    Some say that Pmag's timing curve contribute to high CHT's
    Post #13 is pretty good in this thread.
    http://www.vansairforce.com/communit...=107804&page=2
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  4. #2124
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bcone1381 View Post
    Some say that Pmag's timing curve contribute to high CHT's
    Post #13 is pretty good in this thread.
    http://www.vansairforce.com/communit...=107804&page=2
    My post on the same subject

    http://www.supercub.org/forum/showth...l=1#post632017

    Bill
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  5. #2125

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    Here's what my Superior Air Parts manual recommends for CHTs. CHT redline is 500*, just like Lycoming.

    For maximum service life, cylinder head temperatures should be maintained below 430ºF (221ºC) during high performance cruise operation and below 400ºF (204ºC) for economy cruise operation, with 300-400ºF (149-204ºC) optimal.
    I can't recall flying an airplane in "economy cruise" mode. Especially a Cub with a fixed pitch. elpcub posted elsewhere that his Titan engine normal temps go to 450*. It appears the manufacturers are acknowledging that these juiced-up engines run warm. I target 400* as my comfort zone limit but according to the manufacturer I shouldn't worry about 425.

  6. #2126

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    20180201_163631.jpgBill, got jays boot cowl jigged up, but now the choice of engine and exhaust, defintlty thrustline, but wanted to stay with 160hp. will stay with your idea on headliner. I liked your wing-wag taxi lights, have to look into that. Any body have an old tailwheel to let go of?
    If you get lost while flying, don't try hail a cop. Pick up the first railroad you find and hug it until you get somewhere.

  7. #2127

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    Flylowslow. Still need an old tailwheel? Had an old Scott laying around.

  8. #2128
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Folks

    Some random thoughts as I do the annual condition inspection.


    If you operate on floats, I strongly encourage you to take the tail off every year and clean and grease the through tubes that hold the horizontal stabs on. This area is pretty much under water on every takeoff and landing and it gets a lot of abuse. It does not take that long to do.



    This will be hard to visualize and understand, but for those building a Javron Cub hang with me for a bit. The rear panel for the extended, lower baggage compartment has a slope and attaches at the top crossbar via a couple of tabs, and then 2 more tabs at the bottom. Because of the angle and location of these attach tabs you can't get a screwdriver in there unless you have no upper baggage floor. I had to drill a couple of holes (one through my ELT mount, shown here) to get a screw driver in there. It is not a bad design just a point to consider for future maintenance. If I had to do it over I would use those top two tabs to attach a "U" shaped clip onto so that that back panel slides up into those clips, then has a couple of screws at the bottom to secure it in place. Thus instead of 4 screws holding that panel in, it would have two (slip into) slots at the top and two screws at the bottom.


    This is a real pain. When on floats you will track a lot of sand, gravel, crud, mud, etc into the cockpit. It gets under and in everything. Removing the rear floorboards is a BIG job and involves taking all the flight controls out and apart. The seat base has to come out, seatbelt, brakes, torque tube, flap handle, etc etc. Rudder pedals with those stupid saddles and springs have to come out. Then it all has to go back together, with no binding. It introduces a lot of places for you to screw up and forget a cotter pin, nut etc. These are critical parts to the safety of flight. Next time I will do a metal belly pan in the cockpit area.


    So.......folks often ask what would you do different next time.....

    Metal belly to the rear gear fitting.
    Larger access panels. If you use the standard Cub fabric reinforcements it will lead you into small access openings. Don't be afraid to make the opening larger and make your own reinforcements. Especially helpful in the tail access area.
    Make the front seat base attach tabs about 1/2" taller so you don't have to fight the floorboard to get the attach bolts in and out
    Reinforce the area where the window latch attaches to the bottom of the wing. This is in the prop blast area and it gets worked a lot.
    Back cargo panel attach system as mentioned above
    Increase the size of the flap access opening in the wing. Don't use the std reinforcement, use the full width of the bay between the ribs.
    Paint the V brace flat black before you cover. Use a good epoxy paint so it will not wear off. You will have your hands up there a lot.
    Float fitting tabs in front of the cabane V as mentioned in my float mount section of this thread.
    If you use electric trim, mount the limit switches on the fuselage not the yoke. It works fine as I did it but that would be better.

