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Rookie
09-03-2002, 12:29 AM
In my brief aeronautical career (I've been licensed for about three years, and am coming up on 300 hours) I'm not proud to admit that I've made a series of mistakes that very nearly cost me my life. Like an all too common group of pilots, I suffer from a monumental ego, and in spite of all kinds of warning signs, didn't catch my amazing error. Because I've learned from the mistakes of others, I am obliged to similarly share my humbling experience.

At one time I had ambition to fly a fast complex IFR plane where ever I wanted to, and I spent a lot of money to that end. Below follows the story that adjusted my attitude about taking to the skies, and how I want to do that. I wrote this a while ago, not too long after my accident, and I'll present it now as I wrote it, grammatical warts and all. The story below ends before now, I do have a nice VFR Super Cub now, and if you want to post a response here to my story, I don't mind. I will never forget what I did.

Sometimes you really just want to turn back the clock.

I?d owned my plane, a Cessna Cardinal RG, for almost two years. We?d completed an annual, during which a number of things had been fixed, and in the months leading up to the annual, we?d also fixed a number of items. The plane had spent more than a couple of weeks grounded, but I?d still managed to fly it about 165 hours, including the completion of my PPL. I was gaining confidence flying it, and was looking forward to continuing my training in it. I decided to have a custom panel built for it. After shopping around for a while, and thinking about what it was I wanted to do, I decided to have something really nice built. Who cared if it was worth about as much as the rest of the plane, it was my plane, and I was willing to invest in it for the long term. I finagled a decent deal, and in August during prime flying weather, put the plane in a shop 60 miles from my home. The job was supposed to take one month.

It didn?t take one month, I wasn?t surprised about that, but in spite of maybe one lull, progress was coming along nicely. The guy I?d hired to do the work was doing beautiful work. It did end up taking four months, but it was worth it. Unfortunately, it was now out of annual, but with the assistance of my shop, I got a ferry permit from the FAA. In the middle of December I went to reclaim my plane. After some time looking at everything on the ground, I took off, and flew the mandated direct flight home. I used the one old radio we?d saved from the previous panel because I was most familiar with it, and it was a simple half hour flight I?d done many times before. I got home and put my beauty back in my hangar. She was home!

http://supercruiser.org/albums/album81/aaa.thumb.jpg
Click here (http://supercruiser.org/albums/album81/aaa.jpg) for full size.

The plane went into the shop for annual, and a few days later I got the dreaded call. The plane had corrosion in the wings where the spar caps met the skin, and it didn?t look good. Why this hadn?t been detected in the pre-buy inspection two years prior is something we won?t go into here. I was rapidly learning just how much I was living with my plane. After we opened one wing by removing an inboard skin, and with an improvised jig supporting the structure, we discovered it was even uglier than it had seemed peering in through an inspection hole. Inter-granular corrosion in the metal of the spar cap was likely. I called around to see if anyone had proper jigs for the wings, and was interested in rebuilding them, but no promising leads played out. It wasn?t economical to rebuild the wings. I called around and got lucky, I found a set of wings at a salvage yard in Kansas that would work. It was particularly lucky in that my plane had a smaller wing tank than most Cardinals, and replacing them with wings having a different sized tank would have required the use of a DER, which I really didn?t want to get into. I flew commercially to Kansas, and after spending a day driving and a night in a motel, inspected the wings personally. They looked really good! I paid the five figure price, and made arrangements to have them trucked to me on an empty aircraft recovery return run.

It took a while for some rigging work to be done, and the installation of the landing lights that weren?t part of the wings in 1972, but after a while the wings were finally ready for painting. I personally trucked them in a very large rental truck to a paint shop, and helped bring them back too. Installation was finally finished after a few more weeks, and I made arrangements to meet the lead mechanic, and perform the test flight. In retrospect, I wish I?d told them they could find a pilot to do the test flight, but I still was pretty happy with the plane, in spite of all the expenses, both expected and unexpected, it had incurred over two years. I felt responsible for it.

