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Thread: Good book for those who have time to read

  1. #1
    Clay Hammond's Avatar
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    Good book for those who have time to read

    "I've flown Travelairs for thousands of hours without using any parachutes. You can't use a parachute in them anyway because the cargo is loaded to the roof and you can't get out. But why get out? If you can't fly the biggest piece back, then ride it down. Fly what you have left to the ground and land the damn thing. Even in the trees, land it and walk away....."
    ---Mountain pilot Bob Johnson

    Great quote out of a great book, Fly The Biggest Piece Back, by Steve Smith. About Bob Johnson and Johnson Flying Service of Missoula, Montana in the early days. What eventually became Evergreen Airlines. Great read and some really good stories. Highly recommended. Took me forever to get through it, but thats my fault for being to damned busy!

    For those of you who are clueless, Bob Johnson is probably the most notable pilot to ever come out of Montana, and a bush flying legend.

  2. #2
    Ursa Major's Avatar
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    I'll second Jimmyfly's opinion of "Fly the Biggest Piece Back". Reading it brought back lots of memories of watching Johnson Flying Service DC-3s and Tri-motors hauling smokejumpers out of Missoula. I can almost still smell the smoke! Those were the days!
    Mike

  3. #3

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    The best bush flying book that I have read is "Wager With the Wind" by James Greiner. It is the biography of Don Sheldon from Talkeetna, AK who was a living legend when I was growing up. This is a MUST read if you enjoy Super Cubs and incredible feats of aviation, i.e. landing a PA-18 at the 14,000 ft level of Mt. McKinley to rescue stricken climbers. The book is full of stuff that will not allow you to put it down. And full of great photos too!

  4. #4
    Ursa Major's Avatar
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    I now know why my 4th grade teacher had us do book reports. It was one of those things I never expected to have to use in later life. Since the topic is books and flying, I'll list a few that I've enjoyed over the years.

    Those of us who live in Alaska are lucky for a lot of reasons. In addition to the scenery and animals we have some really good bookstores. Most people don't realize that alaskans are pretty prolific readers. One of the subjects that has always been popular here is aviation. There are more than a few books written about local folks who just happen to be pilots.

    Jimmy Doolittle's autobiography " I could never be so lucky again" is phenominal (bet you didn't know that he lived in Nome during the gold rush)

    F.E. Potts' "Guide to Bush Flying" is a terriffic little book with lots of tips and tricks and a bit of philosophy just for spice.

    Jack Wilson's "Glacier Wings and Tales" tells the story of another one of Alaska's premier glacier pilots.

    "The Flying North" by Jean Potter is out of print but still available in a number of used bookstores. It tells the stories of many of the early day bush pilots like Eielson, Reeve, Archie Ferguson and Joe Crosson.

    I could go on and on. Title Wave books in Anchorage (no I don't work for them) usually has copies of these and many others in stock. The books are worth a read and Title Wave is worth a look if you get to Anchorage (they also will mail order books to distant customers)
    Mike

  5. #5
    S2D's Avatar
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    Couple more that come to mind. "The Barnstorming Mustanger", The one about Clyde Ice, and "Montana and the Sky"
    Wager with the Wind and Fly the Biggest Piece Back are probably my favorites.

  6. #6
    kcabpilot's Avatar
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    I'd have to vote "Wager with the Wind" as my favorite, probably have read it at least 3 times over the years. "Arctic Bush Pilot" was ot quite as good but still worth reading. "Flight of Passage" isn't about bushpilots but about two teenage brothers who flew a PA-11 from New Jersey to California in 1965.

  7. #7
    SJ's Avatar
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    Wager with the Wind is the best I have read as well, I have about 30 books on the subject - but I don't have some of the ones listed above. One of the reasons it is so good is that it is written well. Some of these BP books are transcribed conversations with 90 year old guys (not that there is anything wrong with being 90, I plan to do that myself someday) that just don't "read" real well.

    I am reading "Papa was a Bush Pilot" right now which is a book done by a lady up your way about her dad. www.papawasabushpilot.com I'll be doing a review of that on.

