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pipercubnut
04-19-2010, 04:36 PM
Hello all,

I just wanted to share a letter that I received via email from the manufacturer of the tubing kit, it is as follows;

James

We have the Wag Aero Sport Trainer modeled from the Wag Aero plans. However, we have never completed the set since no one has ever ordered one.

We could adjust the model to include any features or design changes we are aware of. Let us know and we will complete this tube set for you.

Have you considered the Bearhawk Patrol (2 place tandem)?



Let us know how we can help you on whatever project you build.



Don VanRaay

VR3 Engineering Ltd.

Cartesian Tube Profiling

45 Dunlop Place, Stratford, Ontario N5A 6S4 Canada

email: don@cartesiantube.com

dvanraay@vr3.ca

ph: 519-273-6660

fax: 519-271-6888

www.cartesiantube.com

I am still undecided on which project that I want to tackle but thought that this might be of interest to some of you. Looks like all that they need is an order and it is good to know that they will work with us on the configuration.

James

Crash
04-19-2010, 06:02 PM
These guys also sell a Cub tubing kit. I think it's made by the same company you're talking to.

http://www.bushwhackerair.com/bushcubtubing.htm

Take care,

Crash

pipercubnut
04-19-2010, 06:40 PM
Hello Crash,

I have been considering the Bushwhacker Supercub profiled tubing kit. I have been unable to locate anyone that can comment on it. I wish that I could chat with someone that has completed one. I guess my biggest concern is having to work out too many "bugs". But I guess someone has to be the first to complete one. I like the mods that are incorporated but am not knowledgeable enough to make an informed decision. I love the Alaskan Airframes fuselages but just can't shell out $14,000 for a bare fuselage. (I wish that I could.) Man it would be nice to just open a crate and go to work on assembly, but I do like to weld.

I thought about building my own design from electrical conduit. I will call it the "Conduit Cruiser" What do you guys think? Just kidding :D

James

strangeak
04-19-2010, 09:37 PM
THere was a guy that did just that in Alaska a while back... I think it was called the willbird or something along those lines.

Here is the specs i was able to find.

http://www.glacierbear.com/willbirddata.jpg

Crash
04-19-2010, 09:57 PM
Hello Crash,

I have been considering the Bushwhacker Supercub profiled tubing kit. I have been unable to locate anyone that can comment on it. I wish that I could chat with someone that has completed one. I guess my biggest concern is having to work out too many "bugs". But I guess someone has to be the first to complete one. I like the mods that are incorporated but am not knowledgeable enough to make an informed decision. I love the Alaskan Airframes fuselages but just can't shell out $14,000 for a bare fuselage. (I wish that I could.) Man it would be nice to just open a crate and go to work on assembly, but I do like to weld.

I thought about building my own design from electrical conduit. I will call it the "Conduit Cruiser" What do you guys think? Just kidding :D

James

I don't think it would be too big of a deal if you had the exact plans that the tubes were profiled for and built a full size "build table" to lay it out on and hold things in place for initial tacking.

After "hand profiling" all the tubes I replaced in my PA-14 rebuild with a hand held die grinder, this looks like a piece of cake.

By the end of the project I could give any dentist in town a run for his money in a precision grinding contest! :lol:

I talked with Chris today at Bushwacker Cubs. He said they also have gear and are coming out with a zero thrustline dynafocal engine mount.

They were offering $500.00 off their tubing kits till the end of March (little late, might ask if he'll extend it..). With fittings, you might be able to complete it for under $4,000.00.

Take care,

Crash

pipercubnut
04-19-2010, 10:32 PM
Hey Strangeak,

I was joking about the "Conduit Cruiser" but nothing would surprise me. Some of the machines that people used to get over the wall in Germany were probably constructed of conduit or pretty close. I did find an aircraft that has the wing spars made of conduit and polystyrene. It is called the Affordaplane. I don't think that I would feel good flying on conduit and polystyrene. If you want to fly bad enough I guess.

James

pipercubnut
04-19-2010, 10:48 PM
Crash,

I agree 100% about the profiled kit being a real time saver. I also like the idea of not having to second guess poorly printed blue prints (like most are) and just line it up, tack it up and finish weld. I think TIG or OXY/ACETYLENE would do a nice job as long as I can do a nice job. I need some practice. I'm used to welding farm equipment not 4130 thin wall tubing. I want to see how Bushwhacker develops. Hope to see a completed model soon.

