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wilhelm tell
12-10-2005, 09:58 PM
We have a 22 year old son, 2/3 through A&P school (Westwood School of Aviation, Jeffco Airport Colorado, former Aero Tech), straight A's so far, honorably discharged from the Army, enthusiastic worker, looking for a job as a mech/apprentice as of August 06. Very interested in Cubs, fabric work and restoration.
My first thought was Steve Pearce in Graham, TX, a real expert in the field. Steve, if you read this post, tell me your suggestions. Of course anybody else, please let us know.

Thanks

Chris

CubCouper
12-10-2005, 10:45 PM
If he wants to practice on my Cubs, I could use a cheaper mechanic to help!!! (I just got a bill for a $934 annual on the ol' J4 -- mind you it had less than 2 hours on it since the last annual by the same mechanic.)

jetech
12-10-2005, 11:16 PM
This would be my advice from one AMT (A&P) to another, If you want to make the most money in the field go to work for UPS or Fed-ex and work on light aircraft on the side or as a hobby. Freight offers stability that passenger airlines can't.

I have been an A&P since 1984 and learned early that typically the money and benefits are in the heavy jets.

I don't mean this as a slam to the mechanics in the GA field which by the way I have a lot of respect for and would love to work on some of the planes they get to, but if he is after the most money in the shortest time he may want to consider the heavy jets.

Dano Bardwell
12-10-2005, 11:25 PM
being an A&P /I/A myself I've had customers in the past whine about the bill regardless the time on the tach. when this happens to me I tear up the bill! its free - nada, ......I take the loss, I think your mech should have done the same to you! A good reputation as an aircraft mechanic is hard to achieve let alone maintain with all the personalities in the field. one unhappy customer can screw things up for a while. however I am reluctant to work on that plane again!

Steve Pierce
12-10-2005, 11:49 PM
Go with your heart, work hard and you will be successful and happy. It might not be the highest paying job but my wife has to threaten me to get me to come home. If he truly wants to work on rag and tube airplanes give me a call. He can learn, make a living and have fun doing it and I could use the help. :D

redrooster
12-11-2005, 11:36 AM
If he wants to practice on my Cubs, I could use a cheaper mechanic to help!!! (I just got a bill for a $934 annual on the ol' J4 -- mind you it had less than 2 hours on it since the last annual by the same mechanic.)

I kinda like doing owner-assisted annuals on my airplane. If you're right there helping/doing the work, the person doing the billing will usually find it kinda hard to overbill you with a straight face. I don't mind paying legit charges, but close to a thou for what, 8 or maybe 10 hours work? That's a bit much. Of course, I don't know what-all was involved, maybe there was a big list of squawks to fix,new parts installed,etc. I usually do my own annual maintenance--grease wheel bearings,new air filter,ELT battery/brake pads/oil change as required, etc-- in the week or two preceeding the inspection, so usually all that's involved is the actual inspection itself. Unless something bad is discovered, like a broken part or a flat cylinder. I have friends that never address squawks as they come up, just put everything off til annual time- then they're surprised when they get a big bill from their IA after a month of down time.

Rooster

wilhelm tell
12-11-2005, 12:16 PM
Thanks Steve, I'll call you Monday.
Chris

cubflier
12-11-2005, 02:25 PM
mind you it had less than 2 hours on it since the last annual by the same mechanic.)

I think someone up above is sending you a message --

You definitely need to fly more.

Jerry