It was a really nice day the morning I met the lead mechanic to go fly. I did my preflight, and we got in. She started right up, and in spite of thinking ?okay, now is not the time to play with the panel?, I couldn?t resist turning everything on. In case you?re wondering by now, yes I was using a check list. I was also really very happy to be flying my plane again after not flying it for about eight months. I?d borrowed a friends Cardinal for my biannual two weeks before that flight, and had spent some time flying with my instructor, but that wasn?t the same as getting to fly my plane.

For some reason, I never noticed that the ailerons were moving in the wrong direction. They did move smoothly and proportionately from stop to stop, and felt normal. I sure had every reason to check them twice, and I have been taught the common mnemonic devices to remember which way they are supposed to go. I?m sure that if my tail feathers had been backwards it would have set off red lights in my brain, but for some reason I never got it. Up until the day of my accident, it had always required a moment of consideration to remember which way the ailerons were supposed to go, but not so when I thought about the rudder or the elevator. I was thinking about a lot of things, but which way the ailerons are supposed to go wasn?t one of them. After getting clearance, we took the runway, and started a take off roll.

We did make it off the ground. There was front quartering wind with probably about a 5-8 MPH crosswind component. As we left the ground, the plane began to roll a bit to the left in response to the wind from the right. I attempted to adjust with a little bit of aileron input to the right and things began to feel funny. I thought something was dragging the left wing, and got the idea that the wings were badly out of rig. Instinctively, much like riding a bicycle, I tried to regain my balance, and went to full stop. The plane did an accelerating bank over to the left until the left wing tip dragged on the runway. I think the wing tip sort of bounced off the runway, and we were turned around by the force until we were facing back the way we came. We hit the runway nose low going backwards, but mostly level. I did see the pavement coming, but I never had time to panic or get scared, all I had time to do was yell ?Oh sh*t!?. We slid backwards on the main gear and smashed nose about 250? until we went backwards, tail high, through the back half of a Beech Musketeer tied down off the runway, and came to a stop. I said ?Well, we?re alive?, my passenger said ?Let?s get out of this thing?. We did.

As I said, I never did get it. The aileron reversal was pointed out to me at the scene of the accident while I was talking to the deputies and fire department officials. The FAA guy was there too, and actually was pretty decent about the whole thing. I got a small cut on my nose from one of those hard plastic sun visors you can install (I?m not sure they are a good idea), but otherwise no one was hurt. That is pretty amazing, this all happened at a pretty busy airport where traffic could have resulted in a much bigger mess. We had full tanks, and every once in a while I think about what would have happened if one of the tanks had ruptured, but not for very long. If there hadn?t been any wind, we could have had enough altitude so that the results would have surely been fatal.

I sure do regret this event. I love planes, and I hate being responsible for there being two less around to fly. The mechanic who was in the plane with me, and who supervised and signed off on the work is a pretty decent guy, and he?s taken this pretty hard. I?m very happy to be alive.

I am still flying. The FAA re-examined me with particular attention to pre-flight, and hasn?t taken any enforcement action against me, they sent me a letter saying I could keep all my privileges. I?m in the process of buying another plane, but I?m doing things a bit different this time around. I?m shopping for a VFR Super Cub with the money I got from the shop?s insurance company. I may continue my IFR training some day, but for now, I want to fly outside of the cockpit, and not spend a lot of attention on instruments.

There are a bunch of old timers saying right now ?See, I told you all that new fangled stuff confuses you?. I can?t quite agree with that, because I think a lot of the new devices make navigation much less of a chore. But I do think there are many elements to flying, and a test flight is something that can easily be overloaded.

I?m asking anyone who reads this to please respect my privacy. You may meet me face to face someday, and if you do I?ll be happy to talk to you about this accident, but I wouldn?t mind forgetting it either.