James

Bugs66
04-20-2010, 12:01 AM
James,
Even with the profiled tubing you still need to jig up your parts on a table with wood blocks on a level building table, using plumb bobs where appropriate, etc. You need to carefully take measurements and verify all dimensions. The profiled kit saves you time in cutting and fishmouthing.

The PA-18 drawings are quite clear and easy to read. I would recommend you take on the tail section first to make sure you like the build process. If you get through the tail, then you are ready for the rest. Start with the fin, probably the easiest part to fabricate and you then have something to hang on your wall to be proud of. If you screw up on the fin, then make it scrap and build another. Probably $10 in materials is lost and that is all. Then go for the stabs, then elevators, and rudder. Also, building the rudder and brake pedals are a good intro too. My 2 cents. Good luck!

Marty57
04-20-2010, 01:32 AM
James,
I would have to say that cutting the fish mouths was one of the easiest parts of scratch building my fuselage. I used this site http://metalgeek.com/static/cope.pcgi to generate all my patterns for my fuselage. Yes, this does take more time than just opening up a box and pulling out a pre cut tube. Take a look at the process on my site to see what goes into a scratch built fuselage. The pre cut tubes only eliminate the tube cutting; all other jigging will still need to be done. Personally, I enjoyed the process.

Marty57
www.xanga.com/martyfeehan

mike mcs repair
04-20-2010, 01:56 AM
Hey Strangeak,

I was joking about the "Conduit Cruiser" but nothing would surprise me. .....

actually the guy(s) Crash bought his 14 project from made a few conduit planes... said you survived the crashes better, or some reason.......... :o :o

pipercubnut
04-20-2010, 02:12 PM
Hey Guys,

I was thinking of building some of the smaller pieces of the airframe first because of the practice factor. I have taken a few welding classes but they were only a start, kind of an introduction to TIG so to speak. I know that I can make something hold together (looks like bubble gum :( ) but want to do a good job. I knew that I would need to do jigging with plywood or MDF. There are a few videos that I would like to order regarding fuselage construction. I like the "Tin Man" videos from TM Technologies, Ron Covell also produces very nice videos. Both men have tubing specific videos and welding equipment. I also saw a construction video on the Preceptor web site that shows the construction of a "STOL King" fuselage. I need to practice and build my confidence level. Feeling comfortable with the plane that I am flying means everything to me. I have flown some less than confidence building aircraft in my time (overstressed beer cans with seat belts that I used to fly in flight school), hate to name the school. The whole building process is more of therapy for me than anything but it is also a way to get a new aircraft out of the deal and pay as I go, even if it takes me ten years. I appreciate any and all advice that you all give, many of you have been there and done that. One last question that I have is in your opinions, which print is the easiest to read and the most accurate to use if I scratch build? I have the Northland CD, is the Northland fuselage print accurate? It looks like it will be easy to read when printed.

CubChaser
04-21-2010, 08:45 AM
Bugs is right you should start with the tail first. I purchased my tail in kit form from Steve at Experimental Aircraft Metal Fabrication http://www.super-12.com , then worked from the northland drawings to assemble them. The cub is a great plane to build because you can do all of the work yourself or purchase a complete kit and just assemble it. Itís a money and time thing, the more money want to invest the less time it will take you.

pipercubnut
04-21-2010, 11:10 AM
Cubchaser,

When you do the tail first, do you then weld and jig the forward section off the tail and proceed with welding? How far forward of the tail post does the tail kit reach? I have seen the tail sections that Airframes Alaska sells, are these tail sections about the same and are they profiled kits? I appreciate any and all the tips that I can get.

James

Bugs66
04-21-2010, 01:32 PM
I recommend you join your EAA chapter and start networking with other builders. SC.org isn't really setup as a "how-to" place, more quick tips and advice. If you do some searches on Google and visit my web site, you will find many builder logs with step by step photos. Anyone building a Cub clone, Skybolt, Bearhawk, etc all have the same construction process for steel frame structures.

If you start studying the drawings and learn how to find cross reference drawings, all the answers are there for dimensions, distance from tail, etc.

Good Luck!

DaveG
04-21-2010, 02:35 PM
When they say start with the tail...They mean build the tail surfaces (fin , rudder, stabilizer, and elevator) ...Not the aft fuselage.
DaveG