    The sucks here again today. I hate this transitional time.

    sj

  8. #8
    Ursa Major's Avatar
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    Steve,

    "Papa was a bush pilot" is a story (as you said) about growing up in Bush Alaska during the 50's and 60's. I liked the book more for its historical anecdotes - for example Cleo (the author's father) built one of the Iditarod checkpoint cabins during the 1930's and I helped rebuild the same cabin a few years ago- than for the descriptions of flying a Cub.

    The author owns a B&B in Palmer and at least one of her brothers is still a bush pilot - flying the same cub his father did. In fact, as I recall, he won the shortfield TO and landing contest for stock cubs several years ago at Gulkana. As a bit of Alaska history the book is fascinating, but don't expect a whole lot of hardcore flying adventures.

    "Wager with the wind" is a good read as are a number of Harmon "Bud" Helmricks' many books. As Kcabpilot pointed out "Flight of Passage" is entertaining as well - a good story.

    One of my favorites is "Heroes of the Horizon" by Gerry Bruder which is a compilation of stories of some of Alaska's lesser known (but still important) early bush pilots. Gerry knows what he writes about - 25 years ago he used to fly beavers around SE alaska. I spent more than a few hours as a passenger flying with him through some of the most miserable weather on the planet.
    Mike

  9. #9
    SJ's Avatar
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    Thanks. I have read "Heroes on the Horizion" and "Flight of Passage" which is a GREAT story about flying cubs. We should probably start a "List of books to read page when the weather is like it is" page

    sj

  10. #10
    Ursa Major's Avatar
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    There are a lot of wonderful books on flying - stories by Richard Bach, Ernest K. Gann, and Antoine De Saint Exupery- but darn few "good" books on bushflying.

    Many, are as you noted, narrations by good pilots with interesting stories told to not very talented writers. I've gritted my teeth while reading what should have been a wonderful story, but because of the inability of the author, the story became just another "Me and Joe went flying" story.

    Okay, one last recommendation for bush pilot sories -- "Adventures of the Iditarod Air force" by Ted Mattson. It's yet again a compilation (see a pattern here) of stories about volunteer pilots who fly supplies, dogs, and people during the Iditarod Sled Dog Race. I don't know how hard it will be to find outside Alaska, but the ISBN # is 0-945397-59-3. The folks at Title Wave Books in Anchorage should have it as well.
    Mike

  11. #11
    jon s. blocker's Avatar
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    good reading

    Another good book, while not about bush flying persay, is West With The Wind. Written by Beryl Markham, it is about early flight in Africa, by a female aviation pioneer.

  12. #12
    Cubus Maximus's Avatar
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    books

    A book I enjoyed (compilation not withstanding) was "Winging It", The Jack Jefford story. The flight up the Yukon to Fairbanks with a wounded miner in the dark during a February snowstorm alone is worth the read.

    For good AK aviation stories I really liked, "Wager with the Wind", "Rocks and Wings" and "F.E. Potts". "Bush Pilots of Alaska" (the coffee table book) is also pretty good.

    I've got a pile of others but these are the best ones. Does anybody have a review of Mort Mason's new book, "Alaska Wild"?

    (Hey, Doolittle's biography was great too) (Cannibal Queen, Stranger to the Ground, Yeager's first one, The list goes on and on...) (My favorite series though is actually Patrick O'Brian's, Aubrey / Maturin books. NYT calls them (20 books - each a chapter) the best historical fiction ever written and I'd have to agree.)

    Brad

  13. #13
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    A few of the lesser known ones:
    Glacier Wings and Tales, by Jack Wilson,
    Ice Runways, Roy Mason
    Skystruck, Cliff Cernick
    Canadian Bush Pilot, Ernie Buffa, by Florence Whyard.
    Mudhole Smith, by Lone Jansen.
    King of the Ice, Don Johnson

  14. #14
    T.J.'s Avatar
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    Forgot:
    In the Shadow of Eagles, By Jim Reardon
    Trails of an Alaskan Game Warden, Ray Tremblay.
    And a hunting book,but has Cubs in it. Trophy Rams of the Brooks Range, Duncan Gilchrist.
    The Quest for Dall Sheep, Jack Wilson.

  15. #15
    kcabpilot's Avatar
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    Veering off subject just a smidge here:

    I've been considering coughing up the cash for a copy of the "Hard Core Cubs" video tape from Northern Pilot. Is it worth it? Also there is a sequel, is one better than the other? Any opinions or advice?