-------------------------

If you screw up like I did, you too can have one of these, an NTSB report:
http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=20010426X00818&key=1

I've got lots of pictures, here are a few:
http://supercruiser.org/albums/album81/aab.thumb.jpg
Click here (http://supercruiser.org/albums/album81/aab.sized.jpg) for full size.

Can you see what I missed? If you look closely, you can tell which way the yoke is pointing...
http://supercruiser.org/albums/album81/aac.thumb.jpg
Click here (http://supercruiser.org/albums/album81/aac.sized.jpg) for full size.

Later in the hangar:
http://supercruiser.org/albums/album81/aae.thumb.jpg
Click here (http://supercruiser.org/albums/album81/aae.sized.jpg) for full size.

Waving good-bye...
http://supercruiser.org/albums/album81/aad.thumb.jpg
Click here (http://supercruiser.org/albums/album81/aad.sized.jpg) for full size.

SJ
09-03-2002, 07:39 AM
Thanks for posting your story, its an opportunity for us all to learn something at your expense. It must be pretty easy to reverse the ailerons since this seems to happen a lot...

You will be happier now that you have real airplane anyway... :wink:

sj

CaptFox
09-03-2002, 04:45 PM
Hey Rookie...

Good learning story for ALL to read...Its great to hear that you are still flying after an experiance like that and I believe storys like that should be told for us all to learn from and maybe even save someone elses life for just the knowledge of reading it.

I bet alot of people do the flight control check and dont actually pay attention to which way the operate plus many other checks, they just go through the motions and don't actually do the TASK... I'll even admit I've done it myself :oops: and seen many friends do it also.

I dont remember who told me this saying "Learn from your mistakes and the mistakes of others as you wont live long enough to make them all yourself"

Thanks for the story and HAPPY SUPERCUB flying... :lol:

David...

TURBO
09-03-2002, 07:30 PM
good story,

i've known two guys in the fighter community that had the same thing happen as you; only they both died. everyone please remember the importance of the pre-flight because we all get complacent at some time.

turbo

bushmaster
09-05-2002, 11:59 AM
lost a close friend in an f16 with the exact same problem. sad, he had young kids. :(

FlipFlop
09-05-2002, 03:44 PM
I did the same thing in a Musketeer in 1972... Mouseketeer had been rebuilt after an accident and I took it for a test flight before delivering it to the owner... They say I got about 300 ft. in the air before I came down on a wingtip and cartwheeled... Tore the engine off and demolished the airplane... Thank God, I don't remember anything 2 weeks before or after the accident, but I have the scars to remind me... I wish I could say "I learned about flying from that", but I still forget to check if the ailerons are following the stick... David

PA12driver
10-08-2002, 01:40 AM
Rookie,

Good story, your humility is encouraging! As you may have seen from my story, I was blessed to have lived through a "learning experience" myself! I lost a friend in a beaver in Alaska about 15 years ago for the same reason!

For those that read this, I was privelaged to meet "Rookie" this summer on his maiden Cub Flight--off airport and he is a true winner, and a humble man! I watched him land his 'new Supercub' in a strip 3/4 of a mile away from our little fly-in off airport strip and "walk" over. I for one appreciated his humility then to not go beyond the limits he set for himself!

You will make a good cub pilot! Welcome to the fun world of flying!

Tim

Bret
10-08-2002, 04:05 PM
Well, first off, glad to hear that nobody was seriously injured.
As a student pilot, I am still practicing and realize the benefit of a thorough pre-flight but I've never thought to check for correct control movements, but I will from now on. I guess the bottom line is that you can never be sure that someone else has checked everything, especially in a case like yours where the wings were replaced and major work was done.

SJ
10-27-2003, 06:14 AM
Here is the story of Rookie, recovered from the vast archives...

sj

cub_driver
10-28-2003, 10:11 PM
Rookie

Great story thanks for taking the time to post it.