    Just some random thoughts that might help someone.

    Hope this helps

    Bill
    Very Blessed.
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  9. #2129
    Farmboy's Avatar
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    Building a Javron Cub

    If you’ve forgotten to paint the V brace flat black as Bill mentioned and you find the reflection in the windshield a nuisance along with hand wear.... True “Gaffers” tape comes in flat black non-reflective, and one strip will roll onto each tube perfectly to eliminate the nuisance.

    IMG_0238.JPG


    Sent from my iPhone using SuperCub.Org

  10. #2130
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Rusk View Post

    This will be hard to visualize and understand, but for those building a Javron Cub hang with me for a bit. The rear panel for the extended, lower baggage compartment has a slope and attaches at the top crossbar via a couple of tabs, and then 2 more tabs at the bottom. Because of the angle and location of these attach tabs you can't get a screwdriver in there unless you have no upper baggage floor. I had to drill a couple of holes (one through my ELT mount, shown here) to get a screw driver in there. It is not a bad design just a point to consider for future maintenance. If I had to do it over I would use those top two tabs to attach a "U" shaped clip onto so that that back panel slides up into those clips, then has a couple of screws at the bottom to secure it in place. Thus instead of 4 screws holding that panel in, it would have two (slip into) slots at the top and two screws at the bottom.
    These work great. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0062FSAVI...&pd_rd_w=YfV8J
    Steve Pierce

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  11. #2131
    mvivion's Avatar
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    Bill,

    Good thoughts all. The first SC I flew a lot was on floats most of the year, and in salt water a lot. It had a metal belly, which was, as you noted, nice for cleaning the “basement”. Getting all those pencils observers dropped, etc. What would be REALLY nice though would be a carbon fiber belly panel instead.

    That Cub worked in Kodiak from 1969 (year it was born) till 1984, when it was recovered (original cover was cotton), never hangared, and I’m pretty sure the tail feathers never came off. After it was stripped, the frame and tail was clean as can be. The rebuilder wouldn’t believe me that it had been in salt for years.

    i do think taking the tail apart every once in a while is a good idea. And, if you haven’t already, remove all the float parts, clean, lube and re assemble before the plane goes back on floats.

    MTV
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  12. #2132
    skywagon8a's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvivion View Post
    The rebuilder wouldn’t believe me that it had been in salt for years.
    It depends on where the salt water is located. Alaska salt water is far less corrosive and active than Key West Florida.
    N1PA

  13. #2133
    mvivion's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skywagon8a View Post
    It depends on where the salt water is located. Alaska salt water is far less corrosive and active than Key West Florida.
    Yes, temperatures make a big difference. That said, that cub was eventually replaced by a “brand S” and they had to replace the tail feathers after two seasons.

    MTV

  14. #2134
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvivion View Post
    Bill,

    Good thoughts all. The first SC I flew a lot was on floats most of the year, and in salt water a lot. It had a metal belly, which was, as you noted, nice for cleaning the “basement”. Getting all those pencils observers dropped, etc. What would be REALLY nice though would be a carbon fiber belly panel instead.

    That Cub worked in Kodiak from 1969 (year it was born) till 1984, when it was recovered (original cover was cotton), never hangared, and I’m pretty sure the tail feathers never came off. After it was stripped, the frame and tail was clean as can be. The rebuilder wouldn’t believe me that it had been in salt for years.

    i do think taking the tail apart every once in a while is a good idea. And, if you haven’t already, remove all the float parts, clean, lube and re assemble before the plane goes back on floats.