  16. #16
    Steve Pierce's Avatar
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    I like the second one better, more flying and stuff.

    Steve

  17. #17
    Todd C's Avatar
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    Regarding videos, in addition to "Super Cubs Part I" & "Super Cubs Part II Hard Core", I enjoy "Bush Pilots of Alaska" (produced by Migratory Films in AK, excellent footage) and "This is My Alaska" (documentary-type story about a hunting guide active in the 50s & 60s that uses Super Cubs). Also, take advantage of your local library to request the videos and books mentioned via inter-library loan. You can then review them before spending money.
    Thanks Chesney thanked for this post

  18. #18
    Cubus Maximus's Avatar
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    books

    Oh hey, I forgot: "Fate is the Hunter" EG

    Videos. "Super Cubs II" is the better one and less expensive. "Bush Pilots of Alaska" is an excellent video with a lot of Cub flying (especially Paul Claus in an Ultima Thule Lodge Cub)

    "This is my Alaska" has a lot of good early Cub flying but you better not have any Greenpeace leanings because if it crawls across the tundra or flies, it dies "Hey, what's that over there on the hill? A wolverine? Blam!! All right you got him Donny!"

  19. #19
    StewartB
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    "Flying Cold" The story of Russ Merrill (Anchorage's Merrill Field is named after him). Open cockpit, over the top of the Alaska range, in the winter? The pilots that pioneered what we do for fun did it in hostile conditions and uninhabited country. Open cockpit in winter? Too tough for me. Also look for any stories about Bob Reeve, (Don Sheldon's father-in-law). He flew home made skis off of tidal mud flats to get to the Wrangel Mountains snow fields. For those of you that are coming to Alaska next year, think about renting Don Sheldon's Mountain House on the Ruth amphitheater (on Denali). It is available to rent and surprisingly reasonable.

  20. #20
    Jerry Burr's Avatar
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    Books.

    Hi Folks. I have the above books and they are all good. "Fate is the Hunter" by Ernie Gann, is probably the best written because not only was he a very talented writer and pilot but he was there. The book is a masterpiece. But the one that I have read as many times is, "Glacier Pilot" the story of Bob Reeves. If there had of been Super Cubs in the days of his flying the mud flats, he would of had one. Take Care. Jerry.

  21. #21
    PA12driver's Avatar
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    Another great book:

    Alaska Bush Pilots in the Float Country
    written by Archie Satterfield written about float flying in the early days in SE Alaska.

    If you get your hands on this one you will be pleased!

    Tim

  22. #22

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    Other books that I've enjoyed are Wings of the North by Dick Turner and True North by George Ericson. George had a different appoach to his writting that I saw as refreshing.

    itsgpk

  23. #23
    Ursa Major's Avatar
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    Another couple of books that you might find interesting are: "Arctic Bush Pilot" by James "Andy" Anderson, another memoir of post world war II bush flying along the Koyukuk River (quite a few photos).

    Jerry Bruder's first flying book, "Northern Flights" is about his career flying in Southeast Alaska in the 1970s. I have to admit to some bias about this one since I was there (and flew with Jerry several times as a passenger). If memory serves, the stories are pretty factual.

    If any of you folks plan to visit Alaska by small aircraft, you really need to pick up a copy of the Alaska Airman's Association "Logbook" subtitled "Flying Your Airplane to (and in) Alaska". It was originally edited by Don Bowers who was killed in a crash on Denali in 2000. Don was a pretty talented writer as well as an Iditarod musher. Along with the "Milepost" the Logbook is one of the best sources for how to find your way around Alaska. Alaska Airmans Association Phone # is (907) 245-1251. Web address is www.alaskaairmen.com.
    Mike

  24. #24

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    Books To Read-- When You Have Time - Of Course

    Currently reading "Stick and Rudder" at night b-4 bed (so taking
    awhile) but when I'm done, my next one I'm hoping to get to is called
    "Bush Pilot Angler" - a memoir about Lee Wulff. My wife bought it for me
    from Down East Books in Camden, Maine-- Looks pretty interesting!!

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    Now halfway through Wager with the Wind. A few things stand out, naturally sheer tenacity is one of them. However, the other thing is luck. Sheldon had an almost unbelievable amount of luck, firstly for suriving 26 missions over Occupied Europe, then walking away from a number of horrendous wrecks unharmed and sometimes escaping unharmed with his aircraft intact from almost impossible situations. Amazing.