Cub_Driver

mvivion
10-28-2003, 10:23 PM
For those who have trouble remembering which way the ailerons should go:

put a hand on the stick (or yoke, it works either way), extend the thumb of that hand straight up. Now, move the stick or yoke to the left. The thumb is pointing to the aileron that should be UP, as in the direction of your thumb. Move the stick (or yoke) to the right, and the extended thumb is pointing at the "up" aileron once again.

As I noted, it works for a stick or a yoke, right hand, or left.

An easy reminder.

Rookie, thanks for the reminder, hope your future endeavors are a bit smoother.

Mike Vivion

Cub Kid
10-28-2003, 11:45 PM
Rookie,

it takes a lot of balls to relate a story like this, but as everyone above has said...it is important to keep telling it to prevent it from happening to others. Thank God you are alright bud.

Bill

Rookie
10-29-2003, 12:10 AM
Believe me, I remember now. I hope no one else has to learn to remember this the way I did. (Although history teaches us that this will happened to someone else again, some day.)

nanook
10-29-2003, 03:13 AM
Rookie: That's a tough break so early in your flying career. We put a 180hp in what was a 150hp cardinal and I test flew it while doing the new engine break-in, it was the first one that I had flown and was a very good performer. Hate to hear that another one has bit the dust. I hope that your future lessons are not this expensive, (but the expensive ones are the easiest to remember). I remember the beaver that went in at Hood, he was unable to save it, wasn't high enough to have enough time to figure it out. Things could have ended up much worse for you, so count your blessings. I don't know what happened to the maintenance practice of having someone double-check any critical "safety-of-flight" item. when I was a green A&P, the old-timers beat that one into my head.

Rookie
10-29-2003, 04:56 AM
Things could have ended up much worse for you, so count your blessings.

Hey, amen to that. I spent a long time kicking myself over missing such a glaring error, it was really hard for a while, but at the same time a huge joy to remember that I was still alive. The work was all done in what had to be as large a GA Cessna type shop as any around, super nice folks, pretty clean, no obvious red flags as to what was going on. The guy riding right seat who's name was in the logs went through some real soul searching too, and damn near left his 20 year plus career over the event. In many respects, it was just the beginning of my trials too, after this happened, within a fairly short period of time, I lost my job (twice), and the real capper, my mother died. Mom died last summer, and it's been tough to not curl up into a ball. But... life is short, and right now, I think I've turned a corner, and here I am, alive, and boring all of you every chance I get!

This Thanksgiving is going to be a real special one for me. As I say, I've turned the corner. I have a great PA-18. I'm still a minor league low time (350 hours) recreational pilot, and I still catch myself fiddling with the (one) radio in my plane, but I'm living large, and there is nothing but blue sky. Work is even looking up.

Here's the capper. SHHHH, it's a secret. I'm asking my girlfriend (who doesn't read this web site) to marry me this Thanksgiving dinner in front of my entire family. No one knows I'm going to do this! Don't tell! So, life is truly what you make of it, and my life is something I'm making good. The accident was the first in a long string of trials, and the most potentially fatal, but not the last. Mom's death was the hardest, and all of this has combined to provide me with a remarkable new perspective.

Good luck to all in all your aviation endeavors!

Jerry Gaston
10-29-2003, 09:50 AM
Hey Rookie
Stories like this are very valuable for every one who reads these threads and is what makes this web site unique for pilots. I often wonder what the Northern Pilot people were doing for stories and why they don't go looking for experiences from the general reading public instead of those writers with a product to sell with biased info. Ill bet everone who has read your story does a better preflight including me.
Keep us informed about this thanksgiving.

Rookie
10-29-2003, 10:19 AM
I wrote it mostly in response to the Cessna Pilots Association publishing my NTSB report while it was still preliminary (and indicating that my right seat passenger took the very minor injury, a cut nose, rather than the correct fact, that I had), and while the tail number still had my name on it in public databases. I'm not hiding, but I don't like telling my real name with this story to people who are unknown to me, I like being able to defend myself when people attempt to pass judgement on me about the event. Getting tips on pre-flight is always amusing too. Anyhow, to CPAs credit, they did publish my write up at the first opportunity. If Northern Pilot wanted to publish it, I'd let them (and expect to be paid some minor stipend as an author). Here, it's free, no cover price required.