    MTV
    Was it built as a sea plane by Piper? Those airplanes along with the last Lockhaven Super Cubs had the aluminized finish sprayed on them and are really good and not having rust.
    Steve Pierce

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  15. #2135

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Rusk View Post
    Folks

    Some random thoughts as I do the annual condition inspection.


    If you operate on floats, I strongly encourage you to take the tail off every year and clean and grease the through tubes that hold the horizontal stabs on. This area is pretty much under water on every takeoff and landing and it gets a lot of abuse. It does not take that long to do.



    This will be hard to visualize and understand, but for those building a Javron Cub hang with me for a bit. The rear panel for the extended, lower baggage compartment has a slope and attaches at the top crossbar via a couple of tabs, and then 2 more tabs at the bottom. Because of the angle and location of these attach tabs you can't get a screwdriver in there unless you have no upper baggage floor. I had to drill a couple of holes (one through my ELT mount, shown here) to get a screw driver in there. It is not a bad design just a point to consider for future maintenance. If I had to do it over I would use those top two tabs to attach a "U" shaped clip onto so that that back panel slides up into those clips, then has a couple of screws at the bottom to secure it in place. Thus instead of 4 screws holding that panel in, it would have two (slip into) slots at the top and two screws at the bottom.

    Bill,

    After you get it cleaned up, and going back together get a roll of insulation/foam tape at a metal building supply and stick it in front of the floor board openings plus all the way across just in front of your front seat posts and across the back. It makes a great crud dam and you just vacuum it out ocassionally.

    Kirby
    Remember, These are the Good old Days!
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  16. #2136
    pittsdriver's Avatar
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    I put a metal belly on the last Cub I built. From now on I'll talk the customer into it.
    Vans RV7 finished 2008
    Backcountry Super Cub finished 2011
    A&P Aircraft rebuilding, Building assistance
    1956 Supercub complete rebuild
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  17. #2137
    mvivion's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Pierce View Post
    Was it built as a sea plane by Piper? Those airplanes along with the last Lockhaven Super Cubs had the aluminized finish sprayed on them and are really good and not having rust.
    Nope, it wasn’t an “S”. The frame was thoroughly covered with zinc chromate, and tubes treated. I don’t think that aluminized treatment started till much later in production.....like late 70s?

    When they pulled the cotton off, that frame looked nearly new.....I wasn’t the only one amazed. As far as I know that plane was never hosed down after being in salt water. I always tried to land in fresh water and splash around some before going home, but never hosed down.

    MTV

  18. #2138
    mvivion's Avatar
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    Another thing that helps keep crud out of belly: Install an aluminum angle at aft end of floor, to create a dam of sorts to prevent “stuff” from sliding off the aft end of floor and falling into belly. Easy, light, and keeps a bunch of junk out of the belly.

    MTV
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  19. #2139
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvivion View Post
    Nope, it wasn’t an “S”. The frame was thoroughly covered with zinc chromate, and tubes treated. I don’t think that aluminized treatment started till much later in production.....like late 70s?

    When they pulled the cotton off, that frame looked nearly new.....I wasn’t the only one amazed. As far as I know that plane was never hosed down after being in salt water. I always tried to land in fresh water and splash around some before going home, but never hosed down.

    MTV
    I worked on a Clipper from 1949 that had it.
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers

  20. #2140
    mvivion's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Pierce View Post
    I worked on a Clipper from 1949 that had it.
    Interesting. Of the ~ 25 or so Super Cubs I’ve flown, I’ve only seen one with the aluminized frame, a late 70s airplane, and that one was a disaster.....lots of corrosion under the coating. I’ve never flown a Cub with the “official” S designation.

  21. #2141

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    Remove the small aft metal clean out. Place a hose through one of the stick openings in the floor. Turn water on. I'd like to fo the same under my Cessna floor. 40 years worth of hydraulic fluid and sand need to be melted out with a good supply of hot water.
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  22. #2142
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    I bought an -18/150 in 1981 ( it was a 1960) that had the original cover on it, and it had the aluminized tubing in it.