    Luck is the great imponderable.

    BCB
    Likes 68Papa liked this post

  26. #26

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    Another interesting read is Outlaw Pilot and Outlaw Pilot II, about Jimmy "Midnight" Anderson. Join "Midnight" as he travels Northern British Columbia in some amazing tales in the Jackpine Savage ( his cub , because he's hard on the tree's). Great stories like doing a Caribou relocation for the Wildlife Branch and tieing live caribou in the back seat of his Cub. Or freezing a bed sheet to his wing in the winter to limp his Cub back out of the bush. An entertaining read.

    Good reading, Dave

  27. #27
    Cubus Maximus's Avatar
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    Ramchaser, I had a friend do something similar to the bed sheet routine once. In this case he was flying a 135 hp PA-18 up north of Whale Cove (Hudson Bay) on his way to deliver sacks of flour to someplace I can't remember.

    He landed out on the sea ice and promptly tore the belly out of the airplane on a jagged piece. He and the other guy with him then took a pot (survival equipment), poured flour in it added ice and heated it up to a stew. They took several (now empty) flour bags, soaked them in the stuff and slapped them on the belly where they froze into place and then they flew home.

    Brad

  28. #28
    kcabpilot's Avatar
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    Expanding on the topic of Don Sheldon's "luck", another must read book is Yeager's biography. Still another is Dolittles bio. I don't think I've read about anybody who crashed more planes than that guy and lived to tell about it!

  29. #29

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    Currently reading "Stick and Rudder" at night b-4 bed
    Yeah, very nice book with lots of valuable advice and an angle on the theory of flight which I have yet to see a modern flight school emulate. I just wish he wouldn't refer to the elevators as 'flippers'. Makes you feel like he's talking about flying pinball machines.

    BCB

  30. #30
    Anne's Avatar
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    What flying magazines do you folks read? I've been reading Flying and AOPA Pilot for the last 8 years or so, and all the issues seem to be the same now. Getting kind of boring. Are there any magazines that have more stories and articles about "our" kind of planes and flying?

    Anne.

    P.S. Reading Bud Helmerick's book, Last of the Bush Pilots, got me over my fear of "emergency landings" when I was first training. Seems all his landings were emergency landings, only up there they're called off-airport landings. Since he survived all his off-airport landings, I realized that pavement wasn't the only place you can put a plane down safely.

    Anyone know where you can buy his books, or are they out of print? Is he still around? Still flying?

  31. #31

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    Anne, One magazine to try with good articles is Northern Pilots.
    Cheers, Ramchaser

  32. #32
    Cubus Maximus's Avatar
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    magazine

    Anne...

    www.northernpilot.com ....Good magazine and mucho better than Flying, AOPA etc... EAA's Sport Pilot is a good secondary read as well.

    Brad

  33. #33
    Ursa Major's Avatar
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    Anne,

    The only complaint I have about Northern Pilot magazine is that it doesn't come out often enough. It only comes out every couple of months. I'd like to see it as a weekly, but I suppose the quality might suffer. It's a good read. I would also suggest ordering back issues since there is a lot of very good Supercub related material that has been covered in the past. A few of the frequent contributors to this web site have also had articles in Northern Pilot.

    As for Bud Helmericks. I believe he is still around (at least I hope so). Most of his and his late wife Connie's books are (I believe) out of print. Most of them can be found at Title Wave books in Anchorage, www.wavebooks.com or (907) 278-9283. Connie (Constance) wrote a book a few years ago called "Down the Wild River North" about a canoe trip with her two daughters. Nothing about flying, but an interesting story. Connie's daughter Jean Aspen has also written a book about living (more appropriately surviving) in Bush Alaska called "Arctic Daughter". Again, no flying, but an interesting story.

    Bud and Connie used to film all of their adventures and present the films at seminars in the lower 48. The old TV show "Bold Journey" in the mid to late 50's (I'm dating myself) presented several of Bud's 16mm travelogues. Seeing those old TV shows inspired me to come to Alaska. Anyway, check Title Wave for out of print Alaska Books. They probably have what you want. If not, they can sometimes call arounf and find it.