I'll let you all know how the Thanksgiving chapter of the story of Rookie plays out.

drew
10-29-2003, 10:23 AM
My first job I signed off on was a Piper electric trim on an Archer II. That thing is just a mess of spaghetti back there, and I checked, rechecked, tested, retested and had the IA look at it, twice. My boss made sure my log entry was "squared away" and then we wheeled it out the door. And the customer walked out of the pilots' lounge with his young, lovely wife and their two little 5-10 year old girls, walked around the airplane, got into it, fired it up and took off. I had been a mechanic for approximately 1 week and I went home that night alternating between wanting to throw up and to quit. I did the job right; the pilot checked back in and praised the function of the unit to the skies, but my gut was in a knot when he took off, and I can still get myself in that mood, when I think about it.

Still, I love doing this stuff so much, I cannot see ever giving it up. I just wished it weren't so dangerous.

Drew

StewartB
10-29-2003, 10:25 AM
Rookie,
Good story. Thanks for being so honest. Maybe we should start a thread about the avoidable errors we've made that could have killed us. I could contribute to it, unfortunately.

As for marraige....congratulations, that is if she says yes. You have heard the story that scientists have found the source of adult women's diminished sex drive? Wedding cake. Here's to you!
SB

S2D
10-29-2003, 01:48 PM
My first job I signed off on was a Piper electric trim on an Archer II. That thing is just a mess of spaghetti back there, and I checked, rechecked, tested, retested and had the IA look at it, twice. My boss made sure my log entry was "squared away" and then we wheeled it out the door. And the customer walked out of the pilots' lounge with his young, lovely wife and their two little 5-10 year old girls, walked around the airplane, got into it, fired it up and took off. I had been a mechanic for approximately 1 week and I went home that night alternating between wanting to throw up and to quit. I did the job right; the pilot checked back in and praised the function of the unit to the skies, but my gut was in a knot when he took off, and I can still get myself in that mood, when I think about it.

Still, I love doing this stuff so much, I cannot see ever giving it up. I just wished it weren't so dangerous.

Drew

Good reason one should never fly an airplane after maintenance with anyone but the mechanic that did the work. But we all do it and we all let it be done. At least Rookie had the right guy with him. He not only survived but he might have saved the mechanics next customers life too.