  23. #2143
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    This '52 A model I'm building has the aluminized frame. That along with some brown gooey oil all over the lower tubes and tail area kept the frame real clean.

  24. #2144
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Oversized Elevators

    At times I have felt like I was not able to drive my wing to its full AOA potential. Also I felt like I was running out of elevator in the flare. So I decided to try a new set of larger elevators. I'm sure many of you will know what I am referring to, but for others, it is possible to get (in the experimental world) a set of elevators that are about 15% larger than stock. They have essentially the same shape, but the trailing edge is extended to give more surface area.
    Prior to putting the new elevators on I flew the Cub too try to get a baseline set of data points so I could make a more scientific evaluation of the performance gains, if any, rather than just "feelings", and to hopefully create a experiment with some validity.
    The only variable changed was the elevators. The aircraft was refueled after the first flight to try to keep the GW the same. All Stalls, and slow flight was done at 3K MSL, in the same direction (to mitigate wind affects), etc. The landings were done at the same runway. The temp did go up as the day progressed so the actual DA changed a little as well. The increased density altitude would show a higher stall speed based on TAS but since I used "indicated" speed for my measurements DA has no significant affect. All events were done three times to get an average number and to increase reliability. Accuracy was based strictly on my instruments. I did not outfit my cub with additional measuring equipment.



    I covered the larger elevator in the back with a sheet to give contrast. White on white was hard to see.



    It is about 3" larger for most of the trailing edge



    They don't nest very well so this is an approximation.

    Stock Left Elevator = 91.02oz
    Stock Right Elevator = 90.0oz
    Oversize Left Elevator = 99.96oz
    Oversize Right Elevator = 100.26oz
    Total weight gain 19.2oz

    The test was done with my cub in the following configuration......

    Stock cub, square wing, VG's, fuel Pod, 180hp, 3" ext gear, 31" Bushwheels, Cato 84/43, CC gap seals,

    Aircraft Gross weight during test 1450. GC @ 76.8 (CG based on prop face datum, range 70.5 to 79 ((subtract 60 for wing LE datum)) The aircraft was trimmed for 60 mph, and the trim was not changed throughout the test in order to reduce the variables.

    The
    baseline flight was done with the following ATIS....Winds 200/3, 9C, and 2995 on the altimeter
    The new elevator test was done with this ATIS............winds 250/7, 19C, and 2984 on the altimeter

    Baseline Flight Test
    No Flaps, Power Off, stall at 45mph indicated, 14 degrees pitch
    No flaps, 1500 RPM, stall at 41
    mph indicated, 18 degrees pitch
    Full flaps, power off, stall at 39
    mph indicated, 18 degrees pitch
    Full flap, 1500 RPM, stall at 36
    mph indicated, 21 degrees pitch

    Slow flight can be maintained at 38
    mph indicated with full flaps 1600 (approx) RPM and will break at about 22 degrees pitch

    4 sets (of three) landings were done. Final flown at 50 mph indicated, 1200 RPM, and 350 sink rate to the flare, with two notches of flaps (three notches available)
    1) Idle RPM in the flare - TD at 39 mph, could not get the tail down before the mains. Definitely feel like running out of elevator
    2) 1200 RPM in the flare - TD at 39mph, resulted in a 3 point at best
    3) 1400 RPM in the flare - TD at 39mph, resulted in tail first.... barely
    4) Full flap, 40MPH on final, Behind the power curve, 1500 plus RPM on final and in the flare gave a clear tail first landing, TD at 36mph

    Oversize Elevator Flight Test

    No flap, power off, stall at 43mph indicated, 16 to 17 degrees pitch
    No flap, 1500 RPM, stall at 40mph indicated, 20 degrees pitch
    Full flap, power off, stall at 39mph indicated, 21 degrees pitch
    Full Flap, 1500 RPM, stall at 35mph indicated, 24 degrees pitch

    Slow flight with full flaps could be maintained at about 36 mph indicated and close to 24 degrees pitch but took 1800rpm plus (way deep behind the power curve)

