PDA

View Full Version : Rib Stitching Alternative ?



Ahmet Kamil
09-02-2004, 04:14 AM
Why do we have to stitch the wing covering fabric to the ribs, why don't we simply inject glue (simple) ?

Wingie
09-02-2004, 06:51 AM
Why ask why? If the fabric is allowed to "lift", it will balloon up, spoiling the shape of the airfoil and possibly tearing off in flight. Stitching is a proven method of attachment that works. Other methods may benefit the original installer, but most times destroy the wing ribs when attempts are made to remove the attachment. Martin clips and screws do the destruction upon installation. "Gluing" would no doubt be easier for YOU, but how would the "next guy" remove it? You probably wouldn't own the aircraft in question if the "last guy" had done it that way, because it would have been a "one time deal" and you would have thrown the wing ribs away. Then there is the thought that if "something could be used to soften the glue to remove the fabric" when the time comes, then that "something" could soften the glue on the airplane when you didn't want it softened. Furthermore, how would you inspect such a "connection" for attachment security? Lift every inch or so of favric to see if it is still stuck down? No thanks. At least you can LOOK INSIDE and see if stitching is intact. Airplanes have successfully flown with the wing fabric sewn on for almost a century. Technology is a wonderful thing. But come on. It's worked on Cubs for 70 years. Where is your pride in Tradition? Stop thinking so much and get busy ribstitching. Besides. Ribstitching is approved. Gluing is not.

Wingie
09-02-2004, 06:53 AM
Double-post. Text removed.

Steve Pierce
09-02-2004, 07:17 AM
The balloning of the fabric can pull the fabric away from the ribs. The other problem is getting the fabric taughteness even across the wing. Kifox and I believe the Avid is done like this but Polyfiber and I believe Ceconite do not recommend it.

Phil Kite
09-02-2004, 10:17 AM
Aerodynamic lift pulls up on the fabric. This force is transferred to the ribs and then the spars. The rib stitching transfers the flight load of the fabric to the "whole" rib not just the top. The original Piper ribs are so light that they are probably not strong enough to support the flight load on the top only.

bob turner
09-02-2004, 10:15 PM
Hey - rib-stitching can be fun! And it looks sort of "antiquey". Don't even consider any other method of attaching fabric to ribs - the pop rivets simply destroy the ribs, the Martin clips are really ugly, and damage the ribs, and any glue strong enough to make a difference is really going to mess up your finish, not to mention the crooked ribs due to uneven shrinkage.

sekps
09-03-2004, 04:34 AM
There's no magic involved in rib stitching. It's actually a quite rewarding and in some way contemplative work.

I made my first stitch a year ago when it was time for my wings. The Ceconite manual in one hand, AC 43.13 in the other and five or six stiches later it all was in my fingers. Haven't needed a manual since then. I can't really understand all this talk about "The Gordian Knot".

Worked alone (which meant that I had to walk from one side to the other and back for each stitch) and I made the first wing in 8 hours. The second wing took 5 hours. With a helper I would have made both wings in a day - even as a rib stitch beginner!

/Mattias

JP
09-03-2004, 07:06 AM
Bob:

Perhaps what you meant to say is that you shouldn't consider any other method than rib stitching on Piper ribs. There are STC'd replacement ribs that are approved for methods other than rib stitching and due consideration should be given to those methods.

There is a very good thread on rib stitching and other methods of attachment that is a great review of the considerations regarding rib stiching and rivet attachment.

In sum, both methods have their merits and both are relatively easy and even enjoyable to do. There is more than one way to reskin the cat, so to speak.

bob turner
09-03-2004, 08:35 PM
Wasn't even thinking of those other ribs. I'd never drill a hole in the Dakota Cub rib. and I personally wouldn't use the Univair rib. It's an aesthetic thing.
Rib stitches are things of beauty. Cubs are now antiques, and should look the part. Rib stitches are part of the mystique. My opinion.
That said, the Univair rib may have a sharp edge that will cut the stitches. Could be the pops are safer on those ribs.

JP
09-03-2004, 08:48 PM
Wasn't even thinking of those other ribs. I'd never drill a hole in the Dakota Cub rib. and I personally wouldn't use the Univair rib. It's an aesthetic thing.
Rib stitches are things of beauty. Cubs are now antiques, and should look the part. Rib stitches are part of the mystique. My opinion.
That said, the Univair rib may have a sharp edge that will cut the stitches. Could be the pops are safer on those ribs.

Yup, the aesthetics of the rib stitching is a definite attraction. I personally love stitched ribs. One can, however, upgrade the wings without sacrificing much if anything in the aesthetics department. The strength, durability and safety of the Dakota and Univair ribs are worth due consideration, especially for a "working" Cub.

Sure is nice to have the choice and after seeing the Univair and Dakota Ribs in action I'm a convert. Same for modern restraint systems, onboard fire supression, wired in intercom, ipod inputs, confor foam seats, and a couple of extra tubes in strategic locations...

Bill Ingerson
09-04-2004, 07:20 PM
J.P You mentioned a fire supression system, is that just a onboard fire bottle or something different. In race cars we have plumbed spray nozzels around the engine and the drivers feet. I was curious, maybe there is something different. Thanks

Bill

JP
09-04-2004, 08:06 PM
J.P You mentioned a fire supression system, is that just a onboard fire bottle or something different. In race cars we have plumbed spray nozzels around the engine and the drivers feet. I was curious, maybe there is something different. Thanks

Bill

I'm just making fun of the fact that I attached a marine grade fire extinguisher right in front of my seat on the floor. Seems like a good bit of insureance, though. Perhaps it would buy me some time to get out in a bad situation.