HATIN11R
11-11-2003, 03:16 PM
ROOK,GLAD YOUR O.K.& STILL FLYING.ALOT OF FOLKS WOULD HAVE "PACKED IT IN"AFTER THAT RIDE.YOUR STORY & MANY OTHERS I REFER TO AS "GOTCHAS".WITH JUST UNDER 1800 HRS.TT IN TWINS,SINGLES & TAILDRAGGERS I TOO HAVE HAD MY SHARE OF "POTENTIAL GOTCHAS".I DEFINE THESE EVENTS AS ANYTHING THAT CAN LEAD TO OR CAUSE A DANGEROUS SITUATION.IT CAN BE SOMETHING SO SUBTLE AS AN UNUSUAL DROP IN RPM DURING A MAG.CK(THAT WILL NOT CLEAN-UP W/RUN-UP) TO WAKE TURB.AT A MAJOR AIPORT.AS PILOTS OUR BIGGEST ENEMY IS "COMPLACENCY"!!!!! AS THEY SAY,THERE ARE OLD PILOTS & BOLD PILOTS.BUT NO OLD BOLD PILOTS.(WELL YEAH,YEAGER).ANYWAY YOUR STORY GIVES US ALL A WAKE-UP & REMINDER AS TO THE SOMEONE ELSE CAN BECOME "US".THANKS.....NOW I WILL SHARE TWO GOTHCAS: 1)IT WAS NIGHT & I WAS DOING T&G LFT.TRAFFIC FOR RWY 27.I HAD JUST TURNED LFT.BASE AND I NOTICED AIRCRAFT LIGHTS ENTERING A MID FIELD RT.DN.WND RWY 9.THERE HAD BEEN NO RADIO COMM.EXCEPT MY POS.REPORTS.I REPEATED MY POS.& INTENTION FOR T&G RWY.27.I THEN TURNED FINAL & REPEATED ON UNICOM M Y INTENTIONS & IF THERE IS OPPOSING TRAFFIC THAT 27 IS IN USE.NO RESPONSE....ON SHORT FINAL I STILL HAD NOT HEARD FROM OR SEEN THE LOCATION OF THIS IDIOT.(BUT WAIT HE COULD BE SOME POOR LOST,NO RADIO EQUIP.AIRCRAFT,RIGHT?)WELL I BROKE RT.& ANNOUNCED A GO-ROUND.AT THAT VERY MOMENT THIS GUY TURNS ON HIS LANDING LIGHT RIGHT AT THE THRESHOLD OF RWY.9 AND PROCEEDS TO LAND.I ASKED THIS GUY OVER THE RADIO IF HE EVER SAW OR HEARD ME & ALL HE SAID WAS HE WILL BE OFF THE RWY.SHORTLY BECAUSE HE IS JUST DROPPING OFF SOMEONE.NOW I'M NOT A HOT HEAD & I DON'T FIGHT PEOPLE.BUUTTT.....IF I WAS ABLE TO HAVE GOTTEN ON THE GROUND BEFORE THIS GUY TOOK OFF IT WOULD HAVE BEEN AN "EVENT".MORAL:IF IT DOESN'T LOOK,SOUND OR EVEN FEEL RIGHT,GUESS WHAT!! IT PROB.ISN'T RIGHT & MAY KILL YOU! HAD I NOT ELECTED TO BREAK OFF I HAVE NO DOUBT WE WERE GONNA DANCE ON THAT RWY. SWALLOW THE PRIDE & KEEP THE MACHO OUT OF THE COCKPIT FOLKS!! GOTCHA #2 I'M FLYING BACK FROM N.M.& NOW IN N.E. TEAXAS AT 7500'VFR.THERE ARE SCATTERED CLOUDS AT 9-10K & VIS.IS ABOUT 20-30.AS I'M FLYING ALONG I SEE A STAEDY BURNING RED LIGHT TAHT APPEARS MOTIONLESS & LOOKS TO BE GETTING CLOSER.FIRST THING I THINK OF IS AN OPPOSING PLANE AT MY ALT.I KEEP WATCHING THIS LIGHT & IT STILL SEEMS TO BE GETTING CLOSER.NO OTHER LIGHT ARE NOTED HOWEVER.THEN ALL OF A SUDDEN THIS RED LIGHT GETS SEEMINGLY VERY CLOSE & BRIGHT.I INSTINCTIVELY TURN AWAY FROM THIS LIGHT TO AVOID A COLLISION.WELL MY HEART GOES FROM A NORMAL RATE TO ABOUT 140 IN A SPLIT SECOND AS I TURN.WHAT THE HECK GOT SO CLOSE SO FAST?..............ANY GUESSES BEFORE YOU READ ON....QUICK COVER YOUR EYES & STOP READING...........................THE MOON ALMOST HIT ME!!!!YEAH THE MOON WAS RISING BEHIND A LAYER OF CLOUDS & WAS SLIGHTLY SHINING THROUGH WHEN I FIRST SAW THE RED LIGHT.THEN IT POPPED OUT THROUGH A HOLE AND BECAME REAL"CLOSE & BRIGHT".WELL I HAD A GOOD LAUGH AT THAT.(AFTER I STOPPED SHAKING).MORAL:JUST LIKE MEDICINE,ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE IN AVIATION IF ALL THE RIGHT OR WRONG CONDITIONS COME TOGETHER. WELL FOLKS I HOPE THIS HAS HELPED ALL OF US & MAYBE EVEN GIVEN YA'LL A SMILE....BLUESKIES,HERMAN IN TEXAS.