    Same landing criteria as the baseline test

    1) Idle RPM in the flare, TD at 37mph, three point (tail first on one of the three)
    2) 1200 RPM in the flare, TD at 37mph, tail first
    3) 1400 RPM in the flare, TD 37mph, easy tail first
    4)
    Full flap, 40MPH on final, Behind the power curve, 1500 plus RPM on final and in the flare gave a VERY clear tail first landing, TD below 35mph


    Summary


    ​The oversize elevators add about 1pd 3oz to your weight but they do improve elevator authority a noticeable amount. I could not detect a increase in stick force required, the elevators felt the same but they do allow you to drive the wing to a higher AOA. This is very noticeable in the stall. With the stock elevators the stall was mostly a mush and it felt like the tail was stalled not the wing. With the oversize elevators you can clearly drive the wing to a higher AOA and the wing now stalls and gives a clear break. No more mushing stalls. The elevators drop the stall speed approximately 2 mph indicated in all flap configurations, and allow more elevator in the flare. It is not huge but it is noticeable and significant.


    Hope this helps

    Bill
    Last edited by Bill Rusk; 04-27-2018 at 05:43 AM.
    Very Blessed.

  25. #2145
    Lowrider
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    Bill as always...fine job and very informative! Makes me feel better knowing it help since I did a 3" stretch on my elevators too.
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

    There are no new ways to crash an airplane no matter how hard you may try!

  26. #2146
    skywagon8a's Avatar
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    Bill,
    How much did the additional 1 lb 3.2 oz move the CG aft? Did you consider that the CG shift could have been the reason for the reduced stall speed? Try placing some temporary ballast in the engine compartment in order to repeat the test at exactly the same CG.

    The larger elevator should help when you are on the nose heavy amphibs.
    N1PA
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  27. #2147

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    Bill are you using gap seals?
    Remember, These are the Good old Days!

  28. #2148
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Kirby - Yes. I have Cub Crafters gap seals, and they were used on both tests. My above post has been changed to reflect that. Thank you

    Pete - Your point is taken ( and I know you understand the critical nature of CG on flight performance ) so let me reply to help others. As tested for the Baseline the CG was at 76.78. The new elevators would make the CG 76.92. Given a range of 70.5 - 79, moving it .14 inches would be pretty hard to account for. In order to get the test CG at 76.78 I was running 30 pounds of lead in the tail. Without the lead my CG would have been 73.48. It takes 10 pounds of lead in the tail to move the CG 1 inch. It takes a couple of inches of movement to really "feel" the difference. But there is a significantly different feel from 73 inches to 76 inches in how the airplane feels and performs. It flies much better at the aft CG range, as just about all aircraft do. However; that said, there is a sweet spot for each aircraft and it may not be the aft limit. On my aircraft, beyond 77 inches the controls feel a little too light for my preference, and I do not like the spin characteristics. The advantage of the lead is it can be , and is, removed for camping trips which allows me to load a significant amount of gear in the plane without exceeding the aft CG limit. Perhaps someday I will get the Cub back to New Holstein and give everyone two rides. Both forward CG then aft CG. Then, like you Pete, others might see, feel, and understand the difference.

    Hope this helps

    Bill
    Very Blessed.

  29. #2149
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    Great info Bill, as always. Much appreciate your efforts!
    Joe


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    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Good info Bill. I have a friend who just pulled the trigger on a Javron Cub and had lots of questions on all the options and this was one of them.
    Steve Pierce

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  31. #2151
    www.SkupTech.com mike mcs repair's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Rusk View Post
    . I'm sure many of you will know what I am referring to, but for others, it is possible to get (in the experimental world) a set of elevators that are about 15% larger than stock. They have essentially the same shape, but the trailing edge is extended to give more surface area.
    Bill

    STC'd by Atlee available too...

    http://www.fadodge.com/new-stc-overs...rs-and-rudder/

    http://www.fadodge.com/oversize-elevators/

  32. #2152
    Dave Calkins's Avatar
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    Many have noted the increased authority of the oversized elevators over the years. One sourdough I recovered for wouldnt let me buy mew stock ones to replace his oversize elevs, had me do repairs instead.