    Good Luck
    Mike

  34. #34

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    If anybody's looking for these old books, try www.abe.com It works really well.
    BCB

  35. #35
    Anne's Avatar
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    I've entered my subscription to Northern Pilot, and waiting for the first copy. Finshed True North - made me want to get floats for my plane and take a summer off from work. Just finished Fate is the Hunter - excellent! Halfway done with a book by Alma Heflin, who worked for Piper in Lock Haven - what a trip! She and a girlfriend take off from Lock Haven in a Cub Coupe in 1940 for Alaska, wearing dresses and high heels (I keep wondering about that - high heels and heel brakes??).

    Thanks, Mike, for the info on Title Wave Books in Anchorage. I already bought Connie Helmericks' Down the Wild River, and they just called me today to say they have a copy of Last of the Bush Pilots by Bud Helmericks. They're fantastic - just tell them which book or author you're looking for, and they keep track of who wants what, then call you when it's in, even if it's a used book.

    Too many books, so little time! Anne.

  36. #36
    Ursa Major's Avatar
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    The weather has been lousy for the last few days so I decided to pick up another flying book. The title of this one is: "Rocks and Wings" by C.L. (Pete) Sainsbury. (published 1990 by author)

    At first I thought that this one wasn't going to be very good since it is self published by the author and is basically a story of his life as a geologist prospecting for minerals. However, within a few pages he hooked me.

    This guy spent 47 summers (and 15,000 hours) flying a cub in bush Alaska, landing in some of the most god awful places while wrecking only one plane (though he bent a lot of them). He describes a lot of useful techniques (like repitching a bent prop with a rock and landing on water with tundra tires). He once walked away from a wreck (40 miles to the nearest village) across tundra in less than a day. He did this so his friends wouldn't have to come looking for him and report him missing.

    This old bird has to be tougher than boiled owl!

    Although, I admit I wasn't interested in his accounts of mineral discovery, I was fascinated by his bush flying stories. He recounts a story of breaking his leg while looking for minerals, crawling and hobbling to his helicopter, then flying the helicopter to a base camp, climbing into his cub and flying a couple of hundred miles to the hospital.

    Anyway, I enjoyed it (the flying part) and would recommend it (if you can find a copy).

    Brad- I notice you mentioned this book in an earlier post --where did you find it? I found my copy at (of all places) a gunshow in Anchorage.
    Mike

  37. #37
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    Hey Mike,

    I bought my copy of ol' Pete's book "Rocks and Wings" from Jim Richmond back in '93 or '94. Pete had written in the SCPA newsletter and that got me interested in his book. (did he sign all the copies he published?)

    I actually enjoyed the mineral hunt as much as the flying. Building that Cub borne tree clipper so you can ash the branch and determine the minerals in remote forested parts of AK was pretty cool. (also his investigations of the Pre-Can rock dwellings). My copy is a bit dog-eared now as its been across the Atlantic and back plus around the country here.

    I think Pete passed on about 5 or 6 years ago.

    Brad

  38. #38
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    Mike, I forgot to mention that a friend of mine owns one of Pete's old Cubs and has it for kinda' sorta' for sale (he doesn't fly it much due to time constraints etc...). I'm not saying where or how much as I have my eye on it

    Brad

  39. #39
    Ursa Major's Avatar
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    Brad,

    Thanks for the quick reply. The copy of "Rocks and Wings" I got is also autographed. Sorry to hear Pete has passed on -- what a remarkable character.

    His airbourne tree clipper had me scratching my head - the last time I hit a tree in an aircraft (as a passenger) didn't turn out to be too pleasant. Since you mentioned it, I do recall a letter or article Pete wrote in SCPA newsletter about water landings on wheels. I was pretty sceptical at the time, but I see now how and why he did it.
    Mike

  40. #40
    Ursa Major's Avatar
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    Brad,

    After reading about all of Pete's landing adventures ( ..."we dug a hole so the prop wouldn't dig in when we flipped the cub back on to the wheels") I'm not sure I'd want his old cub. Mine has a pretty checkered past itself. Near as I can tell mine was completely rebuilt at least 4 times as the result of less than perfect landings. The good thing is that for a 50 year old airplane it probably doesn't have too many original parts (other than the data plate).
    Mike

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