diggler
11-11-2003, 04:19 PM
delete

HATIN11R
11-12-2003, 08:15 AM
DIGGLER.......as i have posted earlier on this site,i am a pilot/paramedic not a writer.when i went to school there were no computers and typing class was an elective.(and not one many folks took)but alas this has come back to haunt me.i am not shouting,it is just easier for me to post in caps.i guess i just like to keep things as simple as poss.alittle like flying a CUB.low,slow,basic seat of the pants stuff.(although i have gone alittle over 500'& 100mph)well anyway i hope this clears this issue up.but hey DIG...did you like my post?that really was the main focus i hope.well hope all is well with you & yours & keep the shiney side up! blue skies to all.

Rookie
11-12-2003, 08:28 AM
Herman,

I liked your post. I also like it a lot more when you type in all lower case rather than in all upper case. It's a long time email tradition to consider upper case shouting, and reading a long posting like that is painful (sort of anyhow).

Hey, did you know you can edit your post after you put it up? You can, button in the upper right corner.

I'm trying to think of a simple way to convert a large chunk of text from all upper case to all lower case... maybe our admin will have an idea, because I'm not suggesting you type it all again, not at all. But if our admin had a trick to quickly convert it to all lowercase...

Again, I did like your stories, dodging the moon and all. Good stuff!

Regards,
-->Aaron

SJ
11-12-2003, 08:31 AM
True, but UPPERCASE is better than not typing at all, which is what most folks do...

sj

HATIN11R
11-12-2003, 10:00 AM
well thanks for the support from everyone.i guess this is easier to read than all CAPS.maybe w/time i can get into the "21 st "century computer ettiquette thing.but please be patient & kind cause ya'll know how sensitive a "20 yrs.street paramedic"can be....oh, and by the way everyone makes this a great site!! p.s.....speaking of 21 st century stuff,i do have a great ifr panel consisting of dual garmin gps goodies and the like.who said it's great to be the king,or have them.(that was alittle avionics humor aimed at King.they are still good but garmin/apollo is spanking em but good.are you listening KING?) again great site & i would like to hear of other "gotchas"by ya'll.to learn is to live and fly another day! blueskies baby!!!

Rookie
11-22-2003, 10:09 AM
Okay, so I couldn't wait. I ended up "rehearsing" my Thanksgiving toast to Kim this morning, culminating in my proposal of marriage and the presentation of the engagement ring I picked up a week ago. I just couldn't wait, and didn't want to put Kim through a public proposal.

So, good bye S.O., hello fiance!

-->Aaron

p.s. I worked out this morning for 40 minutes, about 30 in my cardiac "target zone". I think my BP is coming down. Now, if I can just figure out where to get a $100 "heart smart" hamburger!

Bret
11-22-2003, 12:43 PM
Good luck Aaron. Don't worry, she's gonna say yes.

Bret

Gunny
11-23-2003, 12:22 AM
removed

supercubc37
11-23-2003, 11:18 AM
Gunny

If you want a recomendation for a blender just ask Wilbur for one. He's gone through several to know which ones hold up. :drinking:


Matt

Rookie
11-23-2003, 11:32 AM
I want one of those gas powered models!

http://www.gasblender.com/

-->Aaron

Gunny
11-23-2003, 12:18 PM
removed

RedBaron
11-27-2003, 07:33 PM
Congratulations Rookie and Happy Turkey Day! Just read through all your stories, and must say, I REALLY respect and appreciate your honesty and candor. You have nothing but good things to say through all the bad things that happened.
Regards,

Andy

howieb38
12-03-2003, 11:27 PM
Sooo? What happened when you proposed??

By the way, great story. (About your flight I mean.)

Rookie
12-05-2003, 04:26 PM
Oh, she said "Of course I'll marry you".