    Interesting......Steve Kracke at Atlees told me the 2.5" extended were the largest they could go before flutter showed in testing!!! ...2.5" is big enuff for me!!

    Bill, where is the datum for your w&b calcs? would be nice to relate this to a Piper Cub
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  33. #2153
    skywagon8a's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Calkins View Post
    Interesting......Steve Kracke at Atlees told me the 2.5" extended were the largest they could go before flutter showed in testing!!! ...2.5" is big enuff for me!!
    With this in mind it would be appropriate to add a little bit of lead ballast in the forward corner of the balance horn of the elevator. Enough for a small amount of over balance.
    N1PA
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  34. #2154
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Dave - I use the prop face as the datum. It makes it a little easier as there are no negative values. Since it is pretty much a stock Cub you can use the moment arms right off the TCDS. I added a few new moments for extended baggage, tail ballast, etc. by leveling the fuselage, and using a plumb to markings on the floor. It was also good to double check the TCDS numbers, which were surprisingly accurate (or at least matched mine).


    Prop Face - 0
    Oil sump - 24
    Firewall - 35
    Inst panel - 51
    Wing LE - 60
    Gear axle - 62
    Front Seat - 71
    Fuel - 84
    Fuel Pod Fuel - 90
    Rear Seat - 97
    Fwd wall lower baggage - 105.5
    Middle lower baggage - 136
    Aft wall lower baggage - 166
    Fwd wall upper baggage - 136.25
    Middle of upper baggage - 162.25
    Aft wall upper baggage - 189.25
    Tail ballast - 233.6
    Tail Post - 249
    Tailwheel axle - 263.6

    Hope this helps

    Bill
    Last edited by Bill Rusk; 04-28-2018 at 07:32 AM.
    Very Blessed.

  35. #2155
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    So I have a question, at what flight regime do you need the bigger tail on a wheeled Super Cub? I normally wheel land and don't generally come in behind the power curve in my Super Cub. Where do you find the bigger tail feathers the most useful?
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers

  36. #2156
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Steve

    Point well taken. On floats and when doing wheel landings you probably won't see a real need for the extra authority. I do use three point landings in some circumstances, and at times the back side of the power curve, and in that regime the extra tail authority is helpful.

    Bill
    Very Blessed.
    Likes Hardtailjohn liked this post

  37. #2157
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    Ok, that makes sense. When helping a friend order his Javron kit he asked me about the larger tail feathers and I told him the only reason I could see for them would be if you were installing slats or slots. I realize everybody has different missions for their airplanes and was curious where these bigger surfaces might come into play.
    Steve Pierce

    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.
    Will Rogers

  38. #2158
    skywagon8a's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Pierce View Post
    So I have a question, at what flight regime do you need the bigger tail on a wheeled Super Cub? I normally wheel land and don't generally come in behind the power curve in my Super Cub. Where do you find the bigger tail feathers the most useful?
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Rusk View Post
    Steve

    Point well taken. On floats and when doing wheel landings you probably won't see a real need for the extra authority. I do use three point landings in some circumstances, and at times the back side of the power curve, and in that regime the extra tail authority is helpful.

    Bill
    Bill, Do you not trim out the elevator forces when on approach with your electric trim?
    N1PA

  39. #2159
    Bill Rusk's Avatar
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    Pete - yes I do. But for the test I left the trim in the same place throughout just to make sure there was one less variable.

    Airplane is back on floats. I will post more about the annual to hopefully help others

    Bill
    Very Blessed.

  40. #2160
    DJ's Avatar
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    What trim position did you use? Full nose up or more mid range?

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using SuperCub.Org mobile app
    The heavens declare the glory of God; the skies proclaim the work of His hands. Psalms 19:1

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