However, I chickened out on doing it in front of the whole family. I did it the Saturday prior, early in the morning (we were both wearing our bathrobes). I said I needed to practice my toast, so I did, and at the end sprang it on her.

For Thanksgiving, I just did a toast, talking about all the great things to be happy about (like surviving the story above), and ending with a toast to Kim. Then, as glasses approach lips, I said "WAIT!", and "There's one more thing I'd like to say, last Saturday I proposed to Kim, she said yes, we are engaged to be married". Went over well with the large group of Catholics from my uncle's wifes family, who had been struggling hard on what to call Kim most of the night ("I'm just going to say wife, even if you aren't married", I guess significant other doesn't roll of the tongue).

Thanks again for listening, the PA-18 community really is a super one.

-->Aaron

Cub Kid
12-05-2003, 04:36 PM
Oh, she said "Of course I'll marry you".



Man you say that pretty nonchalantly.

Bill

Rookie
12-07-2003, 08:17 AM
Well, I guess I'm still in shock! I've been engaged for 15 days, and it's going to take a while for "fiance" or "wife" to roll off the tongue, I still catch myself saying "girlfriend" (although since we've lived together for over four years, that's not too accurate).

Ever planned a wedding? Man, that's a growing experience. It will strengthen our relationship, I'm sure of that, but has provide occasion for "venting" or "acting out" (my terms, not hers, and in reference to me, not her). I'm not a planner, but Kim is, and we'll learn a thing or two doing this, no doubt.

Date is shaping up to be October 2, maybe. That gives us enough time to work out all the logistics, in particular book a hall in Seattle proper. Also, by then the salmon runs are strong, and we can serve salmon (won't buy the farm stuff) to a crowd of probably 75.

I'm glad we're doing this, but we'll end up with a second loan on the house (tax deductable), and sometime I wonder if I shouldn't have just dragged her to Las Vegas (can't stand the place)!

-->Aaron

SJ
12-07-2003, 09:05 AM
Rookie:

I wanted to get married in jeans and a t-shirt under a tree with only a dog and three robins as guests.

Ended up getting married in a church, in a tux, and having about 200 of my closest friends present.

There was a slight difference between Dana and my idea of a wedding.

Fact is, this particular ceremony more than any other our society has built up to be the sacred domain of women - TV, magzines (have you ever seen "Grooms" magazine? No? I didn't think so), etc. So I say "Let them prevai! and garner what society has thrust upon them!"

It will pay off in the long run, of course, that depends on how long you have to pay for it....

sj

GreggB
12-07-2003, 11:07 AM
I got the dream wedding, my wife was in jeans I settled for sweatpants. State park overlooking the ocean. About 20 people, went to a friends house afterwards, fed everybody with 300 bucks worth of takeout BBQ.
If ya can't get one of these best advice is to diplomatically stay out of the planning. Mothers can get a little crazy with weddings. Wedding planning sessions would be a good time to be out flying.
Gregg
PS my wife is a nurse.

cubdrvr
12-07-2003, 12:28 PM
Rookie:
Ended up getting married in a church, in a tux, and having about 200 of my closest friends present.
sj

I AM impressed.........I don't even know 200 people.

SJ
12-07-2003, 12:37 PM
Actually, it was 199 of Dana's friends and a guy I owed money to.

sj

sodak
12-07-2003, 03:23 PM
steve, luckily your not getting married now, you have 1080 newfriends to invite. dean

paddy9953
02-26-2004, 04:10 PM
I rember when trainig and doing a controls check and moving the stick
to the left and looking left, whoops no aileron. I still fly a real plane, a
PA18AS 180hp Cub. Paddy.

Rookie
02-26-2004, 04:17 PM
Off hand, I'd guess that no aileron is better than one or both that go the wrong way. :o

-->Aaron

p.s. I'm getting real close the having more time in my PA18 than in my ill-fated Cardinal RG. I'm not going back. 8)